You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘California native plants’ tag.

by Janice Sharp, posted by Deb Shaw

The California Native Plant Society (CNPS) will be holding its

2018 Conservation Conference
February 1 – 3, 2018
at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, California

The CNPS 2018 Conservation Conference features botanic art and photo contests and exhibits to highlight the beauty of California. The botanical art exhibition will be on display throughout the conference.

Artists are invited to enter original artwork in any two-dimensional medium that reflects the beauty and uniqueness of California flora and adheres to high standards of botanical accuracy. All entries must depict plants native to California (no introduced plants).

All the information (guidelines and entry form) are posted online for the botanic art contest and show. Both the entry guidelines and form are downloadable PDFs from this linked page.

Also included on the site are images of the winners of the 2015 botanical art and photography contests, including BAGSC members Joan Keesey who won first place for her watercolor of Salvia spathacea, Hummingbird Sage; and Lesley Randall, who won third place for her pen and ink scientific illustration of Malva assurgentiflora, Island Mallow.

The due date for entries is October 20, 2017.

Advertisements

by Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

BAGSC member Estelle DeRidder continues to work on her murals at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. And as promised, we’re bringing you updates.

Estelle DeRidder adding details to the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Estelle DeRidder adding details to the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Estelle is adding more plants and details to the murals, bringing the outdoors garden inside.

 

You can visit Estelle and the mural at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. The Madrona Marsh is located at 3201 Plaza del Amo, Torrance, CA 90503, 310-782-3989.

The Madrona Marsh is open free to the public, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, excluding holidays. Because most of the Marsh is staffed by volunteers, and because weather can be a factor, the times the Marsh and Nature Center is open is subject to change. Please call (310) 782-3989 before visiting to make sure the Marsh is open. 

If you missed the first post about Estelle’s mural, you can read it here on our BAGSC News blog.

by Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

The background and basic plant shapes are blocked in. Notes and reference photos are taped on the beginnings of the mural.

The background and basic plant shapes are blocked in. Notes and reference photos are taped on the beginnings of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

BAGSC member Estelle DeRidder has been painting a mural at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. She has been working on the wall for the past couple of weeks, but has done a great deal of planning previously.

I have been following the progress of the mural. The first time I saw it, the background was in and Estelle was beginning to paint in the big plants, but I couldn’t take any pictures as I had forgotten my iPad.

This past weekend, there were many more plants blocked in, and places were earmarked where more plants would go.

I will be keeping everyone up-to-date about Estelle’s botanical mural as the work progresses. More plants will continue to be blocked in, after which details will be added, including insects, animals and birds.

You can visit Estelle and the mural at the Madrona Marsh Preserve and Nature Center in Torrance, California. The Madrona Marsh is located at 3201 Plaza del Amo, Torrance, CA 90503, 310-782-3989.

Another section of the mural, with reference photos. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Another section of the mural, with reference photos. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

The Madrona Marsh is open free to the public, Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, excluding holidays. Because most of the Marsh is staffed by volunteers, and because weather can be a factor, the times the Marsh and Nature Center is open is subject to change. Please call (310) 782-3989 before visiting to make sure the Marsh is open. 

Another section of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

Another section of the mural. Photo by Leslie Walker, © 2017.

posted by Deb Shaw

http://www.bagsc.org/index.php/exhibitions

Descanso Gardens had perfect specimens of California native plants on the demonstration tables, with the botanical and common names on tags.

The most recent of BAGSC’s ongoing exhibitions at the Descanso Gardens opened on Friday May 19, 20017. The theme of the show is California Natives.

On the May 20 and 21 weekend, BAGSC held botanical art demonstrations in the Boddy House in conjunction with the exhibition opening and the Rose Festival at Descanso. Thank you Estelle DeRidder, Mitsuko Schultz and Janice Sharp for demonstrating botanical art and talking with the public.

Upon arrival at the Body House the demonstration artists were presented with fresh-cut California native flowers in vases on our cloth-covered tables. Each flower had a tag printed with its common name as well as its botanical name. Each was a perfect example of the species.

