You are currently browsing the monthly archive for February 2020.

by Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

If you have Netflix and are looking for a cute, feel good movie, check out “Dare to be Wild”. It’s a true story about Chelsea Flower show garden designer Mary Reynolds, starring Emma Greenwell, Tom Hughes, and Janie Dee.

Writer and director Vivienne De Courcy was inspired to tell the story when she hired Irish landscape designer Mary Reynolds to design her garden.

by Sally Jacobs, posted by Deb Shaw

Dahlias

Dahlias, watercolor by Sally Jacobs, © 2020

Sally Jacobs has an exhibition of watercolors at the TAG Gallery, entitled California Grown.

The show runs from March 17 – April 11, 2020.

All are invited to the Opening Reception on Saturday March 21, 5-8 pm.

In addition to the exhibition, there will be two workshops and an Artist’s Walkthrough:

Introduction to Botanical Painting
with Sally Jacobs
Tuesday, March 31, 10 am – 12 pm
Contact Sally Jacobs by clicking here.

Introduction to Painting on Yupo
with Shelley Lazarus
Tuesday, March 31, 12 – 2 pm
Contact Shelley Lazarus by clicking here.

Artist Walkthrough
Saturday, April 4, 3 pm

The TAG GALLERY is located at:
5458 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90036
www.taggallery.net · gallery@taggallery.net
(310) 829-9556

Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 5 pm.

Swiss Chard, watercolor by Sally Jacobs, © 2020, all rights reserved.

Swiss Chard, watercolor by Sally Jacobs, © 2020, all rights reserved.

by Nina Antze, posted by Deb Shaw

The Northern California Society of Botanical Artists (NCalSBA) is sponsoring a workshop on Egg Tempera Techniques for Botanical Painting with Carrie Di Costanzo.
Friday, July 24 – Sunday 26, 2020
9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Woodhall
501 Orindawoods
Orinda, California

Cost for 3 day workshop:
$325, NCalSBA member
$350, non member
Included in cost: 3 x 5 inch and 8 x 10 inch panels and paint pigments

Class limit: 16
Sign up by clicking here. It is anticipated that this workshop will fill quickly. Sorry, NCalSBA is unable to refund cancellations unless a waitlisted person is able to take your place.

“Iris II”  Egg Tempera on Panel  17” x 13”, Carrie Di Costanzo, © 2019, all rights reserved.

“Iris II” Egg Tempera on Panel 17” x 13”, Carrie Di Costanzo, © 2019, all rights reserved.

Learn to capture the luminosity of Egg Tempera technique with Carrie Di Costanzo. Egg Tempera is a centuries old painting medium that can be used to render the highly detailed subjects of botanical painting while also effectively creating a radiant and ethereal quality. This workshop will introduce the materials and techniques used to create botanical paintings with egg tempera.

About the instructor:

Carrie Di Costanzo earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. After graduating, she worked as a fashion illustrator before shifting her focus to botanical art in 2008. Carrie has exhibited extensively with the American Society of Botanical Artists and other group exhibitions throughout the US. Her work is held in the Botanical Collections at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, and private collections.

Questions? Contact Susan Mark-Raymond if you have questions or to be placed on a waitlist.

by Deb Shaw

The Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers & Native Plants is currently exhibiting works by Donnett Vanek: “California Wildflowers and Pollinators,” January 18 through April 25, 2020.

Donnett’s exhibition is in the Theodore Payne Gallery at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers & Native Plants
10459 Tuxford Street
Sun Valley, CA
91352
818-768-1802

This is Donnett’s story about the exhibition and her work:

by Donnett Vanek, posted by Deb Shaw

Donnett Vanek, © 2020, all rights reserved: California Thistle Sage; dry brush watercolor  Painted Lady & San Joaquin Milkvetch; dry brush watercolor  Dried Jimsonweed seed pod; graphite

Donnett Vanek, © 2020, all rights reserved. Clockwise from left: California Thistle Sage, dry brush watercolor; Painted Lady & San Joaquin Milkvetch, dry brush watercolor; Dried Jimsonweed seed pod, graphite

Each year the Theodore Payne Arts Council invites three artists whose work reflects the mission of the foundation—to promote and educate the public on California wildflowers and plants. This is a wonderful opportunity for local California artists and is offered every year through the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers & Native Plants (TPF) Arts Program. Information about submissions and the call for art is on the Theodore Payne website Arts Program page.

In fall of 2018, I was invited to have a solo show of my work in January 2020 at Theodore Payne. I chose California Wildflowers & Pollinators as my theme.

The exhibition invitation started me on a year-long journey into a subject I was already interested in. With my camera in hand and my husband accompanying me, I started looking for plants I would like to learn more about and that, through my art, would interest people in the native ecology of California. We went to Carrizo National Plains, hiking in Los Padres National Forest, Wind Wolves Preserve, and the Poppy Preserve in Antelope Valley in search of plants and pollinators. I take my camera when researching native plants in the field, because places like the Carrizo Plains National Monument doesn’t appreciate it when you cut native flowers! So, I take my camera and take many photos from all angles. I then go back and research the plants and insects that I have found and use the photos for reference when rendering the art.

One of the most interesting plants I came across in the Carrizo National Plains was the California Thistle Sage, Salvia carduacea. Although it is called a sage, all sages are actually in the mint family. This plant grew in a huge meadow, alongside San Joaquin Milkvetch, Astragalus asymmetricus. Fluttering between the two plants were Painted Lady butterflies and large red beetles, which I later learned were Little Bear Scarabs, Paracotalpa ursina. These would be the first plants and insects I decided to render for my show. I went on to have a total of 12 artworks of native plants and pollinators. I not only included plants I thought would be unusual to the general public, but also chose to do a rendering of a dandelion, specifically the Spearleaf Mountain Dandelion, which grows in my yard. Like all dandelions, it is an important source of food for all bees and other pollinators. I worked on these pieces throughout 2019. My show at the Theodore Payne Gallery is a reflection of my year long research and rendering of California Wildflowers and Pollinators.

My work is rendered in Dry Brush Water Color, Graphite and Block Print.

Here is my (short) Artist’s Statement;

Donnett Vanek: California Wildflowers and Pollinators

I think of my renderings of California wildflowers and pollinators as portraits. My art is a way to put down on paper what I have observed and depict the never-ending and intriguing variations of color, shape, texture, and size of plants and insects in the natural world. When I observe these plants in their native habitat I’m interested in where they grow, how they grow, how large they grow and the unique relationships they have with pollinators. Through my work, I hope to encourage people to consider the important role that native plants play in the ecology of our California landscape. Look more closely before pulling what you consider to be a weed. It might be the humble Spearleaf Mountain Dandelion. While at first glance, a dandelion may not seem as intriguing as the brightly colored and thorny Thistle Sage, it’s no less important to pollinators and the world of native plants. Go out and enjoy nature, look closely, look down; you just might be stepping on a tiny beautiful flower that you have never seen before.

Click here to see a YouTube video of Donnett’s talk at the opening. (NOTE: It was taken with a phone, and so sometimes is sideways!)

by Monica Ray, posted by Deb Shaw

BAGSC member Monica Ray will be teaching a Two-day Workshop in Colored Pencil at the Inn of Cape May, New Jersey,
May 18 & 19, 2020.
Time: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm (with lunch break)
Cost of two-day workshop: $195.00 (includes packet of different papers and practice pieces)
Class size: limited to 15 students
Registration deadline: April 15, 2020.

Colored Pencil is a versatile medium and lends itself perfectly for nature’s treasures found on the beach, and local coastal plants, capturing their different textures and colors with relative ease. A work in colored pencil can be rendered as a drawing or be closely reminiscent of a work done in watercolor or oil. Learn the techniques for painting in colored pencil and some new tricks along the way.

This workshop is designed for all levels of students, either new or experienced at working in colored pencil. Through demonstrations, discussion of materials, handling properties and techniques, hands-on time, and individual attention, students will develop and improve their skills.

The workshop will be held at the Inn of Cape May (www.innofcapemay.com) in the lovely historic town of Cape May, New Jersey. The inn is right across from the beach overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

On Tuesday, the 19th, an early morning nature walk in the local State Park with a knowledgeable naturalist has been planned—bring binoculars if you plan on attending. Besides drawing and painting, enjoy a stroll on the beach or boardwalk, explore the town, or simply indulge in a quiet moment sitting on the deck and watch a pod of dolphins, swim by in the distance.

Good times are to be had!

Art Retreat in Cape May, Monica Ray, colored pencil, © 2020 all rights reserved.

Art Retreat in Cape May, Monica Ray, colored pencil, © 2020 all rights reserved.

To register, send an email to Monica Ray (click here). Registration is on first-come, first-served basis. Cancellation deadline: April 15, 2020; no refunds after April 15, 2020.

Students are responsible for making their own lodging and transportation arrangements. The Inn of Cape May offers a special rate of $147.95/night (including tax), full breakfast and $40.00/day “inn-money” to spend at the hotel for lunch, dinner, or drinks. Make room reservations as soon as possible and not later than March 31st; mention block #160754.

by Deb Shaw

Akiko Enokido has her first solo botanical art exhibition at the Beijing Botanical Garden, China.

Her 35 original artworks on display were painted from 2005 to 2019, the majority painted in California, Hawaii and Japan.

The exhibition is currently on view at the Beijing Botanical Garden until March 15, 2020.

Images of the exhibition can be viewed here.

 

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