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by Jill Berry, posted by Deb Shaw

Looking up into the canopy of Platanus racemosa, or Western Sycamore. Photo by Deborah Shaw, 2014.

Looking up into the canopy of Platanus racemosa, or Western Sycamore. Photo by Deborah Shaw, 2014.

Don’t forget Matt Ritter’s class on trees on Saturday, September 6 at 9:30 am at the LA Arboretum. Matt’s previous class in June, The Botany of Trees, was enthusiastically attended and filled with accolades at the completion! This will be the second of three workshops with Matt:

Tree Diversity and Natural History, with Dr. Matt Ritter
Workshops for Homeowners, Landscape Professionals and Plant Lovers at the Arboretum

Discussion will focus on the remarkable tree diversity in Southern California (including natives), how to identify trees, and how to appreciate them.
Saturday, September 6, 2014
9:30 am – 12:30 pm
301 North Baldwin Ave., Arcadia 91007

$25 Arboretum members per class; $30 non-members per class (includes Arboretum admission)
Please call the Class Registration Line at 626.821.4623 to register, or you may register at the door.

Be sure to save the date for Matt’s third (and final) lecture in the tree series:

Saturday, October 11: Trees for the 21st Century in Southern California
The focus in this class will be on the most appropriate trees for both small yards and for Southern California’s climate, in addition to undeservedly rare trees for this region and how to find them.

Matt Ritter has a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and a Ph.D. in plant biology. He has authored numerous scientific papers and botanical treatments, including the second edition of the Jepson Manual, the Flora of North America Project, and a natural history guide to San Luis Obispo plants. He is a professor in the Biology Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and director of the plant conservatory there. He holds a Kenan Fellowship at the National Tropical Botanical Gardens, is the chair of the City of San Luis Obispo Tree Committee, and editor-in-chief of Madroño, the journal of the California Botanical Society.  http://www.baobabbotanical.com/Ritter

by Jill Berry, posted by Deb Shaw

Looking up into the canopy of Platanus racemosa, or Western Sycamore. Photo by Deborah Shaw, 2014.

Looking up into the canopy of Platanus racemosa, or Western Sycamore. Photo by Deborah Shaw, 2014.

The Los Angeles Arboretum is offering an opportunity to learn about the botany of trees in a series of workshops:

ALL ABOUT TREES with Dr. Matt Ritter
Workshops for Homeowners, Landscape Professionals & Plant Lovers

Each workshop will be held from 9:30 am – 12:30 pm.
$25 Arboretum members per class; $30 non-members per class (includes Arboretum admission).
Please call the Class Registration Line at 626.821.4623 to register, or you may register at the door.

Saturday, June 21:  The Botany of Trees
This workshop is specially designed for homeowners as well as landscape professionals, and will teach you everything you need to know about how to pick, plant, grow and understand trees.

Saturday, September 6: Tree Diversity and Natural History
Learn about the remarkable tree diversity in Southern California, including natives, how to identify trees, and how to appreciate them.

Saturday, October 11: Trees for the 21st Century in So. California
The focus in this class will be on the most appropriate trees for both small yards and for Southern California’s climate…in addition to undeservedly rare trees for this region and how to find them.

The Los Angeles Arboretum is located at 301 North Baldwin Avenue in Arcadia, California 91007.

Matt Ritter has a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and a Ph.D. in plant biology. He has authored numerous scientific papers and botanical treatments, including the second edition of the Jepson Manual, the Flora of North America Project, and a natural history guide to San Luis Obispo plants. He is a professor in the Biology Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and director of the plant conservatory there. He holds a Kenan Fellowship at the National Tropical Botanical Gardens, is the chair of the City of San Luis Obispo Tree Committee, and editor-in-chief of Madroño, the journal of the California Botanical Society.  http://www.baobabbotanical.com/Ritter

by Deb Shaw

Janice Sharp (left) and Pat Mark (right) demonstrating and staffing the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table.

Janice Sharp (left) and Pat Mark (right) demonstrating and staffing the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. photo by Peter Conlon

On Saturday, February 2, 2013, BAGSC participated in Roger’s Garden’s first “Day of Art” in Newport Beach. Fifty artists, using different media participated in a full day of drawing and painting demonstrations and workshops. The “Day of Art” was free to the public and for all ages.