The continuous stream of visitors to the Boddy House were very enthusiastic about the art and the Native Plants on the table.

Docents at the Boddy House were very excited and complementary about our art and enjoyed seeing the change over of art. (They keep tabs on the exhibitions.)

The BAGSC sign at the beginning of the exhibition gives information about our organization and mission.

The BAGSC sign at the beginning of the exhibition gives information about our organization and mission.

The Boddy House at Descanso Gardens is open daily (except Mondays) from 10 am to 4 pm (the gardens are open daily 9-5).

The California Native Plants show runs until May 2018. The next BAGSC Descanso Garden show theme will be Plants from a Japanese Garden and will run from March, 2018 to March, 2019. Entries are due no later than February 12, 2018. Visit the BAGSC Exhibitions page for more details.

Happy painting.

Hanging along wall in the Boddy House at Descanso Gardens.

Hanging along wall in the Boddy House at Descanso Gardens.

by Joan Keesey and Deb Shaw

Eschscholzia californica, California Poppies, watercolor, © Joan Keesey, 2016, all rights reserved.

Eschscholzia californica, California Poppies, watercolor, © Joan Keesey, 2016, all rights reserved.

Joan Keesey will be exhibiting her botanical watercolors at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants from Saturday, January 21, through Saturday, April 22, 2017.

The exhibition will focus on California native plants blooming in and around the Theodore Payne Foundation and in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Everyone is invited to the opening reception for the exhibition, on Saturday, January 21, 2017, from 1 – 3 pm.

The Theodore Payne Foundation is located at 10459 Tuxford Street, Sun Valley, California 91352, 818.768.1802. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. Theodore Payne is closed Sunday and Monday each week. On-leash dogs are welcome. There is no admission fee.

tpf_single%c2%ad_logoTheodore Payne will be hosting their annual native Winter Plant Sale Thursday – Saturday, January 26 – 28, from 8:30 am – 4:30 pm all three days. Everyone will receive discounts for all three days, plus receive expert advice from Theodore Payne staff and volunteers. Members receive 15 percent off plants, seed and Theodore Payne wear all day. Non-members receive 10 percent off plants, seed and Theodore Payne wear after 11:00 am. Not yet a member? Join at the door! Shop early for best selection.

Bring your own boxes and wagons, see the art exhibition and purchase native California plants.

by Estelle DeRidder and Deb Shaw

Invitation for Estelle DeRidder's Madrona Marsh Nature Center Exhibition, © 2016, Estelle DeRidder.

Invitation for Estelle DeRidder’s Madrona Marsh Nature Center Exhibition, © 2016, Estelle DeRidder.

In 2012, BAGSC member Estelle DeRidder was awarded an education grant from the American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA) to use in creating reusable plant identification cards featuring California native plant illustrations from the Madrona Marsh Preserve in Torrence, California.

Information about Estelle’s project was presented at the ASBA Annual Meeting and Conference in Denver, Colorado during the ASBA Grant Presentations, October 17, 2014.

Estelle is now exhibiting the complete project at the Madrona Marsh Nature Center. Titled The Flashcard Project: Flora of the Madrona Marsh III, the exhibition runs from December 6, 2016 through January 20, 2017. There will be an opening reception Sunday, December 18, 2016
1:00 – 4:00 pm.

The public is invited and welcome.

The Nature Center at the Madrona Marsh Preserve is located at: 3201 Plaza del Amo, Torrance, CA 90505. Phone: (310) 32-MARSH. The Madrona March is open Tuesday – Sunday, 10 am – 5 pm.

If you are interested in applying for an ASBA grant, please apply by August 1, 2017 (open to ASBA members only). Information and the application can be found on the ASBA’s Grant page on their website.

by Estelle DeRidder, posted by Deb Shaw

As part of the 9th California Island Symposium, the Island Art Exhibition now moves from the Ventura Beach Marriott to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.

