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by guest writer Lisa Reynolds, Public Relations & Marketing Manager, San Diego Botanic Garden, posted by Deb Shaw

Amorphophallus titanium (Corpse Flower) getting ready to bloom at the San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo Credit: Lisa Reynolds.

Amorphophallus titanium (Corpse Flower) getting ready to bloom at the San Diego Botanic Garden.
Photo Credit: Lisa Reynolds, © 2017.

If you have always wanted to see, smell, draw or paint an Amorphophallus titanium, and will be in the San Diego area the weekend of September 16 – 17, 2017, now is your chance! The San Diego Botanic Garden (SDBG) is expecting their Amorphophallus to bloom this coming weekend.

Here is the information sent to us by Lisa Reynolds:

Deathly-smelling Corpse Flower Blooming THIS WEEKEND at San Diego Botanic Garden in Encinitas

This stinky wonder will emit its noxious odor for just over a week. Come and see (and smell) this rare and unusual bloom before it’s gone!!
High-resolution images available at: http://www.sdbgarden.org/media.htm

Characterized by a scent Morticia Addams might use as an intoxicating perfume, the deathly-smelling Amorphophallus titanium, also known as Titan Arum, is expected to be in bloom THIS WEEKEND at San Diego Botanic Garden in Encinitas. The plant will be on public display in SDBG’s Bamboo Garden during regular business hours from 9 am – 5 pm daily. Admission prices are $14 for adults, $10 for students/seniors/military, $8 for children, and no admission charge for children under 2 years of age.

“If there is any plant that creates a stir when in flower, it certainly is the Titan Arum,” says SDBG President & CEO Julian Duval. “One cannot predict when it will bloom. Individual plants only bloom about every 5 to 10 years and from start to finish this amazing plant usually goes through the whole bloom cycle, producing its huge inflorescence in less than 30 days.

“It (Titus Arum bloom) changes almost hourly, so you need to see it in all its stages. Yes, it stinks. But it is also other-worldly beautiful.”

Due to its odor, which smells like a rotting corpse or carcass, the Titan Arum is characterized as a carrion flower. It is best known by its more common name as the ‘Corpse Flower.’ This plant grows in the rainforests of Sumatra. This is a climate that will be replicated at the Garden once our Dickinson Family Education Conservatory is erected in late Spring/early Summer 2018, where the Garden hopes to have the titan arum as part of our permanent display.

Once this plant is in full bloom possibly this Saturday or Sunday, the Corpse Flower will be approximately 4 feet tall and emit its unique stench for only 2 days, so plan ahead because you don’t want to miss it! Today, through the end of this week, the flower will continue to grow approximately 3 inches per day until attaining its peak bloom height and then finally open up to display its full glory.

Edward Read, Manager of the Biology Greenhouse Complex at CSUF, brought this wonderful specimen down to the Garden in his Vanagon! Photo Credit: Megan Andersen, © 2017.

Edward Read, Manager of the Biology Greenhouse Complex at CSUF, brought this wonderful specimen down to the Garden in his Vanagon! Photo Credit: Megan Andersen, © 2017.

This plant is currently on loan from California State University Fullerton (CSUF). Edward Read, Manager of the Biology Greenhouse Complex at CSUF, brought this wonderful specimen down to the Garden – in his Vanagon! – for display at SDBG’s Gala in the Garden that occurred on Saturday, Sept. 9th.

This specimen was grown from seed planted in 2017. The seed was obtained as a collaboration between SDBG, CSUF, Fullerton Arboretum, and community member James Boohman. Mr. Boohman lent his Corpose Flower for display at the garden in 2006. It was pollinated by the staff from Fullerton and Mr. Boohman shared this sAeed with the pollen donors. This is the 12th plant to bloom from seed planted in 2007 by Mr. Read.

Come see – and smell! – this rare and unusual bloom TODAY at San Diego Botanic Garden in Encinitas.