Pat Mark talking with visitors to the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. The Information Table also displayed books, originals and prints of contemporary and historical botanical art and scientific illustration. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Pat Mark talking with visitors to the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. The Information Table also displayed books, originals and prints of contemporary and historical botanical art and scientific illustration. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Additionally, BAGSC had an interactive table where visitors could explore the botany (and some unusual) fruits and vegetables, and make stamp prints with them. BAGSC also had a botanical art information table, with a display of originals, prints and books of all kinds of botanical art, from scientific illustration to plant portraits, historical and current.

Tania Marien at the BAGSC Interactive Table, photo by Deb Shaw.

Tania Marien at the BAGSC Interactive Table, photo by Deb Shaw.

BAGSC artists participating included: Diane Daly, Clara Josephs, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Sue Kuuskmae, Alyse Ochniak, Tania Marien, Deborah Shaw, Pat Mark, and Janice Sharp.

Tania Marien and Deb Shaw gave a two-hour workshop in the afternoon in the outdoor amphitheater on drawing flowers and leaves in pencil, with drawing boards, drawing paper and pencils provided by Roger’s. A watercolor and pastel workshop was offered in the morning by plein aire artists David Damm and Gill Dillinger,  and a gourmet food truck, “Bite Me Foods” provided lunch for those who were hungry.

Tania Marien and visitors to the BAGSC Interactive Table. Kids of all ages used fruits and vegetables to create stamp art.

Tania Marien and visitors to the BAGSC Interactive Table. Kids of all ages used fruits and vegetables to create stamp art.

The event had been postponed from the previous Saturday due to rain. The weather held out this Saturday, and the event was packed with enthusiastic participants, even with the change in schedule. People and their dogs strolled the grounds, bought plants and took in the art.

Attendees were eager to watch the demonstrations, and BAGSC members spent the day talking about botanical art, different media and techniques to interested customers. Many inquired about botanical art classes and were complimentary about the day’s events. Roger’s reported overwhelmingly positive comments from their guests.

Thank you to all who participated, and to Roger’s for hosting the event. We hope there will be more in the future!

Deb Shaw (left) and Tania Marien (right) teaching a workshop about how to draw flowers and leaves in pencil. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw (left) and Tania Marien (right) teaching a workshop about how to draw flowers and leaves in pencil. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw expressively describing the morphology of a banana inflorescence to Theresa Marino from Roger's Gardens. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw expressively describing the morphology of a banana inflorescence to Theresa Marino from Roger’s Gardens. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Sue Kuuskmae chose to draw in the shade section of the nursery, near a fountain. Photo by Deb Shaw.

Sue Kuuskmae chose to draw in the shade section of the nursery, near a fountain. Photo by Deb Shaw.

Clara Josephs (left) and Diane Daly (right) discuss botanical art and painting with visitors.

Clara Josephs (left) and Diane Daly (right) discuss botanical art and painting with visitors.

Alyse Ochniak demonstrating in the garden, photo by Deb Shaw.

Alyse Ochniak demonstrating in the garden, photo by Deb Shaw.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence demonstrating in the garden (in the luxurious outdoor furniture section). Photo by Deb Shaw.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence demonstrating in the garden (in the luxurious outdoor furniture section). Photo by Deb Shaw.

by Deb Shaw

IMG_2009The first “Day of Art” at Roger’s Gardens, originally planned for January 26 was postponed due to rain. It will be held, however, this Saturday, February 2, from 9 am – 4:30 pm.

Fifty artists will be painting and demonstrating in the gardens, including BAGSC members Bonnie Born Ash, Diane Daly, Clara Josephs, Suzanne Kuuskmae, Tania Marien, Pat Mark, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Alyse Ochniak, Janice Sharp and Deb Shaw.

BAGSC will have a table about botanical art, as well as an interactive table to explore plants, fruits and vegetables. Tania Marien and Deb Shaw will teach a workshop to the public on drawing flowers and leaves in pencil.

Plein aire painters will also be painting and demonstrating in the garden, as well as leading workshops. The event is free, open to the public, and can be enjoyed by all ages.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Rd., Corona Del Mar, CA 92625, 949.640.5800. “Bite Me Foods” food truck will be parked at the Victory Garden in the back parking lot from approximately 11 am to 2 pm.

rglogosmAnd, of course, the beautiful selection of plants in the nursery will be open.