The public is invited to the opening reception of the Island Art Exhibition at the Pritzlaff Conservation Center at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden on October 11 from 6 – 7:30 pm. Guests will be able to enjoy the art and views of the Channel Islands. Light appetizers and refreshments will be served. The event is free, but registration is required. The exhibition will be on display at the Garden from October 11 through November 6, 2016.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

First place went to an acrylic painting by Marcia Burtt that depicts Prisoners Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. Nicole Strasburg won second place with a gouache etching of Scorpion Valley on Santa Cruz Island. Third place winner Estelle DeRidder used colored pencil to illustrate a native Toyon. An honorable mention was awarded to Mitsuko Schultz for her watercolor of a California Sycamore.

Registration and information for the opening reception at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is available on their website.

About the Island Art Exhibition:
The Island Art Exhibition explores creative practices at the intersection of art and science as a component of the California Islands Symposium. The Islands Symposia have been held every five years since 1965, and present recent work in all disciplines of natural, environmental, and cultural science on the California Islands, which include all of the islets, rocks, and islands off the Pacific coast of California and Baja California, Mexico. This juried art exhibition encourages a greater understanding and appreciation of the unique California Islands. The display features original paintings, watercolors, and pen and ink drawings that reflect the beauty of the islands.

About the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden:
The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is a 78-acre nonprofit educational and scientific institution that conserves California’s native plants through gardens, research, education, and sustainable practices. The Garden was founded in 1926 and is one of the nation’s oldest botanical gardens focused exclusively on native plants.

by Janice Sharp

Poster for California Native Plant Society Plant Sale.

Poster for California Native Plant Society Plant Sale.

The San Gabriel Mountain chapter of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) is having its annual plant sale in time for fall planting:
Saturday, November 5, 9 am – 2pm
Eaton Canyon Nature Center

If you are interested in drawing and painting California native plants and growing them in your garden, the San Gabriel Mountain chapter of CNPS has a variety of plants and wildflower seeds that grow in the Los Angeles basin. The 1,900 plants available for sale include plants that attract birds and butterflies.

Download an 8-1/2 x 11 poster advertising the plant sale (shown at left): cnps-plant-sale.
Download a preview of the plant list: cnpssgm_preview_160710.

The plant sale is located at the Eaton Canyon Nature Center, at 1750 North Altadena Drive, Pasadena 91107-1046.

by Estelle De Ridder, posted by Deb Shaw

The California Islands Symposia have been held more or less, every five years since 1965, to share up-to-date information about the management, scientific research, work in all disciplines of natural and cultural science and general well-being of the California islands.

The 9th California Island Symposium for 2016 is being held at the Marriott Hotel, Ventura, California. One of the less scientific and more entertaining presentations of this symposium will be the Art Exhibit that has been advertised for more than six months. The three jurors worked hard and with diligence to put together a coherent show that will present the Channel Islands to the public in an inviting and interesting manner. After the symposium, the exhibit will be moved to the Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens, where it will be on display for another three weeks.

The Channel Islands of California comprise eight islands located in the Pacific Ocean off the Southern California coast. Five of the islands and the surrounding waters are part of Channel Islands National Park and the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.

The Park is supported by many partners who share the protection of the history and prehistory, the cultural and biological diversity as well as protecting vital habitat for marine, terrestrial plant and animal species.

Public appreciation through education, interpretation and research is widely promoted.

Isolation over many thousands of years has developed unique animals, plants and archeological resources found ONLY on these islands and makes is possible for visitors to experience the western coast of the North America as it used to be.

Visitation has increased dramatically over the years, and with contracted concessionaires, the numbers show how the interest in the islands have grown:
1963   = 1,200
2014   =   342,000

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow. © 2016, Estelle De Ridder. Malva Rosa is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family. It is endemic to California, where it is native only to the Channel Islands. It can also be found growing as an escapee from cultivation in coastal mainland California. This illustration was done on drafting film and paper with watercolor and colored pencil.