About San Diego Botanic Garden
The San Diego Botanic Garden is a beautiful urban retreat nestled on 37-acres in the midst of Encinitas. Visitors enjoy restful vistas, flowering trees, majestic palms, and the nation’s largest bamboo collection. Thanks to our mild Southern California climate, plants from all over the world thrive here. Our diverse topography provides a wide variety of microclimates giving visitors the sensation of strolling through a tropical rainforest to hiking in the desert. Four miles of trails wind through 29 uniquely themed gardens including the acclaimed Hamilton Children’s Garden. In addition, the Garden regularly offers classes covering many topics including water conservation, fire-safe landscaping, hands-on flower and plant arranging, art in various media, and healthy cooking. Visitors and members also participate in frequent special weekend events and Docent-led tours.

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posted by Deb Shaw

The Los Angeles Times has an article on this Father’s Day by Matt Ritter in the California Journal section, entitled The case of the leaning pine tree: A natural history mystery unfolds on the Central Coast. The story highlights Matt’s research about Cook pine trees, which he discovered all lean towards the equator, no matter where in the world they grow.

Matt is an engaging lecturer and the author of A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us. Matt will be our keynote speaker at BAGSC’s 20th Anniversary Celebration at the Los Angeles Arboretum on August 26, 2017. Come join us for his presentation, our exhibition, and our celebration!

by Lisa Reynolds, Public Relations & Marketing Manager, San Diego Botanic Gardens and Deb Shaw

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

This Sunday, May 7, 2017 at 11 am, the San Diego Botanic Garden will present a rare demonstration by Matt Ritter on how to harvest cork from a live cork oak tree in the grove at the San Diego Botanic Garden.

The cork oak is one of the world’s most interesting and iconic tree species. Commercial cork comes from the thick, spongy, outer bark which is harvested in the tree’s native range in Spain and Portugal. The outer bark of each tree is skillfully and harmlessly stripped off the trunk once every decade, allowing new bark to regrow. Cork oaks are widely grown in California as ornamental trees, but the bark is rarely harvested. The San Diego Botanical Garden has a beautiful grove of cork oak trees that is a perfect place to host this demonstration.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak branch at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Botany Professor Matt Ritter will show how the outer bark of the cork oak is carefully harvested so as to not damage the tree. Using special tools and the same techniques employed by cork harvesters in Portugal, he will demonstrate how this amazing renewable resource can be sustainably harvested. Come see this rare opportunity right here in California!

The San Diego Botanic Gardens are located at 230 Quail Gardens Drive, in Encinitas. Open from 9 am – 5 pm daily; adult admission is $14; seniors, students and active military are $10; children 3 – 18 are $8; and children 2 and under are free. Parking is $2, except for members and for electric vehicles, which are free.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

About Matt Ritter
Matt Ritter is a professor in the Biology Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. He has authored numerous scientific papers and botanical treatments, including the second edition of the “Jepson Manual,” “The Flora of North America Project,” and a “Natural History Guide to San Luis Obispo’s Native Plants.” He is also the author of “A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us,” the state’s most popular natural history guide to the urban forest. He is the California Coordinator of the American Forests Big Tree Registry, and editor-in-chief of Madroño, the journal of the California Botanical Society. He is an avid woodworker and gardener, and spent part of a recent sabbatical in Portugal, the cork oak capital of the world.

And if you would like more Matt Ritter…

Matt Ritter will be the keynote presenter at the 20th Anniversary Botanical Artist Guild of Southern California celebration dinner in August at the Los Angeles County Botanical Gardens & Arboretum. All are invited and we hope to see you there!

by Deb Shaw, from the Illustrators Partnership

For more than a decade, there have been periodic attempts to “bring balance” to copyright policy and law. These efforts have been promoted by large corporations and tech companies, and are a euphemism for the goal of completely upending the premise of copyright law.

As the law now stands, each of us, as artists, own the copyright to our work, even if we do not register it with the copyright office. We created it; it is ours.

Rather than protecting us, the creator and artist, the copyright “reformers” want to make public access to creators’ work the law’s main function. They would require creators to register each and every work in which we wish to retain any commercial or personal interest.

Dr. Carla Hayden, the new Librarian of Congress, suddenly fired Maria Pallante, U.S. Register of Copyrights, at the end of last October, and is now soliciting advice on the “knowledge, skills and abilities” people think the new Register should have. It has been widely reported by credible sources that Dr. Hayden favors looser copyright laws.

Artists, musicians, writers and creators have fought to maintain strong copyright laws each time this has surfaced in the past, and have been successful so far. Now it’s time to make our voices heard again.