Bring friends and family and see you there!

by Deb Shaw

ArtPlantae Display at Aurea Vista in Riverside, California, © 2012 Tania Marien

ArtPlantae Display at Aurea Vista in Riverside, California, © 2012 Tania Marien

This weekend ArtPlantae will participate in the First Annual Holiday Party at Aurea Vista, Riverside’s newest shopping destination.

The holidays aren’t the only thing to celebrate this weekend, however.

ArtPlantae is celebrating the launch of a new plant-based education display featuring resources for children, parents and teachers. Dedicated specifically to botany and botanical art education, this section features curriculum by the National Gardening Association, children’s books about plants (in English and Spanish), instructional books about drawing and botanical art, plant identification guides, and the Colorful Edibles coloring book published by the American Society of Botanical Artists.

When visiting ArtPlantae at Aurea Vista, don’t miss the display area upstairs featuring books about contemporary botanical art and botanical art history.

Discover more this Saturday during the holiday party. The festivities begin at 4:00 pm and continue until 9:00 pm. Meet local artists and designers and finish your holiday shopping too. Visit ArtPlantae’s new area about plant-based education and receive a free gift. It is located downstairs across from the children’s boutique.

Stop by on your way to the Festival of Lights and the Artists Collective located just down the street on the Main Street Pedestrian Mall.

Free gifts available while supplies last.

A Little About Aurea Vista

Aurea Vista is located in a building in downtown Riverside, California whose life began in 1927 as a hotel built by architect G. Stanley Wilson. Today the building serves as an exciting new marketplace for local artisans, designers, importers, food sellers and craftspeople.

Visit Aurea Vista and discover many treasures such as delicious olive oils by Beyond the Olive, terrarium designs by Brenda Cook of Botanical Perspective, and yards of inspiration (and classes too!) at Raincross Fiber Arts.

Aurea Vista is located at 3498 University Avenue in Riverside on the corner of Lemon and University. Hours are Monday-Saturday (11-8), Sunday (11-5). Store hours are extended for Riverside’s monthly ArtsWalk and other special events.

Parking: Free customer parking is available across the street in the parking lot with the ballet mural. Aurea Vista customers can park in spaces #1-8 that face University Avenue. Street parking is free after 5 PM Monday-Friday. Street parking also is free on Saturday and Sunday.

by Diane Daly and Clara Josephs, posted by Deb Shaw

January’s coming up fast, and the Chapman University Leatherby Library Drought Tolerant Plant Exhibition will be upon us (along with all the other exhibition opportunities we have stacked up for the month — but more on those later!).

Students from Jennifer Funk‘s Ecology course currently are writing descriptions of the plants’ drought-tolerant traits now. We are planning to have at least one species that fits into each of the following seven categories:

  • Drought-deciduousness (plants that lose their leaves during the dry season, or during periods of dryness)
  • Small leaves (better adapted to dry soils and conditions)
  • Deep taproot (a tap root that penetrates deep into the ground can access water when it is scarce during a drought or dry conditions, as well as store water in the root)
  • Succulent leaves (thick, fleshy leaves and stems can store water)
  • Pubescent leaves (pubescent, or furry leaves can slow the air flowing over the leaf to reduce water evaporation, hold water, reflect sunlight, and provide shade for the surface of the leaf)
  • Evergreen, sclerophylous leaves (evergreen leaves, of course, stay on the plant year-round; sclerophylous leaves have a hard surface and are frequently spaced close together
  • Annual life habit (one way to avoid dry periods is to quickly grow, bloom and develop seeds during the wet season, skipping the dry season altogether!)

Important Deadlines:

  • Artist entry deadline:  January 11 (BAGSC needs the list for handouts, Chapman University needs the list for labels and insurance)
  • Set up show in Henley reading room: January 25
  • Reception: February 7 , 7-9 pm
  • Take down the show: February 25

All BAGSC members will receive an email with the official BAGSC “Call for Entries” packet. If you do not receive this email with the attachment by 30 November, please contact Deb.

Drought Tolerant Plant Choices for the Chapman Exhibition

The following are plants that BAGSC members are planning to submit. Botanical and common names, of course, will need to be reviewed and verified. Don’t worry if you have to change your mind, or if you’re already painting something that someone else is painting on the list below. This is a preliminary list and is not set in cement. Space allowing, species duplicates will be accepted (see the Call for Entries packet).