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow. © 2016, Estelle De Ridder, all rights reserved. Watercolor and colored pencil on drafting film and paper.

Flora on the Channel Islands include a unique subspecies of pine, oak and island tree mallow.

Santa Rosa Island holds two groves of the endemic to the island, Torrey pine subspecies Pinus torreyana var. insularis. Torrey pines are the United States’ rarest pine species. The islands also house many rare and endangered species of plants, including the island barberry, the island rush rose, and the Santa Cruz Island lace pod. Giant kelp forests surround the islands and act as a source of nutrition and protection for other animals.

BAGSC members Estelle De Ridder, Mitsuko Schultz and Ellie Tu are participating in the exhibition.

Estelle has illustrated two species: Malva assurgentiflora and Heteromeles abtutifolia.

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow, Malva Rosa is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family. It grows into a strikingly architectural shrub/small tree with beautiful white bark.

It is endemic to California, where it is native only to the Channel Islands. It can also be found growing as an escapee from cultivation in coastal mainland California.

Estelle’s painting of Heteromeles abtutifolia was done on paper with watercolor and colored pencil. Heteromeles abtutifolia, Toyon berry, grows on the north-facing coastal bluffs of Santa Cruz Island. It grows on all the other islands, except Santa Barbara island, and was planted on San Nicolas.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Mitsuko Schultz had her Platanus racemosa, California Sycamore accepted to the exhibition.

Ellie Tu has three pieces in the exhibition: Dudleya greenei, Coreopsis, and Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis is a strikingly strange plant. It grows on dunes, rocky cliffs and exposed slopes, and has a fleshy trunk and branches. It can reach heights of eight feet with a five inch trunk. It is deciduous and dormant in the dry season, taking on an other worldly appearance when visitors hike through a large stand of them. In spring, however, masses of bright yellow blooms put on quite a show.

Ceanothus arboreus, Feltleaf Ceanothus, or Island Ceanothus. Watercolor, © 2016, Ellie Tu, all rights reserved.

Ceanothus arboreus, Feltleaf Ceanothus, or Island Ceanothus. Watercolor, © 2016, Ellie Tu, all rights reserved.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg, (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis, Ellie Tu, colored pencil, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg, (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis, Ellie Tu, colored pencil, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

by Susan Jackson, posted by Deb Shaw

A new exhibit has just opened at the San Diego Natural History Museum in Balboa Park that botanical artists would find quite interesting. It is located in the Eleanor and Jerome Navarra Special Collections Gallery on the third floor of the museum. It is a permanent exhibition called Extraordinary Ideas from Ordinary People: A History of Citizen Science which features rare books, art, photographs, maps and historical documents that pay homage to the past, present, and future of citizen science.

The upper mezzanine features an exhibit that a botanical artist will not want to miss. On display are nine “Plant Portraits” by the early twentieth century painter, A. R. Valentien. He was commissioned by the philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps to paint California wildflowers. Over a period of ten years, Valentien traveled around California creating exquisite watercolor and gouache scientific illustrations. Part of the collection of 1,094 paintings, all done on 13x 20 paper, will be rotated in this gallery. A book which includes photographs of all the paintings can be found in the gift shop, however, it is no substitute for seeing the real thing. Bring your magnifying glass.

The gallery also has original catalogs from Pierre-Joseph Redoute, William Curtis, Auguste Johann Rosel von Rosenhoff, and John James Audubon. These are huge volumes printed in black ink and then hand colored. They are a reminder of a time before photography when beautiful books were only available to the very wealthy. Although we frequently see prints that originated from these catalogs, there is something very special in actually seeing the originals.

More information about the exhibit and the San Diego Natural History Museum may be found on their website. There is also a short video about the Valentien Collection, which can be seen by clicking on the arrow located on the close up view of the Mariposa Lily. If you decide to visit, plan on spending several hours, because there are lots of other things to see as well.