Dr. Hayden and the Library of Congress has posted a short survey (only 3 questions). The deadline for responses to the survey is tomorrow, January 31, 2017. It is important, as artists, to respond to this survey with a strong call to retain the full protections of copyright as provided for in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution. If you do not have time to write, the Illustrators’ Partnership has provided suggestions for you to copy and paste.

Here are the links:

 

by Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, posted by Deb Shaw

Website for "Ko; An Ethnobotanical Guide to Hawaiian Sugarcane Varieties," by Noa Kekuewa Lincoln, PhD., © 2016, University of Hawai'i, Manoa, all rights reserved.

Website for “Ko; An Ethnobotanical Guide to Hawaiian Sugarcane Varieties,” by Noa Kekuewa Lincoln, PhD., © 2016, University of Hawai’i, Manoa, all rights reserved.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, will have a pen and ink drawing of Hawaiian Sugar Cane in the forthcoming book Ko; An Ethnobotanical Guide to Hawaiian Sugarcane Varieties. The book will be published by University of Hawaii Press, a nonprofit scholarly publisher.

The author is Noa Kekuewa Lincoln, PhD, Assistant Professor at the University of Hawai’i, Manoa.

About the author of “Ko; An Ethnobotanical Guide to Hawaiian Sugarcane Varieties”
Dr. Noa Kekuewa Lincoln is of native Hawaiian, German, and Japanese decent, born in Kealakekua on Hawai‘i Island. He received his BS in Environmental Engineering from Yale University, and his PhD in Environment and Resources from Stanford University, where his work focused on traditional agricultural development pathways and management strategies. His postdoctoral work examined traditional values and practices of ecosystems for food in Aotearoa. Noa has worked in marine and terrestrial ecosystem restoration and conservation around the Pacific, and has coupled these efforts with cultural and environmental education and community engagement. He has worked on traditional Hawaiian ethnobotany and agriculture and has implemented projects facilitated through a variety of partnerships with community organizations. He is recognized as an emerging expert in Hawaiian crops and cropping systems. His primary interests are in combining traditional and modern knowledge of land management to evaluate social utility, rather than economic, contributions. He is currently a research fellow with Ngai Tahu Research Centre at the University of Canterbury and an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa with a focus on Indigenous Crops and Cropping Systems.

by Joan Keesey and Deb Shaw

Eschscholzia californica, California Poppies, watercolor, © Joan Keesey, 2016, all rights reserved.

Eschscholzia californica, California Poppies, watercolor, © Joan Keesey, 2016, all rights reserved.

Joan Keesey will be exhibiting her botanical watercolors at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants from Saturday, January 21, through Saturday, April 22, 2017.

The exhibition will focus on California native plants blooming in and around the Theodore Payne Foundation and in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Everyone is invited to the opening reception for the exhibition, on Saturday, January 21, 2017, from 1 – 3 pm.

The Theodore Payne Foundation is located at 10459 Tuxford Street, Sun Valley, California 91352, 818.768.1802. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. Theodore Payne is closed Sunday and Monday each week. On-leash dogs are welcome. There is no admission fee.

tpf_single%c2%ad_logoTheodore Payne will be hosting their annual native Winter Plant Sale Thursday – Saturday, January 26 – 28, from 8:30 am – 4:30 pm all three days. Everyone will receive discounts for all three days, plus receive expert advice from Theodore Payne staff and volunteers. Members receive 15 percent off plants, seed and Theodore Payne wear all day. Non-members receive 10 percent off plants, seed and Theodore Payne wear after 11:00 am. Not yet a member? Join at the door! Shop early for best selection.

Bring your own boxes and wagons, see the art exhibition and purchase native California plants.

by Deb Shaw

Plant: Exploring the Botanical World.Plant: Exploring the Botanical World is a beautifully illustrated coffee table book featuring 300 watercolors, drawings, paintings, prints, photographs and micrograph scans of botanical subjects. The book was on display during the portfolio-sharing session at the 2016 American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA) conference in Pittsburgh, and had lines of admirers thumbing through the sample copies.

Many of our ASBA colleagues are featured in Plant: the artwork was selected by a panel of international experts including Dr. James Compton, botanist and plant collector; Charlotte Tancin of the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation; and Patricia Jonas, of  ASBA.

Hailed as “a dazzling collection…that brings the evolution of botanical art right into the 21st century” (Gardens Illustrated), Plant is a wonderful resource for artists, horticulturists, and anyone who appreciates the breathtaking variety of the natural world.

Phaidon, is eager to share Plant with botanical artists and the natural science illustrators. They are extending a limited time special offer: 30% off the purchase price plus free shipping in the United States for arrival in six to seven days. Plant normally retails for $59.95; the special price is $39.95 USD (Amazon is offering the book at a 16% discount, for $50.62).

Use this link to purchase the book and receive the special offer on Phaidon’s website: http://www.phaidon.com/plantoffer/

SPECIFICATIONS:
Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11-3/8 x 9-7/8 in)
Pages: 352 pp
Illustrations: 300 Illustrations
ISBN: 9780714871486

Please contact Ellie Levine, Phaidon Executive Marketing Manager, North America if you know of an institution or organization who would like to receive a complimentary copy of Plant for their library, or if you are interested in purchasing multiple copies of the book.

Thank you to Britt Griswold, Guild of Natural Science Illustrators for letting us know about this wonderful offer!

About Phaidon (from their website):
Phaidon is the premier global publisher of the creative arts with over 1,500 titles in print. We work with the world’s most influential artists, chefs, writers and thinkers to produce innovative books on art, photography, design, architecture, fashion, food and travel, and illustrated books for children. Phaidon is headquartered in London and New York City.

by Ted Tegart, Education Manager, LA Arboretum, and Deb Shaw

93341e17-7042-4d54-98fc-3154362a8b38Jerry Turney is back for his final Tree ID class of the Fall at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden with a new set of 20 trees.

Tree Identification
Dr. Jerrold Turney, Instructor

Saturday: December 3, 2016
10 am – 12 noon
$25 Members / $35 Non-Members (includes Arboretum admission)
To Register please call the Education Department at 626.821.4623 or pay at the class

Do you know the trees of Southern California? We have one of the most diverse urban forests in the USA. This final two hour lecture will cover 15-20 tree species followed by a walk in the Arboretum to see the trees that were covered during the lecture.

Dr. Jerrold Turney, plant pathologist and certified arborist, will teach you to identify trees, their growth habit, their native country, how they should be cared for, any common diseases or insect pests that attack them, and the best place in your garden to plant them.

The Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden is located at: 301 North Baldwin Ave, Arcadia, CA 91007.

About the instructor
Dr. Turney has served as the curator of the camellia gardens at the Huntington Library and Botanic Gardens, a research horticulturist at the Los Angeles County Arboretum, and is currently the plant pathologist for the Department of Agricultural Commissioner/Weights and Measures for the County of Los Angeles.

by Ted Tegart, posted by Deb Shaw

Trees at the LA Arboretum. © 2016, LA Arboretum.

Trees at the LA Arboretum. © 2016, LA Arboretum.

Dr. Jerrold Turney is back at the Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden for his second Tree Identification class of the Fall. Dr. Turney has a completely new set of 20 trees to cover this
Saturday, November 5, 2016
10 am – 12 noon
$25 Members / $35 Non-Members (includes Arboretum admission)
To Register please call the Education Department at 626.821.4623 or pay at the class.

Southern California has one of the most diverse urban forests in the United States. This class will cover about 20 different trees on each of three Saturdays for a total of 60 trees. Each two hour lecture will cover 15-20 tree species followed by a walk in the Arboretum to see the trees that were covered during the lecture. Register for one or both remaining classes.

Jerry Turney, plant pathologist and certified arborist, will teach tree identification, their growth habit, their native country, how they should be cared for, any common diseases or insect pests that attack them, and the best place in the garden to plant them.

The last class will be held Saturday, December 3, 2016.

Questions? Contact LA Arboretum Education Manager Ted Tegart via email or by calling 626.821.4624. The LA Arboretum is located at: 301 North Baldwin Ave, Arcadia, CA 91007, 626.821.3222.