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence:   
Dudleya Farinosa; Salvia Chamaedroyides, Electric blue sage; Desert Marigold, Baileya multiradiata; Echeveria graptoveria or Kalanchoe thyrsiflora

Bonnie Ash:
Agave Utahensis var. nevadensis; Pacific Mist Manzanita, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Linda Ericksen:
Prickly pear cactus, Opuntia

Joan Keesey:
California Buckeye Flower, Aesculus californica; Flannel Bush, Fremontodendron; California Poppy Eschscholzia californica; Foothill Penstemon, Penstemon heterophyllus;  or Heart Leaf Penstemon, Keckiella cordiforlia; Toyon, Heteromeles arbutifolia; Bush Monkey Flower, Mimulus aurantiacus

Patricia VanOsterhoudt:
Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemai indica; Columbine Aquilegia; Yucca

Sue Kuuskmae:
Fortnight Lily Dietus vegeta; Rock Rose Kalanchoe; Toyonberry; Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri

Estelle DeRidder:
Coastal Prickly Pear, Opuntia littoralis; Baja Fairy Duster, Dalliandra eriophylla; California Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia; Chia, Salvia Columbriae

Clara Josephs:
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica; Topsy Turvy, Echeveria; Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea

Diane Daly:
Island Alum Root, Heuchera maxima; Seaside Daisy, Erigeron glaucus; Bird of Paradise, Caesalpinia pulcherrima

Carmen Lindsay:
Bladder Sage; Ocotillo; Buckwheat

Veronica Raymond:
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica; Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea; Nevins Barberry, Mahonia nevinii; Englemann Oak Quercus engelmannii

Cristina Baltayian:
Lemon, C. limon; Bougainvillea; Fig, Ficus carica L. (Brown turkey); Olives, Olea europaea; Cabernet grape vitis vinfera L.; Pomegranate, Punica granatum

Mitsuko Shultz:
Nevins Barberry, Berberis nevinii; California Sycamore, Platanus racemosa

Patricia Mark:
Manfreda masculosa; Aeonium

Deborah Shaw:
Dudleya pulverulenta, Chalk Dudleya; Dudleya viscida, Sticky Dudleya; Arctostaphylos glauca, Big Berry Manzanita

Add your name and plants to the list: contact Diane.

It’s shaping up to be a great show!!!

by Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

Finally, we have the dates for our Chapman show on drought tolerant plants. We will have the Leatherby Library Henley Reading Room and the Clarke wall just like we used in the Brush with Nature exhibit.

We will set up and hang the exhibit on January 25, 2013. We will have an evening reception on February 7, and we will take down the paintings on February 25.

The botanist, Jennifer Funk will have her students write descriptions of drought tolerant plant groups with explanations of how the plants retain moisture and survive the heat.

Reminder, all paintings should be framed in the Dick Blick bamboo frame, white mat, and plexiglass. Use the same label on the back as we do for other exhibits. All members can submit up to four paintings. Paintings can be delivered to Diane Daly’s house the week before Jan 25 or brought to Chapman on that date at 10 am to be hung.

More details will be coming. Questions? Contact Diane Daly or Clara Josephs.

A plant selections list follows below. This list is just a “ working list” to let everyone know what other artists are working on. We hope this will inspire other members to paint for this exhibit. Don’t worry if you’re interested in painting something that is already listed below. Duplicates are not automatically excluded. Feel free to add, delete or change, depending on how your paintings are going. Let Diane Daly know. We’ll continue to publish updated lists.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence
Dudleya Farinosa
Salvia  Chamaedroyides, Electric blue sage
Desert Marigold, Baileya multiradiata
Echeveria graptoveria or Kalanchoe thyrsiflora

Bonnie Ash
Agave Utahensis var. nevadensis
Pacific Mist Manzanita Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Linda Ericksen
Prickly pear cactus, Opuntia

Joan Keesey
California Buckeye Flower, Aesculus californica
Flannel Bush Fremontodendron
California Poppy Eschscholzia californica
Foothill Penstemon Penstemon heterophyllus

Or
Heart Leaf Penstemon Keckiella cordiforlia
Toyon Heteromeles arbutifolia
Bush Monkey Flower Mimulus aurantiacus

Patricia VanOsterhoudt
Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemai indica
Columbine Aquilegia
Mountain Phlox
Yucca (another view)

Sue Kuuskmae
Fortnight Lily, Dietus vegeta
Rock Rose, Kalanchoe
Toyonberry
Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri

Estelle DeRidder
Coastal Prickly Pear, Opuntia littoralis
Baja Fairy Duster, Dalliandra eriophylla
California Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia
Chia Salvia, Columbriae

Clara Josephs
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica

Diane Daly
Island Alum Root, Heuchera maxima
Seaside Daisy  Erigeron glaucus

Carmen Lindsay
Bladder Sage
Ocotillo
Buckwheat

Veronica Raymond
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica
Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea
Nevins Barberry, Mahonia nevinii
Englemann Oak Quercus engelmannii

Deborah Shaw
Fuschia Flowered Gooseberry, Ribes speciosum
Blue-eyed Grass, Sisyrinchium bellum
Chalk Dudleya, Dudleya pulverulenta
White sage, Salvia apiana

Mitsuko Schultz
Nevin’s Barberry, Berberis nevinii
California Sycamore, Platanus racemosa

by Clara Josephs and Deb Shaw

Many BAGSC members have been asking about where they can find information about drought-tolerant plants. You can find a lot of information about drought tolerant plants on the web. Here is a section from the Wikipedia entry I was directed to after googling “lemonade berry”:

Rhus integrifolia, the Lemonade Berry’s leaves are simple (unusual in a genus where most species are trifoliate), alternating, evergreen and leathery, ranging from two to four centimeters wide on reddish twigs; length of leaves is five to seven centimeters. Leaves are toothed with a waxy appearance above and a paler tone below. The flowers which appear from February to May are small, clustered closely together, and may be either bisexual or pistillate.[1]

These fragrant flowers exhibit radial symmetry with five green sepals, five white to rosy-pink petals, and five stamens. The small flowers are only six millimeters across. The ovary is superior and usually has a single ovule; although in pistillate flowers, the stamens are small and infertile. The mature fruit of Rhus integrifolia is sticky, reddish, covered with hairs, and about seven to ten millimeters in diameter. The elliptical fruit presents tight clusters at the very ends of twigs.

Young plants manifest smooth reddish bark, while more mature individuals have cracked, even scaly, grayish bark with the smooth red bark displayed underneath. Twigs are rather stout and flexible, and reddish bud ends are diminutive and pointed. There is often a multi-furcate branching structure from the base of the plant. A mature plant is large and thicket-like with a sprawling arrangement.

Notice how many painting cues for color and structure are in that entry! It also tells me when it flowers.  Very useful and free information! Next, if I hit “images” for lemonade berry – bingo – what a selection!

The following is a list of California Native plants and their drought-tolerant adaptive strategies, compiled for us by Jennifer Funk, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology. Please keep in mind that the exhibition is open to any drought-tolerant plants from around the world, not just California natives! This list was handed out at a BAGSC Quarterly meeting earlier this year. Future articles on the blog will list characteristics of drought-tolerant plants.

Let us know your questions, or any future articles you would like to see on the blog about drought-tolerant plants.

A few drought-tolerant species, all native to southern California:
Scientific name, Common name

Drought deciduous (plants that drop their leaves during dry season or periods of dryness)
Achillea millefolium, Common Yarrow
Calliandra eriophylla, Pink Fairy Duster
Encelia californica, California Bush Sunflower
Encelia farinosa, Brittlebush
Keckellia antirhhinum, Yellow Bush Penstemon
Ribes aureum, Golden currant

Small leaves (small leaves have a reduced surface area, and so lose less water)
Adenostoma fasciculatum, Chamise
Arctostaphylos species, Manzanita
Artemisia californica, California sagebush
Ceanothus species, Ceanothus
Cercocarpus minutiflorus, San Diego Mountain Mahogany
Epilobium canum, California Fuchsia
Ericameria cuneata, Wedgeleaf goldenbush
Eriogonum fasciculatum, California buckwheat
Hazardia squarrosa, Saw-toothed Goldenbush
Isocoma menziesii, Coastal Goldenbush
Isomeris arborea, Bladderpod
Lotus scoparius, Deer Weed
Lycium californicum, Coastal Boxthorn
Mimulus aurantiacus, Bush Monkeyflower
Prunus ilicifolia, Hollyleaf Cherry

Deep taproot (taproots find water sources deep below the soil surface, and are often thick and fleshy, so they can store available water)
Pinus species, Pine
Platanus racemosa, California Sycamore
Populus fremontii, Western Cottonwood
Quercus agrifolia, Coast live oak

Succulent leaves (succulent plants store water in their fleshy leaves, stems and roots)
Agave species, Agave
Cylindropuntia prolifera, Coastal Cholla
Dudleya species, Dudleya
Opuntia species, Prickly pear cactus
Yucca schidigera, Mohave Yucca
Yucca whipplei, Chaparral Candle

Pubescent leaves (pubescent leaves are covered with hairs, which may be tiny or long, and which help hold water and reflect the hot rays of the sun)
Asclepias californica, California Milkweed
Encelia farinosa, Brittlebush
Galvezia speciosa, Island Bush Snapdragon
Malacothamnus fasciculatus, Chaparral Mallow, Bush Mallow
Salvia apiana, White sage

Evergreen, sclerophylous leaves (evergreen leaves stay on the plant year-round; sclerophylous leaves have a hard surface and are frequently closely spaced together)
Arbutus menziesii, Madrone
Baccharis pilularis, Coyote brush
Eriodictyon crassifolium, Thick-laved yerba santa
Heteromeles arbutifolia, Toyon
Malosma laurina, Laurel sumac
Rhamnus species, Coffeeberry
Rhus integrifolia, Lemonadeberry
Rhus ovata, Sugar bush
Salvia leucophylla, Purple sage
Salvia mellifera, Black sage
Sambucus Mexicana, Mexican elderberry

Sources

http://www.cnpssd.org/plantlistlinked.html

 

by Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

GROW! A Garden Festival will be at the Los Angeles Arboretum from May 4-6, 2012 in a celebration of gardening. The Festival will feature favorites
from past LA Garden Shows plus much more!

  • Unique and Unusual Plants for Sale: Fruit trees, herbs, vegetables, succulents, California natives and ornamental favorites from over 25 leading growers and specialty plant societies
  • Marketplace Vendors and Arboretum Garden & Gift Shop
  • 40 vendors showcasing garden tools, books, home gardening accessories, container plants & other botanical inspired items
  • Earth Dreams: Beyond the Sculptural Landscape: an Exhibition of sculptures and art installations curated by Juliet Rosati Bello of Cream Gallery – featuring works by James Hill, Susan Elizalde, Fred Rose, Patrick E., Diana Markessinis, Patrick Crabb, Bill Fillmore and Pamela Burgess
  • Garden Chats: Lectures, Demonstrations and Meet the Experts: Saturday & Sunday only, including featured speakers: Leigh Adams, Marco Barrantes, JoAnn Carey, Rosalind Creasy, Scott Daigre (Tomatomania), Steve Gerischer, Dan Hinkley, John Lyons, Jill Morganelli, Lili Singer, Nicholas Staddon and more!
  • Resources & plant information services provided by environmental and gardening associations
  • Let’s Move! Gardening & Healthy Activities for Kids and Families: Saturday & Sunday: 9:00am – 3:00pm – featuring Sparky the Dragon Pizza Oven
  • Debut of the Newly Designed Garden for All Seasons
  • A demonstration site for small-scale, water-efficient, sustainable gardening and cultivation of fruits and vegetables
  • Educational Landscape Designs from the Association of Professional Landscape Designers California Chapter, Greater Los Angeles District; UCLA Student Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects
  • Food Trucks & Snacks
  • Peacock Café BBQ, The Coffee Gallery, Jamba Juice (South Pasadena ), Kealey’s Poppin’, Mother Moo Creamery, and food trucks – Grilled Cheese, Kabob ‘n Roll, Pie & Burger and Slammin’ Sliders
  • Beer for Books: Friday 5:00 – 8:00pm; Saturday & Sunday 11:00am – 4:30pm, Beer, wine & used book sales to benefit the Arboretum library
  • Live Entertainment, Walking Tours & Artists Painting in the Gardens
  • AND (most importantly) the Botanical Art Exhibition by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California!!
Ad for "Grow! A Garden Festival" at the LA Arboretum

Ad for "Grow! A Garden Festival" at the LA Arboretum

Friday Evening, May 4, 5:00 – 8:00pm – Let the Festivities Begin!
Arboretum Members – Adults: $5 – Children ages 5-12: $1 – under 5 free
Non-Members – Adults: $10 – Children ages 5-12: $2 – under 5 free
Parking: Free parking in Arboretum parking lots
Enjoy the Arboretum during evening hours with live music by Big Band Theory, and first choice of plants and merchandise. Meet the artists. Sample wine flights (additional fee) by Phantom Rivers Winery, accompanied by appetizers from Chef Claud Beltran of Claud & Company Catering, Executive chef of Noir Food & Wine, and signature tequila cocktails (additional fee) created by Nobleza Tequila

Saturday & Sunday May 5 & 6, *9:00am – 4:30pm (*8:00am entry for Arboretum members)
Arboretum Members – Free
Non-Members – Adults: $8 – Seniors & Students: $6 – Children ages 5-12: $3 – under 5 free
Parking: Arboretum lots $10; Santa Anita Race Track (Gate 8) $4 with complimentary shuttle service
Be sure to bring your own cart or wagon to carry all of your purchases

by Deb Shaw

Calochortus amoenus (Rosy Fairy Lantern), watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

Calochortus amoenus (Rosy Fairy Lantern), watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

Joan Keesey, BAGSC member and membership chair, will be having an exhibition of botanical watercolors, “Wild Flowers of Mineral King” at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants (TPF), Friday, March 30 – Saturday, June 30, 2012.

An opening reception for the artist will be held Saturday, March 31, 2012, from 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm.

The opening reception coincides with “Poppy Day” at the TPF, their annual spring plant sale event, which takes place from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm on March 31. Hundreds of different native California species and cultivars will be available to choose from — a great opportunity for those BAGSC members who would like to paint California natives for the Chapman University exhibition on drought-tolerant plants. TPF members will receive 15 percent off all plants in 4-inch containers, one gallon containers and up. Non-members will receive 10 percent off those same plants, and memberships will be sold at the door.

California Buckeye, watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

California Buckeye, watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

The TPF is located at 10459 Tuxford Street, in Sun Valley, California 91352. The phone number is 818.768.5215 and the wildflower hotline number is 818.768.3533.

Davidson's Fritillary, watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

Davidson's Fritillary, watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2012, all rights reserved.

by Deb Shaw

The Arboretum at the University of California, Irvine is presenting its annual Winter Bulb Festival:

Saturday, March 3, 2012: 10 am to 4 pm
Sunday, March 4, 2012: 11 am to 3 pm

The South African bulb garden is in peak bloom, and the Arboretum Nursery will be having a plant sale featuring perennials, succulents and blooming bulbs.

For those BAGSC members interested in drought-tolerant subject matter for the upcoming Chapman University exhibition, this might be a perfect opportunity to acquire some interesting specimens. All those interested in going over after the quarterly BAGSC meeting at Deb’s house can go over as a group.

Admission is $2.00 and parking is free. For more information, call 949.824.5833.

by Deb Shaw

BAGSC members have been invited once again to participate in the 4th Annual WaterMiser Workshop, sponsored by the City of Newport Beach. The workshop will be held at the City of Newport Beach Central Library, on
March 8, 2012
6 – 8 pm
Dinner will be provided by Baja Fresh!

Poster for the City of Newport Beach 4th Annual Water Miser Workshop

Poster for the City of Newport Beach 4th Annual Water Miser Workshop

This year, the keynote speakers are:
Pam Berstler with G3 Green Gardens Group and
Paul Herzog with Surfrider – Ocean Friendly Gardens

As in the past, vendor tables will be set up in the courtyard area, where BAGSC will be demonstrating botanical illustration. Prints and paintings by BAGSC members can be displayed on the easels provided in the lecture area, or on the BAGSC tables in the vendor area. Deb Shaw will be demonstrating and coordinating BAGSC’s participation. Any other BAGSC members that wish to participate are welcome. BAGSC members can demonstrate in the media of their choice, and sell originals, prints and cards, or simply provide artwork to show during the evening. Tania Marien, ArtPlantae will be participating as well.

If any members wish to donate prints, cards, etc. for the raffle it would be most appreciated by the workshop organizers. If you cannot attend the workshop, but wish to either display your artwork, or donate items for the raffle, your work can be brought to Deb’s house at the March 3rd quarterly meeting.

Please RSVP to Deb: 1) if you want to participate the night of the workshop; 2) if you would like to display artwork or prints; 3) if you would like to provide a raffle item.

If friends and family would like to attend the workshop, the public can RSVP at 949.644.3214, or by email to: conservationinfo@newportbeachca.gov.

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