The San Diego Museum of Natural History is located at 1788 El Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101. The Museum is open daily 10 AM to 5 PM, and until 8 PM on most Fridays this summer. Visit the website for ticket prices and specific daily hours; the Museum may close early on some days.

by Deb Shaw

One of 512 Unique Blueprints created by the artist and team to distribute at the Field Office.

One of 512 Unique Blueprints created by the artist and team to distribute at the Field Office.

Artist Mel Chin has a new Land Art project in Los Angeles, entitled The Tie that Binds. Created for Los Angeles’ CURRENT:LA Water Public Art Biennial, the project invites visitors to connect to the site of the Bowtie Project, to understand water conservation in Southern California and to join hundreds of other LA residents in owning a work of Land Art we can grow in our own yards.

The Bowtie Project envisions a transformation of a stretch of the LA River. Once a railroad yard, this rare, 18-acre part of the River was left completely in its natural state, never transformed by engineers or concrete. Currently overgrown with invasive species, the site is still home to some native plant species, fish and birds.

TTB plot 111-CF, Bowtie demonstration garden and South LA mirror installation.

TTB plot 111-CF, Bowtie demonstration garden and South LA mirror installation.

The Bowtie Project is part of a plan to restore this area of the LA River as an natural, urban state park. The Tie that Binds imagines the future Bowtie Project and the entire city sustained with water-saving, California-native landscapes. Compelled by the beauty of the site and belief that this is a place that should be owned by everyone, The Tie that Binds invites the public to “mirror” this future landscape in hundreds of individual lawns throughout Southern California.

To introduce the project, eight, small Land Art gardens are planted at the Bowtie site to serve as “models”. A field office on site is staffed by “MirrorMakers/Espejeros” and is open Thursday–Sunday evenings through August 14. Private and public locations in diverse neighborhoods of Southern California have already planted exact replicas or “mirrors” of one of the Bowtie Project garden demonstrations.

demonstration garden and Brentwood mirror installation.

TTB plot 184-DJ, Bowtie demonstration garden and Brentwood mirror installation.

Mel Chin invites Southern California to help realize this Land Art work. Those who commit to growing a The Tie that Binds mirror garden receive a free, unique, artist-designed blueprint, a list of native plant species, and instructions on how to grow a garden that requires little or no watering. These gardens will fulfill the potential of a living sculpture that is collectively owned by the public.

Carolina Miranda wrote a wonderful article for the LA Times about the site, titled “Why Mel Chin is giving away the land art design of his subversively charming CURRENT:LA native garden.” You can see additional photos of the installation, as well as photos of the installation with Miranda’s trusty research assistant, Bonnie, the American Staffordshire Terrier.

MirrorMakers Yrneh and Margo with Roger, a new Tie that Binds blueprint holder (Photo credit: Amanda Wiles, © 2016).

MirrorMakers Yrneh and Margo with Roger, a new Tie that Binds blueprint holder (Photo credit: Amanda Wiles, © 2016).

Visiting The Tie that Binds
The Bowtie Project is an 18-acre post-industrial site owned by California State Parks and is located at 2780 Casitas Ave, Los Angeles, CA, 90039. Please enter through the yellow gate and follow directions for parking. The nearly 3/4 mile site is accessed by walking; accommodations will be made for any who need assistance.

The Tie that Binds field office at the Bowtie Project is open 5:30 pm until sunset, Thursday – Sunday through August 14, 2016. Mirror Makers/Espejeros are onsite to talk with visitors about the project.

About the Artist
Mel Chin is from Houston, Texas and is known for the broad range of approaches in his art, including works that require multi-disciplinary, collaborative teamwork and works that conjoin cross-cultural aesthetics with complex ideas. He developed Revival Field (1989-ongoing), a project that pioneered the field of “green remediation,” the use of plants to remove toxic, heavy metals from the soil. A current project, Fundred Dollar Bill/Operation Paydirt, focuses on national awareness and prevention of childhood lead-poisoning through art-making. Mel is also well known for his iconic sculptures and installations, works that often address the importance of memory and collective identity, and for inserting art into unlikely places, including destroyed homes, toxic landfills, and even popular television, investigating how art can provoke greater social awareness and responsibility.