Dr. Turney has served as the curator of the camellia gardens at the Huntington Library and Botanic Gardens, a research horticulturist at the Los Angeles County Arboretum, and is currently the plant pathologist for the Department of Agricultural Commissioner/Weights and Measures for the County of Los Angeles. 

by Veronica Raymond and Deb Shaw

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens has created an internal online resource for staff and volunteers for What’s In Bloom! [Click on the title to be connected to the link.]

Although this in-house resource is not generally available to the public, Jim Folsom, the Marge & Sherm Telleen/Earle & Marion Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens, has shared the link to this fabulous site for use by botanical artists.

Thank you to Jim and his team for producing this valuable resource!

by Janice Sharp

Eucalyptus forrestiana, photo courtesy of Australian Native Plants, © 2016.

Eucalyptus forrestiana, photo courtesy of Australian Native Plants, © 2016.

Unfortunately, due to unforeseen circumstances, the Australian Native Plants Fall Plant Yard Sale has been cancelled. Australian Native Plants is still open by appointment, however, and they have a wonderful selection of Australian and South African native plants, from ground covers to trees and everything in between. They also have a great selection of pots, furniture and gifts.

Australian Native Plants is located at 9040 North Ventura Avenue, Casitas Springs, CA 93001. (The nursery entrance is off of Nye Road.) Make an appointment via email, or by calling 805.649.3362.

 

 

by Janice Sharp

Poster for California Native Plant Society Plant Sale.

Poster for California Native Plant Society Plant Sale.

The San Gabriel Mountain chapter of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is having its annual plant sale in time for fall planting:
Saturday, November 5, 9 am – 2pm
Eaton Canyon Nature Center

If you are interested in drawing and painting California native plants and growing them in your garden, the San Gabriel Mountain chapter of CNPS has a variety of plants and wildflower seeds that grow in the Los Angeles basin. The 1,900 plants available for sale include plants that attract birds and butterflies.

Download an 8-1/2 x 11 poster advertising the plant sale (shown at left): cnps-plant-sale.
Download a preview of the plant list: cnpssgm_preview_160710.

The plant sale is located at the Eaton Canyon Nature Center, at 1750 North Altadena Drive, Pasadena 91107-1046.

by Janice Sharp

Save The Date postcard for the Fall Plant Sale at Australian Native Plants.

Save The Date postcard for the Fall Plant Sale at Australian Native Plants.

Jo O’Connel’s Australian Native Plants is having a sale of a collection of fabulous, exotic plants, as well as pots and furniture:
Saturday, October 8, 9 am – 5 pm, and
Sunday, October 9, 9 am – 4 pm

Eucalyptus forrestiana, photo courtesy of Australian Native Plants, © 2016.

Eucalyptus forrestiana, photo courtesy of Australian Native Plants, © 2016.

Be sure to look at their website to view photographs of the extraordinary plants that are available. Australian Native Plants is located at 9040 North Ventura Avenue, Casitas Springs, CA 93001. Phone is toll Free: (800) 701 6517, or local: (805) 649 3362. Although the address is on North Ventura, you have to go in through the back from Nye Road.

Questions? Jo can be reached by her email form on their website.

by Deb Shaw

A New Blue

Blue pigment discovered at Professor Subramanian's lab at Oregon Stste University. Photo from Oregon State University.

Blue pigment discovered at Professor Subramanian’s lab at Oregon Stste University. Photo from Oregon State University.

Professor Mas Subramanian is a professor of materials science at Oregon State University, researching new materials that could be used in electronics. In 2009, one of his grad students, Andrew E. Smith took a mixture out of the furnace that had been heated to more than 2,000 Fahrenheit and found it had turned a brilliant, clear blue color. They had accidentally, serendipitously discovered a new blue pigment; the first new blue in more than 200 years. The last “new inorganic blue” to be manufactured was Cobalt Blue in the early 1800’s. Cobalt, however, was not lightfast and was toxic to boot.

Considered a “complex inorganic pigment,” the new blue is currently called YInMn blue, named for its chemical makeup of yttrium, indium and manganese oxides.

Subramanian, Smith and Oregon State University chemistry professor Arthur Sleight patented the YInMn material; Shepherd Color, an industrial pigment distributor is testing out the pigment’s application. Once the Environmental Protection Agency approves the color for commercial manufacturing, Shepherd is licensed to sell the pigment. So far, YInMn has proven to reflect heat more than Cobalt Blue and has proven to be remarkably stable; holding up against oil, water and sunlight better than other available blues. In addition to being light safe, none of the ingredients are toxic.

Once large manufacturers are using a pigment, the material trickles down to our art supplies. Keep your eyes open in the next few years for a brand new blue, which will most likely receive a sexier name for marketing purposes. And the team of “new blue” researchers are already working to create new colors by altering the mixture. They have created a purple by adding titanium and zinc and are expecting additional bright, vivid colors to follow.

National Public Radio (NPR) has an article online with interesting links about the new blue from July 16, 2016. Oregon State University has an in depth article about it as well.

Late Summer “Reads”: Links to Books and Online Articles and Podcasts about Color

Now that we’re hitting the dog days of summer, here are some interesting books, links and podcasts about color:

NPR has a series of free podcasts about color, called Color Decoded: Stories that Span the Spectrum. Read the articles, or listen or download them all from the link, or individually from any of the links below. Many of the following (in reverse order) are only a few minutes long, so queue them all up. Some of them have been featured on our BAGSC News blog previously. They’re fun listening while painting or drawing:

Each of the individual articles have links to other resources and stories about color: TED Talks, podcasts and news articles. It’s easy to journey deep into online color discoveries.

For those who prefer spending the end of summer curled up with a good book, here are a very few great reads about colors:

  • A Perfect Red: Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire, Amy Butler Greenfield, ISBN-10: 0060522763
  • A Red Like No Other: How Cochineal Colored the World, Carmella Padilla and Barbara Anderson, ISBN-10: 0847846431
  • Mauve: How One Man Invented a Color That Changed the World, Simon Garfield, ISBN-10: 0393323137
  • Color: A Natural History of the Palette, Victoria Finlay, ISBN-10: 0812971426
  • The Brilliant History of Color in Art, Victoria Finlay, ISBN-10: 1606064290
  • Rarest Blue: The Remarkable Story of an Ancient Color Lost to History and Rediscovered, Baruch Sterman, ISBN-10: 0762782226

Have a favorite book about the history of a color? Let us know in the “Comments” section.

Enjoy!

by Deb Shaw

Not too long after Jim Folsom, published his free ebook, “A Botanical Reader for the Curious Gardener,” in February 2016, it mysteriously disappeared from iBooks, much to the disappointment of those who hadn’t yet had a chance to download it. The problem turned out to be some technical glitches.

Cover, "A Botanical Reader for the Curious Gardener", James P. Folsom, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Cover, “A Botanical Reader for the Curious Gardener”, James P. Folsom, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Jim used the opportunity to issue version 1.2 of “A Botanical Reader” as they got the ebook back online. The new version includes edits, expansion of the Botanical Calendar, and an enlarged Plant Trivia TimeLine.

BAGSC News covered the initial launch of “A Botanical Reader” [read the full article at: https://bagscblog.com/2016/03/04/a-botanical-reader-by-jim-folsom-now-available-in-ibooks/]

The ebook is downloadable for free through iTunes/iBooks, at https://itun.es/us/XDT5ab.l  It’s listed in the category of Life Sciences, and is available on the iPad, iPhone and Mac. Search in iBooks under “A Botanical Reader” or “James P. Folsom” and it will come right up. The print length is 332 pages. 

About the Author
James P. (Jim) Folsom, PhD., rides the demographic peak of baby boomers, having been born in southeastern Alabama in 1950. His lifelong love of plants is reflected in a BS in Botany from Auburn University, an MA in Biology from Vanderbilt University, and a PhD in research botany from The University of Texas at Austin. Though his research has centered on the orchid family, with much of the research time spent in Tropical America (including a year in Colombia on a Fulbright Pre-Doctoral Fellowship), Jim’s botanical interests are wide-ranging. As Curator of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington in San Marino, CA, he dedicates much of his effort to educational programs that increase public interest and understanding of the science, culture, and history of plants and gardens. He lives at The Huntington with his wife, Debra (also a botanist) and children Molly and Jimmy. Jim was recognized as a Friend of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America in 1996, a Member-at-Large of the Garden Club of America in 1998, and presented a Professional Citation by the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta in 1999. The Garden Club of America awarded him their Medal of Honor in 2007.

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