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by Lesley Randall, posted by Deb Shaw

In preparation for the upcoming BAGSC Exhibition, Ficus at San Diego Botanic Garden, here is a bit of information about this extraordinary group of plants.

We’ll start with the one most of us know best: the edible fig. Ficus carica, has been in cultivation since ancient times. Though humans typically eat only this species of Fig, others are considered to be keystone species in their habitats, providing food (leaves as well as figs) and shelter for a wide variety of mammals, birds and insects. Several species are plants of special significance in many cultures. For example, Ficus religiosa, the Bo Tree, is said to be the tree under which Buddha sat while gaining enlightenment.

Some figs are cauliflorous, a botanical term for plants which have flowers and fruits growing directly from their main stems or woody trunks rather than from new growth. The word comes from Latin. Caulis means trunk or stem and Flory means flower. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

Some figs are cauliflorous, a botanical term for plants which have flowers and fruits growing directly from their main stems or woody trunks rather than from new growth. The word comes from Latin. Caulis means trunk or stem and Flory means flower. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

The genus Ficus is a member of the Moraceae, or Mulberry Family. There are more than 800 species of Ficus. Most are tropical, but there are some species that survive in more temperate zones, such as the edible fig. The genus is highly diverse, with species growing as epiphytes, massive banyans, stranglers, shrubs, caudiciforms, vines and small trees. They are found from rainforests to dry rocky deserts.

 

So what makes a Ficus a Ficus?

Ficus auriculatus cut to reveal the interior and white latex. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

Ficus auriculatus cut to reveal the interior and white latex. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

There are a couple of key characteristics that separate this group. First is the unusual flower/fruit arrangement—the fig itself. Known as a syconium in botanical lingo, the fig is an urn-shaped structure lined with tiny flowers on the inside. The flowers are pollinated by a specialized group of wasps that enter the syconium through an opening called an ostiole.

The second key characteristic are the paired stipules that enclose the developing leaf. Though these often drop off as the leaf begins to unfold, they leave a distinct scar at the base of the leaf. The stipules may be separate, or fused into one structure.

The third key characteristic is the sap: a striking white or yellow latex.

Other characteristics to note are: an alternate leaf arrangement, and typically, pinnate venation. All figs share these characteristics that, combined, distinguish them from other plant genera. How these characters are expressed are what makes the group so interesting. The syconium can be as large as a baseball or less than a centimeter wide. It may be scaled or smooth, sessile or stalked and borne in leaf axils or on the main branches and trunk (cauliflorous.) The leaves are typically entire, but several species have lobed leaves. Leaves may be thick and tough, light and delicate, very large or very small. The bark can be smooth, rough, or in the case of a couple Australian species, corky and fire retardant.

Ficus with stipules and scars. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

Ficus with stipules and scars. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

Where to find Ficus in Southern California?
The Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden, San Diego Zoo, and San Diego Botanic Garden all have nice collections. The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens have some as well. They also can be found in parks, lining city streets, in back yards, as house plants, in nurseries and as Bonsai specimens.

Want to learn more? Check out Fig Web which has information on specific species as well as general information on the group. BAGSC members who are interested in organizing and/or attending expeditions to find and paint specimens should let us know your interest and stay tuned!

Information about the Ficus exhibition at the San Diego Botanic Garden can be found on BAGSC’s website. Information about the “Call for Entries” can be found on the “Members Only” page of the BAGSC website.

Ficus religiosa, the Bo Tree, with reddish new growth. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

Ficus religiosa, the Bo Tree, with reddish new growth. Photo by Lesley Randall, © 2017.

by Janice Sharp, posted by Deb Shaw

Artwork hanging above the card catalog in the Arboretum Library. Artists are: (L to R) Diane Nelson Daly, Deborah Shaw, and Estelle DeRidder. Photo by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

Artwork hanging above the card catalog in the Arboretum Library. Artists are: (L to R) Diane Nelson Daly, Deborah Shaw, and Estelle DeRidder. Photo by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art, is now open at the Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden. The exhibition, featuring Southern Californian urban trees, is now hanging in the Arboretum’s library and includes 29 artworks by 17 BAGSC artists. The exhibition is being held in conjunction with BAGSC’s 20th anniversary celebration.

Photo by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

Photo by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

BAGSC artists in the exhibition include: Diane Nelson Daly, Estelle DeRidder, Cynthia Jackson, Susan Jackson, Clara Josephs, Suzanne Kuuskmae, Patricia A. Mark, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Terri Munroe, Marilyn Anne Parino, Veronica Raymond, Olga Ryabtsova, Mitsuko Schultz, Gilly Shaeffer, Janice Sharp, Deborah Shaw, and Jude Wiesenfeld.

Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art will run from July 6, 2017 to September 28, 2017.

A collage of artwork in the exhibition in The Arboretum Library. Photo collage by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

A collage of artwork in the exhibition in The Arboretum Library. Photo collage by Janice Sharp, © 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join BAGSC members for our 20th Anniversary Celebration at The Arboretum

On Saturday, August 26, BAGSC will celebrate their 20th Anniversary. The program for the celebration will be:

4:00 – 4:45 p.m.
“Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art” Exhibition by BAGSC Members • Tour of the exhibition includes light refreshments and comments by the artists and Matt Ritter, our guest speaker.

5:00 – 5:45 p.m.
Presentation by Matt Ritter, botanist and author of A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Buffet Dinner • Highlights of BAGSC’s 20-year history

BAGSC members and their guests are invited to the programs and the dinner for $60 per person. Admission to The Arboretum is free; please see the Visitor’s Center attendant for free admission to the Arboretum Gardens for BAGSC guests.

Please email Gilly Shaeffer to RSVP with your name, phone number and the number in your party. Gilly will send an email reply to let you know where to send your check, payable to BAGSC, by August 15.

Los Angeles County Arboretum members and others who would like to attend only the exhibition tour and Matt Ritter presentation (but not the dinner) are welcome to join us for that part of the program. Arboretum members are $10; non-members are $15, payable at the door. There is no additional charge for Arboretum admission.

The 2017 Summer/Fall issue of The Arboretum's magazine has a page featuring the upcoming exhibitions in The Arboretum's library.

The 2017 Summer/Fall issue of The Arboretum’s magazine has a page featuring the upcoming exhibitions in The Arboretum’s library.

The Urban Forest exhibition can be seen with admission to The Arboretum during regular business hours in The Arboretum’s Library. There are no additional charges. The Arboretum is located at: 301 North Baldwin Avenue, Arcadia CA 91007-2697.

by Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

The background and basic plant shapes are blocked in. Notes and reference photos are taped on the beginnings of the mural.

The background and basic plant shapes are blocked in. Notes and reference photos are taped on the beginnings of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

BAGSC member Estelle DeRidder has been painting a mural at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. She has been working on the wall for the past couple of weeks, but has done a great deal of planning previously.

I have been following the progress of the mural. The first time I saw it, the background was in and Estelle was beginning to paint in the big plants, but I couldn’t take any pictures as I had forgotten my iPad.

This past weekend, there were many more plants blocked in, and places were earmarked where more plants would go.

I will be keeping everyone up-to-date about Estelle’s botanical mural as the work progresses. More plants will continue to be blocked in, after which details will be added, including insects, animals and birds.

You can visit Estelle and the mural at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. The Madrona Marsh is located at 3201 Plaza del Amo, Torrance, CA 90503, 310-782-3989.

Another section of the mural, with reference photos. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Another section of the mural, with reference photos. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

The Madrona Marsh is open free to the public, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, excluding holidays. Because most of the Marsh is staffed by volunteers, and because weather can be a factor, the times the Marsh and Nature Center is open is subject to change. Please call (310) 782-3989 before visiting to make sure the Marsh is open. 

Another section of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Another section of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Andrew Mitchell (left) and Janice Sharp (right) mark the wall for hanging the paintings.

Andrew Mitchell (left) and Janice Sharp (right) mark the wall for hanging the paintings.

by Janice Sharp and Deb Shaw

The first art exhibition by the Botanical Artist Guild of Southern California in the Brody Botanical Center at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens has been hung… and it is beautiful!

This show, Inspired by California, features plants that are both indigenous to California as well as plants that have become synonymous with California.

Janice Sharp hanging one of the selected artworks.

Janice Sharp hanging one of the selected artworks.

Thirteen of the entrants were selected for hanging. We congratulate Diane Nelson Daly, Estelle DeRidder, Patricia Mark, Terri Munroe, Gilly Schaffer, Deborah Shaw, Mitsuko Schultz, Janice Sharp, Beth Stone, Ellie Tu and Jude Wiesenfeld on their outstanding submissions.

We thank The Huntington for the exhibit space, Jim Folsom for the inspiration that resulted in the exhibition, Robert Hori for the inception and logistics, Andrew Mitchell for the designing and hanging of the exhibit and Melanie Thorpe for all the details.

Andrew Mitchell with final exhibition display.

Andrew Mitchell with final exhibition display.

Inspired by California will run from June 1, 2017 to August 15, 2017.  Current and future exhibitions in the Brody Botanical Center will coincide with events and seasons at The Huntington.

In September, Inspired by Latin America will take the place of the current exhibition. Inspired by Latin America will shown from September 1, 2017 to January 15, 2018. BAGSC member entries will be due no later than August 1, 2017. See the “Call for Entries” page in the “Members Only” section of the BAGSC website for further details.

Inspired by California can be seen with admission to The Huntington during regular business hours. There are no additional charges. The exhibition is in the main lobby area of the Brody Botanical Center. The Huntington is located at: 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA 91108.

"Inspired by California" by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California, in the Brody Botanical Center at The Huntington.

“Inspired by California” by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California, in the Brody Botanical Center at The Huntington. Signage about the paintings and information about BAGSC was added after this photo was taken.

posted by Deb Shaw

The Los Angeles Times has an article on this Father’s Day by Matt Ritter in the California Journal section, entitled The case of the leaning pine tree: A natural history mystery unfolds on the Central Coast. The story highlights Matt’s research about Cook pine trees, which he discovered all lean towards the equator, no matter where in the world they grow.

Matt is an engaging lecturer and the author of A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us. Matt will be our keynote speaker at BAGSC’s 20th Anniversary Celebration at the Los Angeles Arboretum on August 26, 2017. Come join us for his presentation, our exhibition, and our celebration!

posted by Deb Shaw

http://www.bagsc.org/index.php/exhibitions

Descanso Gardens had perfect specimens of California native plants on the demonstration tables, with the botanical and common names on tags.

The most recent of BAGSC’s ongoing exhibitions at the Descanso Gardens opened on Friday May 19, 20017. The theme of the show is California Natives.

On the May 20 and 21 weekend, BAGSC held botanical art demonstrations in the Boddy House in conjunction with the exhibition opening and the Rose Festival at Descanso. Thank you Estelle DeRidder, Mitsuko Schultz and Janice Sharp for demonstrating botanical art and talking with the public.

Upon arrival at the Body House the demonstration artists were presented with fresh-cut California native flowers in vases on our cloth-covered tables. Each flower had a tag printed with its common name as well as its botanical name. Each was a perfect example of the species.

The continuous stream of visitors to the Boddy House were very enthusiastic about the art and the Native Plants on the table.

Docents at the Boddy House were very excited and complementary about our art and enjoyed seeing the change over of art. (They keep tabs on the exhibitions.)

The BAGSC sign at the beginning of the exhibition gives information about our organization and mission.

The BAGSC sign at the beginning of the exhibition gives information about our organization and mission.

The Boddy House at Descanso Gardens is open daily (except Mondays) from 10 am to 4 pm (the gardens are open daily 9-5).

The California Native Plants show runs until May 2018. The next BAGSC Descanso Garden show theme will be Plants from a Japanese Garden and will run from March, 2018 to March, 2019. Entries are due no later than February 12, 2018. Visit the BAGSC Exhibitions page for more details.

Happy painting.

Hanging along wall in the Boddy House at Descanso Gardens.

Hanging along wall in the Boddy House at Descanso Gardens.

By Jude Wiesenfeld, posted by Deb Shaw

Lee McCaffree (left) and Pat Mark (right); photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Lee McCaffree (left) and Pat Mark (right); photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

BAGSC held a one day class with botanical artist (and BAGSC member), Lee McCaffree, at The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens on May 6, 2017 on “Leaf Detail: Start to Finish, Veins and Edges”.

Susan Jackson; photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Susan Jackson, enjoying her leaf studies; photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Lee stayed with Pat Mark, who also acted as her assistant in the class, arranging for specimens, distributing hand-outs, etc. We brought our lunch, which was a very good idea, as there turned out to be a special film event at The Huntington that took over the Brody side parking lot and added to the crowd.

Lee is a very affable teacher and took time with every student checking their work on the assignments. She began showing us examples of different leaf vein patterns and margin (edges) patterns. We divided our watercolor paper into sections and worked on different techniques in an effort to decide which ones we preferred.

I liked leaving the whites of the veins, rather than “lifting” or “masking” the veins. Lee also suggested tools that would best suit rendering our veins and edges for the best results.

We hope Lee will join us again in future. All of us enjoyed meeting her and enjoyed the class very much.

Class members, © 2017.

Class members, © 2017.

Kat Powell (left) and Estelle De Ridder (right); photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Kat Powell (left) and Estelle De Ridder (right); photo by Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

Jude Wiesenfeld, © 2017.

by Lisa Reynolds, Public Relations & Marketing Manager, San Diego Botanic Gardens and Deb Shaw

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

This Sunday, May 7, 2017 at 11 am, the San Diego Botanic Garden will present a rare demonstration by Matt Ritter on how to harvest cork from a live cork oak tree in the grove at the San Diego Botanic Garden.

The cork oak is one of the world’s most interesting and iconic tree species. Commercial cork comes from the thick, spongy, outer bark which is harvested in the tree’s native range in Spain and Portugal. The outer bark of each tree is skillfully and harmlessly stripped off the trunk once every decade, allowing new bark to regrow. Cork oaks are widely grown in California as ornamental trees, but the bark is rarely harvested. The San Diego Botanical Garden has a beautiful grove of cork oak trees that is a perfect place to host this demonstration.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak branch at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Botany Professor Matt Ritter will show how the outer bark of the cork oak is carefully harvested so as to not damage the tree. Using special tools and the same techniques employed by cork harvesters in Portugal, he will demonstrate how this amazing renewable resource can be sustainably harvested. Come see this rare opportunity right here in California!

The San Diego Botanic Gardens are located at 230 Quail Gardens Drive, in Encinitas. Open from 9 am – 5 pm daily; adult admission is $14; seniors, students and active military are $10; children 3 – 18 are $8; and children 2 and under are free. Parking is $2, except for members and for electric vehicles, which are free.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

Cork oak trunk at San Diego Botanic Garden. Photo by Deb Shaw, © 2014.

About Matt Ritter
Matt Ritter is a professor in the Biology Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. He has authored numerous scientific papers and botanical treatments, including the second edition of the “Jepson Manual,” “The Flora of North America Project,” and a “Natural History Guide to San Luis Obispo’s Native Plants.” He is also the author of “A Californian’s Guide to the Trees Among Us,” the state’s most popular natural history guide to the urban forest. He is the California Coordinator of the American Forests Big Tree Registry, and editor-in-chief of Madroño, the journal of the California Botanical Society. He is an avid woodworker and gardener, and spent part of a recent sabbatical in Portugal, the cork oak capital of the world.

And if you would like more Matt Ritter…

Matt Ritter will be the keynote presenter at the 20th Anniversary Botanical Artist Guild of Southern California celebration dinner in August at the Los Angeles County Botanical Gardens & Arboretum. All are invited and we hope to see you there!

by Nancy Beckham, posted by Deb Shaw

Artwork on postcard: Slipper Orchid Maudiae, © 2017, Kathy Morgan

Artwork on postcard: Slipper Orchid Maudiae, © 2017, Kathy Morgan

The Botanical Art and Illustration Class of the Los Angeles County Arboretum is proud to announce their Second ARTboretum Art show, an annual art exhibit and sale to be held Friday April 28 through Sunday, April 30 from 10 am – 4:30 pm, and 10:00 am until 2:00 pm on Sunday. Last year’s first event was an amazing success, with more than 60 works of framed art available for purchase, demonstrations, a reception, and sales of beautiful cards and prints of the artists work. More than 700 people attended this three-day event.

ARTboretum is back this year, with exciting hands-on demonstrations so the public can experience the thrill of drawing and painting plants. Framed or unframed originals and fine art giclées, cards and prints of the work will be available for purchase just before Mothers’ Day. The artists will be on hand to welcome the public and to share their knowledge and love of their art. A reception for the artists will be held on Saturday, April 29 from 1 – 3 pm in the Oak Room.

The LA County Arboretum and Botanic Garden is located at 301 North Baldwin Avenue in Arcadia. Hope to see you at this exciting event in April.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Save-the-date postcard, designed by Jan and Chas Clouse, featuring Gilly Shaeffer's watercolor of a California native walnut, © 2017.

Save-the-date postcard, designed by Jan and Chas Clouse, featuring Gilly Shaeffer’s watercolor of a California native walnut, © 2017.

The Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. Mark your calendars–on August 26, 2017, the Guild will be having a gala celebration in honor of our Anniversary.

Since its inception in 1997, our group has grown, changed and keeps getting better. So, we have good reason to celebrate. Members continue to develop their botanical art skills through classes and workshops, and, as a result of this dedication and hard work, we have more and more opportunities to show our art. Through outreach, exhibition and educational activities, BAGSC has increased southern Californian’s awareness and appreciation for this art form.

We have many activities planned in honor of our 20-year milestone.

The Los Angeles Arboretum Library, one of our earliest supporters, will be hosting a BAGSC exhibition, entitled “Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art”. The exhibition will feature trees that grow in Mediterranean climates. Opening in early July, 2017, the exhibition will run until the end of September.

On August 26 we will hold a 20th Anniversary Celebration at the Los Angeles Arboretum:

4:00 – Artists will lead a tour of the exhibition and discuss the art.

5:00 – A special presentation will be given by Matt Ritter, author of A Californian’s Guide to Trees Among Us. Matt is a professor at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, a tree expert and a photographer. This promises to be a delightful and informative presentation.

6:00 – The Anniversary Dinner will be held at the Peacock Café Patio at sunset. Olga Eysymontt, long time botanical art instructor, will share memories of BAGSC beginnings and how botanical art got started in Los Angeles. And there will be opportunities for all to connect with old friends and meet new ones.

Invitations to this special event will be available soon. The suggested donation for attending is $60.

Keep your eyes open for invitations and more information. Entries for the exhibition at the LA Arboretum Library, “Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art” are due May 12, 2017. The “Call for Entries” can be found on the BAGSC website Exhibitions page and in the Members Only section. Questions on the exhibition? Please contact Janice Sharp. Questions about the 20th Anniversary Celebration? Please contact Gilly Shaeffer.

bagsc20thCMYKWe are looking forward to sharing a beautiful afternoon and evening with members, friends, family, special guests from the Los Angeles botanical gardens community and more. We hope all will join us for this magical anniversary celebration.

 

by Deb Shaw, from the Illustrators Partnership

For more than a decade, there have been periodic attempts to “bring balance” to copyright policy and law. These efforts have been promoted by large corporations and tech companies, and are a euphemism for the goal of completely upending the premise of copyright law.

As the law now stands, each of us, as artists, own the copyright to our work, even if we do not register it with the copyright office. We created it; it is ours.

Rather than protecting us, the creator and artist, the copyright “reformers” want to make public access to creators’ work the law’s main function. They would require creators to register each and every work in which we wish to retain any commercial or personal interest.

Dr. Carla Hayden, the new Librarian of Congress, suddenly fired Maria Pallante, U.S. Register of Copyrights, at the end of last October, and is now soliciting advice on the “knowledge, skills and abilities” people think the new Register should have. It has been widely reported by credible sources that Dr. Hayden favors looser copyright laws.

Artists, musicians, writers and creators have fought to maintain strong copyright laws each time this has surfaced in the past, and have been successful so far. Now it’s time to make our voices heard again.

Dr. Hayden and the Library of Congress has posted a short survey (only 3 questions). The deadline for responses to the survey is tomorrow, January 31, 2017. It is important, as artists, to respond to this survey with a strong call to retain the full protections of copyright as provided for in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution. If you do not have time to write, the Illustrators’ Partnership has provided suggestions for you to copy and paste.

Here are the links:

 

by Deb Shaw

Plant: Exploring the Botanical World.Plant: Exploring the Botanical World is a beautifully illustrated coffee table book featuring 300 watercolors, drawings, paintings, prints, photographs and micrograph scans of botanical subjects. The book was on display during the portfolio-sharing session at the 2016 American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA) conference in Pittsburgh, and had lines of admirers thumbing through the sample copies.

Many of our ASBA colleagues are featured in Plant: the artwork was selected by a panel of international experts including Dr. James Compton, botanist and plant collector; Charlotte Tancin of the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation; and Patricia Jonas, of  ASBA.

Hailed as “a dazzling collection…that brings the evolution of botanical art right into the 21st century” (Gardens Illustrated), Plant is a wonderful resource for artists, horticulturists, and anyone who appreciates the breathtaking variety of the natural world.

Phaidon, is eager to share Plant with botanical artists and the natural science illustrators. They are extending a limited time special offer: 30% off the purchase price plus free shipping in the United States for arrival in six to seven days. Plant normally retails for $59.95; the special price is $39.95 USD (Amazon is offering the book at a 16% discount, for $50.62).

Use this link to purchase the book and receive the special offer on Phaidon’s website: http://www.phaidon.com/plantoffer/

SPECIFICATIONS:
Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11-3/8 x 9-7/8 in)
Pages: 352 pp
Illustrations: 300 Illustrations
ISBN: 9780714871486

Please contact Ellie Levine, Phaidon Executive Marketing Manager, North America if you know of an institution or organization who would like to receive a complimentary copy of Plant for their library, or if you are interested in purchasing multiple copies of the book.

Thank you to Britt Griswold, Guild of Natural Science Illustrators for letting us know about this wonderful offer!

About Phaidon (from their website):
Phaidon is the premier global publisher of the creative arts with over 1,500 titles in print. We work with the world’s most influential artists, chefs, writers and thinkers to produce innovative books on art, photography, design, architecture, fashion, food and travel, and illustrated books for children. Phaidon is headquartered in London and New York City.

by Teri Kuwahara, posted by Deb Shaw

 

‘Violetta’ artichokes by Pria Graves. © 2016.

‘Violetta’ artichokes by Pria Graves. © 2016.

A friend of mine is a Master Gardener and sent me this article which may be of interest. Pria Graves, from the Northern California Society of Botanical Artists was interviewed by Teresa O’Conner of the UC Food Observer for an online article titled The Art of Plants.

The article contains a lot of information, with links to great resources and additional information.

by Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

BAGSC member Steve Hampson loves Sweet Peas and Daffodils. Diane Daly found a YouTube video of Steve from Roger’s Gardens. Enjoy!

by Melanie Campbell-Carter, posted by Deb Shaw

John Pastoriza-Piñol demonstrating ellipses.

John Pastoriza-Piñol demonstrating ellipses. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

The renowned Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens provided fourteen BAGSC members with a three-day Master Class with John Pastoriza-Pinol on November 8 – 10, 2016. The Huntington offered us exquisite Paphiopedilum specimens from the Conservatory and greenhouses for our subjects. Kudos to Melanie Thorpe of The Huntington, and BAGSC Education Chair Jude Wiesenfeld, for flawless organization on this long-anticipated workshop.

Quoting participant Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, “We learned so many new techniques:

  1. Using ellipses to find the proper placement of a plant on the paper.
  2. Using abundant masking fluid to keep the areas between washes pristine.
  3. Using many layers of pale colors to build to unique darker colors.
  4. Using brushes like blenders, spotters and a Neef comb to complete the painting.”

Reactions to the experience by participating artists included,

Using abundant masking fluid. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

Using abundant masking fluid. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

“Combing is my new favorite thing!” Cynthia Jackson

“Watching John develop the orchid painting was truly an inspiration.” Gilly Shaeffer

“(John) will rewet six or seven times before he starts dry brush work and a total of maybe 30 layers to the final work. I am so happy to have learned about his methods.” Leslie Walker

“I never named my orchid but after all those pastel washes I named my painting…my pretty pony!” Beth Stone

John Pastoriza-Piñol demonstrating to class participants. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

John Pastoriza-Piñol demonstrating to class participants. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

The students coordinated a “paint share” for John’s materials list, courtesy of BAGSC member/artist Beth Stone. As an unexpected bonus, Robert Hori of The Huntington graciously shared several prints from the Estate of Rory McEwen with the class. BAGSC member/artist Mitsuko Schultz shared several books, including the new publication, Flora Japonica, from the current exhibition at the Shirley Sherwood Gallery at the Kew Gardens, which she attended two months ago.

John is currently enjoying an extended stay in the US on a grant from the Australian Arts Council, and will be in New York City through the end of the year in an association with the Horticultural Society of New York. Seeing the American national election process through his eyes was an interesting experience! We are gratified that he so enjoyed his time at The Huntington that he expressed a heartfelt wish to return soon.

A few of the participants in class with John. L to R: Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

A few of the participants in John’s class. (L to R:) Teri Kuwahara, Gilly Shaeffer, Jude Wiesenfeld, John Pastoriza-Piñol, Gayle Uyehara, Sydney Tanner, Cynthia Jackson, Leslie Walker, and Kat Powell. Photo by Melanie Campbell-Carter, © 2016.

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