Mirror Garden Host Blueprint Holders from Long Beach (photo Amanda Wiles)

Mirror Garden Host Blueprint Holders from Long Beach (Photo credit: Amanda Wiles, © 2016.)

The Tie that Binds: The Mirror of the Future is produced by Mel Chin in partnership with California State Parks, The Bowtie Project, and Clockshop. It is is commissioned by Department of Cultural Affairs for Current: LA Water Public Art Biennial 2016, and is made possible by the support of the Department of Cultural Affairs, The City of Los Angeles, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation.

 

California Poppy, 50"x28", © JW Fike, 2015. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

California Poppy, 50″x28″, © JW Fike, 2015. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

by Deb Shaw

There are a wealth of exhibitions this summer in Southern California that are botanically instructive and inspirational.

One is in South Orange County. Soka University in Aliso Viejo is currently showing JW (Jimmy) Fike’s solo exhibition, Photographic Survey of the Wild Edible Botanicals of California, now through August 26, 2016.

Even though his medium is photography, rather than traditional painting or drawing, the intent behind Fike’s large, stark, beautiful photographs is similar to any botanical artist or illustrator:

“Within my system the plant is excavated, arranged in the studio, photographed, then illustrated digitally in such a way as to render the edible parts in color while the remaining parts, less emphatically, read as contact prints.” [Quote from Soka University website.]

Henbit, 28"x20", © JW Fike, 2014. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

Henbit, 28″x20″, © JW Fike, 2014. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

After Fike meticulously composes and arranges his specimen to emphasize key plant characteristics, he photographs it and then begins illustrating in Photoshop. Each piece may take up to three or four months to illustrate. (Sound familiar?) Each photograph references scientific illustration, contact prints, and photograms:

“I’m referencing the history of contact prints and photograms from the dawn of photography,” said Fike, noting 19th century English botanist Anna Atkins and pioneering photographer Henry Fox Talbot. “Some of the very first photographs were plant specimens on sensitized paper.” [Quote from LA Times article, Haunting flowers: The eerily beautiful California botanical art of J.W. Fike.]

Fike exhibits a symbiotic collection of edible plants from a geographic area. He has photographed more than ninety plants in “seven different states and plan to continue the survey until I’ve created a collection that spans the continental United States.” [Quote from Soka University website.]

Soap plant, 110" x 64", © JW Fike, 2015. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

Soap plant, 110″ x 64″, © JW Fike, 2015. Photographed in Miramonte, CA.

Fike’s exhibition has been covered in the LA Times, and on Botanical Art & Artists by Katherine Tyrrell. His photographs and other articles can be found on his blog.

Soka University’s Founders Hall Art Gallery is located at 1 University Drive, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656, 949-480-4000, info@soka.edu
Exhibition now through August 26, 2016
Free Admission
Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Map and directions

by Deb Shaw

Estelle DeRidder, Helianthus annuus (annual sunflower) with Spinus tristis (American goldfinch), © 2015, all rights reserved.

Estelle DeRidder, Helianthus annuus (annual sunflower) with Spinus tristis (American goldfinch), © 2015, all rights reserved.

BAGSC member Estelle DeRidder currently has an exhibition at the Theodore Payne Gallery in Sun Valley, California. Entitled “California Native Plants and their Pollinators,” the exhibition runs from May 7 through August 20, 2016.

Estelle works with a combination of media, including watercolor, colored pencil and acrylics. Her Theodore Payne Foundation exhibition depicts various California native plants, along with their appropriate pollinators including hummingbirds, gray hairstreak butterflies and bees.

Estelle also is offering drawing demonstrations the second Saturday of each month the exhibition is open: June 11, July 9, and August 13, from 10 am – noon. The demonstrations are free; no reservations are required. Participants can meet in the Theodore Payne Gallery with hat and water bottle. By popular demand, Estelle has been illustrating and sketching on the grounds of the Theodore Payne Foundation.

The Theodore Payne Foundation is located at: 10459 Tuxford Street, Sun Valley, California 91352, 818-768-1802 and is open to the public during business hours, Tuesday – Saturday, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. The grounds, nursery and gallery are closed Sunday – Monday . The Gallery on-site offers three exhibitions each year, featuring contemporary, modern and historic artists whose work is influenced by our state flora, landscape and natural history.

by Deb Shaw

BAGSC News previously posted Gilly Shaeffer’s acceptance into “Celebrating Flora of the National Parks“, the new exhibition by the United States Botanic Garden (USBG) and the National Park Service (NPS) showcasing plants and ecological communities found throughout the more than 400 national parks.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

BAGSC member Ellie Tu also was accepted into “Celebrating Flora”. Ellie’s cousin visited the exhibition at the US Botanic Garden at the end of March, and sent these photos of his visit.

The exhibition, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NPS and the diversity of our national park’s flora, will run from February 18 – October 2, 2016 in the USBG Conservatory in Washington, D.C. Artworks in a wide variety of media by 78 artists from across the country are on display, along with living specimens from the USBG and graphics representing each of the National Parks represented. Programs will include botanical illustration and photography workshops, meet-the-artist sessions, and lectures by national parks rangers and other experts.

The U.S. Botanic Garden is the oldest public garden in the United States, and is open to the public, free of charge, every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Conservatory is located at 100 Maryland Ave. SW, on the southwest side of the U.S. Capitol. More information about the exhibit, programs, and visiting the USBG is available on the website.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Congratulations to Ellie and Gilly, and Happy 100th birthday to the US Botanic Garden!

Entry to "Flora of the National Parks". Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Entry to “Flora of the National Parks”. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

by Ellie Tu and Deb Shaw

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved.

BAGSC member Ellie Tu will have two displays of her botanical art, and will present two talks this coming weekend:

Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 1 pm
Ojai Library, Ojai, California

Ellie will present a talk entitled “Channel Islands National Park Guide Book Illustrations and a Glance at Traditional Botanical Art.” This talk will include a brief history of traditional botanical art and explain the equipment and materials used for painting and drawing.

Ellie will also speak on the process of creating the Channel Islands National Park guide book illustrations and give a drawing demonstration. She will bring some plant samples for guests to experience from a botanical illustrator’s point of view.

Ellie Tu illustrated the Channel Islands National Park guide books.

Ellie Tu illustrated the Channel Islands National Park guide books.

Ellie Tu illustrated the Channel Islands National Park guide books.

Ellie Tu illustrated the Channel Islands National Park guide books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellie’s artwork will be on display in the library until the end of June, 2016.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the library at (805) 646-1639. The E.P Foster Library is located at: 111 East Ojai Avenue, Ojai, California 93023.

Pen and ink illustrations of California native plants by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Pen and ink illustrations of California native plants by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Sunday, March 20, 2016 at 2 pm
Oak Park Library, Oak Park, California

On Sunday, March 20, Ellie will present a talk entitled “Botanical Wonders: An introduction to Traditional Botanical Art.” Ellie will give a brief history of botanical art, show the step-by-step process of botanical painting, and give a watercolor demonstration. Those who attend get to create (and take home) their own botanical art! Ellie’s artwork will be on display in the library until April 3, 2016.

This event is free and open to the public. The address for the Oak Park Library is: 897 North Kanan Road, Oak Park, CA 91377.

 

Additionally, Ellie will be giving a talk at Channel Islands National Park auditorium on April 9th. Stay tuned — details will be posted to our BAGSC News blog.

Ellie demonstrated botanical art with BAGSC at the Bowers Museum and at Roger's Gardens.

Ellie demonstrated botanical art with BAGSC at the Bowers Museum and at Roger’s Gardens.

%d bloggers like this: