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by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Cork Oak Tree, watercolor on paper, Gilly Shaeffer, © 2017, all rights reserved.

Cork Oak Tree, watercolor on paper, Gilly Shaeffer, © 2017, all rights reserved.

I am participating in the Arroyo Arts Collective 25th Annual Discovery Tour on Sunday, November 19, 2017. This is a self-guided tour of artists homes and studios in Northeast Los Angeles. It is a one day event that goes from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. I will have my botanical paintings and prints on display and my long time friend, Bob Layport, landscape oil painter, will be showing his paintings at my home. We would love to have you stop by to see our display. Hope you will come.

To find out more about this free art tour, please go to ArroyoArtsCollective.org or if you would just like to come to see the display at my home, just email me.

About the Arroyo Arts Collective Annual Discovery Tour

The Arroyo Arts Collective is a grassroots, community-based organization of artists, poets, musicians, performers, craftspersons and supporters of the creative community in Northeast Los Angeles. After twenty five years, the ground breaking Arroyo Arts Collective Annual Discovery Tour is going out with a bang. Our last Tour will be Sunday, November 19, 2017 from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and admission is free.

The Arroyo Arts Collective (AAC) invites the entire Northeast Los Angeles (NELA) community to visit the homes and studios of the artists who make up the 2017 Discovery Tour!

More information can be found on the Arroyo Arts Collective website.

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by Clara Josephs and Deb Shaw

BAGSC’s next quarterly meeting will be on April 2, 2017. Information has been posted on BAGSC’s website in the “Member’s Only” section.

Come hear about our scheduled workshops and exhibitions for the year, as well as our celebration of the 20th Anniversary of our founding and the ASBA conference in Northern California. Additionally, Janice Sharp will teach a mini-workshop about metal point. Come learn and practice your technique.

If you would like to participate in the mini metal point workshop, RSVPs must be emailed before March 19 so supplies can be ordered! Questions? Contact BAGSC Program Chair Clara Josephs. Problems logging into the BAGSC website? Contact Deb Shaw.

See you at the meeting!

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Save-the-date postcard, designed by Jan and Chas Clouse, featuring Gilly Shaeffer's watercolor of a California native walnut, © 2017.

Save-the-date postcard, designed by Jan and Chas Clouse, featuring Gilly Shaeffer’s watercolor of a California native walnut, © 2017.

The Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. Mark your calendars–on August 26, 2017, the Guild will be having a gala celebration in honor of our Anniversary.

Since its inception in 1997, our group has grown, changed and keeps getting better. So, we have good reason to celebrate. Members continue to develop their botanical art skills through classes and workshops, and, as a result of this dedication and hard work, we have more and more opportunities to show our art. Through outreach, exhibition and educational activities, BAGSC has increased southern Californian’s awareness and appreciation for this art form.

We have many activities planned in honor of our 20-year milestone.

The Los Angeles Arboretum Library, one of our earliest supporters, will be hosting a BAGSC exhibition, entitled “Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art”. The exhibition will feature trees that grow in Mediterranean climates. Opening in early July, 2017, the exhibition will run until the end of September.

On August 26 we will hold a 20th Anniversary Celebration at the Los Angeles Arboretum:

4:00 – Artists will lead a tour of the exhibition and discuss the art.

5:00 – A special presentation will be given by Matt Ritter, author of A Californian’s Guide to Trees Among Us. Matt is a professor at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, a tree expert and a photographer. This promises to be a delightful and informative presentation.

6:00 – The Anniversary Dinner will be held at the Peacock Café Patio at sunset. Olga Eysymontt, long time botanical art instructor, will share memories of BAGSC beginnings and how botanical art got started in Los Angeles. And there will be opportunities for all to connect with old friends and meet new ones.

Invitations to this special event will be available soon. The suggested donation for attending is $60.

Keep your eyes open for invitations and more information. Entries for the exhibition at the LA Arboretum Library, “Illustrating the Urban Forest: 20 Years of Botanical Art” are due May 12, 2017. The “Call for Entries” can be found on the BAGSC website Exhibitions page and in the Members Only section. Questions on the exhibition? Please contact Janice Sharp. Questions about the 20th Anniversary Celebration? Please contact Gilly Shaeffer.

bagsc20thCMYKWe are looking forward to sharing a beautiful afternoon and evening with members, friends, family, special guests from the Los Angeles botanical gardens community and more. We hope all will join us for this magical anniversary celebration.

 

by Deb Shaw

BAGSC News previously posted Gilly Shaeffer’s acceptance into “Celebrating Flora of the National Parks“, the new exhibition by the United States Botanic Garden (USBG) and the National Park Service (NPS) showcasing plants and ecological communities found throughout the more than 400 national parks.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

BAGSC member Ellie Tu also was accepted into “Celebrating Flora”. Ellie’s cousin visited the exhibition at the US Botanic Garden at the end of March, and sent these photos of his visit.

The exhibition, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NPS and the diversity of our national park’s flora, will run from February 18 – October 2, 2016 in the USBG Conservatory in Washington, D.C. Artworks in a wide variety of media by 78 artists from across the country are on display, along with living specimens from the USBG and graphics representing each of the National Parks represented. Programs will include botanical illustration and photography workshops, meet-the-artist sessions, and lectures by national parks rangers and other experts.

The U.S. Botanic Garden is the oldest public garden in the United States, and is open to the public, free of charge, every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Conservatory is located at 100 Maryland Ave. SW, on the southwest side of the U.S. Capitol. More information about the exhibit, programs, and visiting the USBG is available on the website.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Congratulations to Ellie and Gilly, and Happy 100th birthday to the US Botanic Garden!

Entry to "Flora of the National Parks". Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Entry to “Flora of the National Parks”. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

California Poppy, watercolor by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2016, all rights reserved.

California Poppy, watercolor by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer recently had two paintings accepted for the exhibit at the United States Botanic Gardens, Washington, D.C.: her paintings of Toyon Berries and California Poppies. These plants can be found at the Channel Islands National Park in California.

Entitled “Celebrating Flora of the U.S. National Parks,” this exhibition is in collaboration with the National Park Service, celebrating their 100th anniversary, and will showcase the diversity of the plant life throughout the U.S. National Parks.

The exhibit will be open from February through October, 2016.

Congratulations Gilly! A great way to start the New Year!

Toyon Berries, watercolor by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Toyon Berries, watercolor by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2016, all rights reserved.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Gilly Shaeffer, "Camellia," watercolor on paper, 2015, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer, “Camellia,” watercolor on paper, 2015, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer, long time member of BAGSC, will be holding four Wednesday morning classes in January, 2016 at her home studio in “Botanical Drawing and Watercolor Basics.” This is a great opportunity for beginners and intermediates to perfect their drawing skills and also a preparation for doing botanical watercolor painting. It is perfect for those who like a small group experience with a lot of individualized attention. It will consist of a cumulative series of exercises to improve observational and drawing skills, as well as, preparing students to create three dimensional form through light to dark shading. Those who complete the drawing exercises with Gilly will move on to the study of botanical watercolor painting. The understanding and skills gained through these classes can be applied when doing all types of drawing and painting.

Visit Gilly Shaeffer’s website to see samples of her work and read her “Bio” to learn about her educational background, teaching experiences and accomplishments in botanical art.

Four Wednesdays in January, 2016: January 6, 13, 20, 27
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Fee:$160
Locations: Gilly’s Home Studio

For address, directions, and answers to any questions, please Gilly’s email address.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Heteromeles arbutifolia, Toyon by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Heteromeles arbutifolia, Toyon by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015, all rights reserved.

BAGSC members are invited to this Art Show and Sale at Gilly Shaeffer’s home, studio and garden this Sunday, November 22nd.

It will go from 9:30 to 5:00 p.m. Gilly’s show is part of the Arroyo Arts Collective Tour which takes place around northeast Los Angeles area every year. Gilly will have many years of her botanical painting work on display. Robert Layport-landscape oil painter, Cecile Decigaran-jewelry designer, Carol Yin and Kylie Ruan- potters will also be showing their work at Gilly’s during this event.

If you would like to buy a ticket to attend other art sites on this tour, you can do so online at http://arroyoartscollective.org. You do not need a ticket to come to Gilly’s—all BAGSC members are welcome!

The show is located at Gilly’s: 825 Elyria Dr., Los Angeles, California 90065

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Asuka Hishiki demonstrating during the "Weird, Wild & Wonderful" Symposium at The Huntington, July 2015. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki demonstrating during the “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” Symposium at The Huntington, July 2015. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

During the recent “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” Symposium at The Huntington, I watched Asuka Hishiki as she demonstrated how she would paint a segment of an heirloom tomato skin. Here are my impressions of the way she went about developing this small sample of the tomato skin with paint.

  • Asuka says every time she approaches her subject it is new for her.
  • Asuka starts sketches on tracing paper.
  • She uses a wood pencil in a pencil holder which she sharpens with a box cutter.
  • She goes over her pencil lines with a lighter color paint or yellow ochre.  So she will have thin lines in watercolor for her drawing.
  • At this point she erases any pencil lines.
  • She covers the entire form with a Chinese white wash. (The Chinese white that she likes is the Holbein brand.)  She says one should stay very light when applying the first layer of this white paint. This Chinese white wash acts as a protection for the paper. Much of it gets taken off during the removal of the masking fluid (to be mentioned later).
  • Asuka will add more Chinese white paint on the places where she wants the paint to bleed to create  soft color transitions. She also mentions the importance of keeping  harmony in the colors used as the form develops.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • She mixes three colors together in a small amount to be used to develop the form using the dry brush technique. She uses Interlon brand brush #3/0 for her dry brush work.
  • In preparing to use masking fluid to prevent certain areas of the paper from getting painted, she would prime the brush to be used with liquid soap. The soap helps to keep the masking fluid brush in good shape for future use. This brush is used exclusively for masking fluid.
  • She will use the masking fluid to hold the places that she does not want to get painted—in this case the place where a leaf would be (which looks like a skinny wiggly line in the photos), where the highlights would be and where imperfections would be found on the tomato skin.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • Asuka stipples on the masking fluid with a very skinny brush on the section that she has begun to paint.
  • She uses tissue to blot any extra paint from her paper.
  • Then she adds a second layer of  masking fluid. So, this layer of masking fluid dots will have more tone than the first layer of dots that she applied that prevent any paint from getting through to the paper.
  • She always makes sure that the paint and the masking fluid that she has applied are absolutely dry before proceeding.
  • She says that you can lift paint more easily when you have first applied a Chinese white wash to the paper.
  • She applies a layer of Yellow Ochre wash.
  • She continues to develop the form through her dry brush technique. At this point the masking fluid remains on the painted area.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • Asuka uses Winsor Newton Series 7 brushes, #5 and #3 for the colored washes.
  • She adds a third layer of masking fluid dots.
  • With WN Series 7 #5 brush, she puts a colored wash on the section that she had previously dry brushed. This makes any lines from dry brushing disappear.
  • Now she lifts the masking fluid dots. When she does this she is also lifting the Chinese white paint that was applied to the paper at the very start.  The white of the paper now shows through in the places that had masking fluid on them.
  • She decides that she wants to apply another layer (this would be the fourth layer) of masking fluid dots. This will make the dots appear lighter and less visible than the layers applied earlier.
  • Next more dry brushing with a deeper color paint. Some stippling is used. Then some more wet strokes (colored washes) to further the development of the form.
  • When she removes the fourth layer of masking fluid, it is easy to see the section of the heirloom tomato skin developing on the paper with its highlights, its shiny smooth skin, its roundness, its imperfections and its rich colors of orange, red, and purple.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Gilly Shaeffer, "Camellia," watercolor on paper, 2015, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer, “Camellia,” watercolor on paper, 2015, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer, long time member of BAGSC, will be holding four Thursday morning classes in July at her home studio entitled “Drawing Basics.” This is a great opportunity for beginners and intermediates to perfect their drawing skills and also a preparation for doing botanical watercolor painting. It is perfect for those who like a small group experience with a lot of individualized attention. It will consist of a cumulative series of exercises to improve observational and drawing skills, as well as, preparing students to create three dimensional form through light to dark shading. Those who complete the drawing exercises with Gilly will move on to the study of botanical watercolor painting. The understanding and skills gained through these classes can be applied when doing all types of drawing and painting.

Visit Gilly Shaeffer’s website to see samples of her work and read her “Bio” to learn about her educational background, teaching experiences and accomplishments in botanical art.

Four Thursdays in July: July 2; July 9; July 16; July 23
Fee:$160
Locations: Gilly’s Home Studio

For address, directions, and answers to any questions, please Gilly’s email address.

by Janice Sharp and Beth Stone

Gilly Shaeffer demonstrating her watercolor technique. Gilly Shaeffer demonstrating her watercolor technique. Photo credit: Brad King (SCCS President).

Gilly Shaeffer demonstrating her watercolor technique. Gilly Shaeffer demonstrating her watercolor technique. Photo credit: Brad King (SCCS President).

In January of 2015 BAGSC staged a show entitled A Passion for Camellias in Van de Kamp Hall at Descanso Gardens. The exhibit was an exciting addition to the first Camellia flower show of the 2015 show season. BAGSC members were on hand all that weekend to answer questions and to provide demonstrations.

At the request of Descanso Gardens, 11 art works from the initial display of 20 have been re-hung in the historic and beautifully restored Boddy House where they are expected to remain well into 2016. Art works were selected to represent as many contributing artists as possible. The area where the botanicals are hanging invites close observation, along the interior hallway leading to and spilling into the kitchen.

You’ll want to set aside some time to bring friends and family to visit Descanso Gardens and see this lovely display in person. For an orientation to the Boddy House, please refer to the Descanso Gardens web site: https://www.descansogardens.org/explore/boddy-house

Artist Tania Norris chatting with Camellia enthusiast Hiromi Sato.

Artist Tania Norris chatting with Camellia enthusiast Hiromi Sato.

While you’re there, be sure to stop into the Sturt Haaga Gallery to see California Light opening May 3rd:
https://www.descansogardens.org/explore/upcoming-exhibition/

Many thanks to David Brown, Susan Armstrong and Cris Martinez of Descanso Gardens for welcoming BAGSC’s Passion for Camellias to the Boddy House.

Watercolor of C. japonica ‘Berenice Boddy’ by Clara Josephs, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Watercolor of C. japonica ‘Berenice Boddy’ by Clara Josephs, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Camellia Botanicals in Descanso’s Boddy House.

Camellia Botanicals in Descanso’s Boddy House.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Persimmons, watercolor on paper, Gilly Shaeffer, © 2014, all rights reserved.

Persimmons, watercolor on paper, Gilly Shaeffer, © 2014, all rights reserved.

Gilly Shaeffer has invited us to an Art Show and Sale during the 22nd Annual Arroyo Arts Collective Tour at the Shaeffer’s Home and Garden, 825 Elyria Drive, Los Angeles, 90065.

The show will be held during the tour:
Saturday, November 22, 2014
9:30 am – 5:00 pm

The show at the Shaeffer’s will feature the works of three artists:

  • Robert Layport: Oil Paintings of the American West
  • Carol Yin: Handmade Functional Pottery
  • Gilly Shaeffer: Botanical Watercolor Paintings, Tiles & Prints

There is special pricing during the Annual Arroyo Arts Collective Tour on Saturday only.

by Deb Shaw

Pinus ponderosa, Ponderosa Pine by Carrie DiConstanzo. Winner of the 2013 Roth Award for distinction with an emphasis on traditional botanical art presentation. © 2014, all rights reserved.

Pinus ponderosa, Ponderosa Pine by Carrie DiConstanzo. Winner of the 2013 Roth Award for distinction with an emphasis on traditional botanical art presentation. © 2014, all rights reserved.

BAGSC members Nina Antze, Joan Keesey, Patricia Mark, Mitsuko Schultz, Gilly Shaeffer, and Deborah Shaw have been accepted into the 16th Annual Botanical Art Exhibition at Folili in Woodside, California. There were 167 entries submitted this year from 68 artists and the jurors selected 65 for this exhibition.

The Exhibit will be on display from Tuesday, April 8 through Sunday, June 8, 2014. In addition to the 65 contemporary works displayed in the Visitor and Education Center, select pieces from Filoli’s three major florilegia collections, the Filoli, the Banks’ and the Highgrove will be on display in the historic House during the same period.

The Artists’ Reception is scheduled for Thursday, April 10 from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Artists will be on hand to share their expertise and experiences. Prints, matted originals and note cards will be for sale. An after-hours Garden visit will be available that evening as well. The reception is free, but reservations are required by Friday, April 4. Register online or by calling Member Services at 650-364-8300 x 508.

Additionally, a lecture titled Plant Portraits: The California Legacy of A.R. Valentein will be presented Thursday, April 10, 2014, 3:00 pm–4:30 pm by Margaret Dykens, Director of Research at the San Diego Natural History Museum. A nominal fee of $25.00 for Filoli members; $30.00 for non-members will be charged. A book sale of the 212-page catalog by the same name and book signing will follow the presentation.

Register online for the lecture, or for both the lecture and the reception, or by calling Member Services at 650-364-8300 x 508.

Congratulations to all! From the list of participating artists and works, it promises to be a wonderful exhibition.

by Deb Shaw

(left to right) Leslie Walker, Joan Keesey and Lesley Randall hang and straighten artwork.

(left to right) Leslie Walker, Joan Keesey and Lesley Randall hang and straighten artwork, photo by John Keesey.

Botanical Visions, an exhibition of botanical art by the Botanical Artist Guild of Southern California opened on January 12th in the Ecke Building of the San Diego Botanic Garden.

The exhibit features paintings, drawings and prints in watercolor, pen and ink, graphite and colored pencil. BAGSC member Lesley Randall organized this wonderful exhibition of ten BAGSC artists: Estelle DeRidder, Linda Ericksen, Polly Jones, Joan Keesey, Lesley Randall, Gilly Shaeffer, Janice Sharp, Deborah Shaw, Mitsuko Schultz and Patricia Van Osterhoudt.

(left to right) Janice Sharp and Mitsuko Schultz hanging artwork.

(left to right) Janice Sharp and Mitsuko Schultz hanging artwork, photo by John Keesey.

(left to right) Mitsuko Schultz and Patty Van Osterhoudt.

(left to right) Mitsuko Schultz and Patty Van Osterhoudt, photo by Deborah Shaw.

The artwork was hung the day of the opening artists’ reception in the Ecke Building. The light-filled, open-beamed room is used as a classroom, so the artwork will have lots of exposure for the duration of the show, from January 13 – March 23, 2013.

(left to right) Joan Keesey and Janice Sharp share a laugh before the Artists' Reception.

(left to right) Joan Keesey and Janice Sharp share a laugh before the Artists’ Reception, photo by Deborah Shaw.

Lesley Randall, Leslie Walker, Estelle DeRidder, Joan Keesey (and BAGSC helper John), Polly Jones (and husband), Patty Van Osterhoudt (and BAGSC helper Chris), Janice Sharp, Mitsuko Schultz and I were all on hand to hang the show. Linda Ericksen joined us for the reception.

(right to left) Polly Jones, Polly's husband and Estelle DeRidder place artwork labels.

(right to left) Polly Jones, Polly’s husband and Estelle DeRidder place artwork labels, photo by Deborah Shaw.

Formerly called “Quail Gardens”, the San Diego Botanic Gardens are absolutely beautiful, and this is a wonderful time of year to see them. Although the gardens are extensive, with different sections devoted to plants from different parts of the world, each section feels like an intimate treasure, with delightful surprises around each bend of the path.

A few attendees at the Artists' Reception, photo by John Keesey.

A few attendees at the Artists’ Reception, photo by John Keesey.

A statue in the garden, San Diego Botanic Gardens, photo by John Keesey.

A statue in the garden, San Diego Botanic Gardens, photo by John Keesey.

The exhibit will be open during regular garden hours January 13 – March 23, 2013.

Thank you Lesley!

by Joan Keesey; photography by John Keesey, posted by Deb Shaw

Joan Keesey in Fern Canyon at Descanso Gardens with Coast Live Oaks

Joan Keesey in Fern Canyon at Descanso Gardens with Coast Live Oaks

Yesterday John and I visited Descanso Gardens to check out the two art exhibitions currently on display there. In the Sturt Haaga Gallery the exhibit, “The WILD Flowers”, is a collection of works by seventeen contemporary California artists. Concurrently, contemporary botanical illustrations are being presented in the Boddy House; these paintings are provided by five members of the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC): Joan Keesey, Sue Kuuskmae, Gilly Shaeffer, Janice Sharp, and Deborah Shaw.

It was a beautiful clear and crisp day, and although it is still winter, Descanso Gardens was very lovely; the magnificent Coast Live Oaks (Quercus agrifolia) provide the perfect canopy for the garden’s remarkable collection of Camellias, many of which were blooming.

Penelope Gottlieb, "Flowers Gone WILD"

Penelope Gottlieb, “Flowers Gone WILD”

I hadn’t really expected to like the exhibit, “The WILD Flowers”. I couldn’t conceive of how an artist could invent flowers that were more wild and astonishing than real flowers, but the pictures were very imaginative, technically accomplished, and fun. Many of them, like Potentilia multijuja by Penelope Gottlieb, included recognizable flowers and plants. I was told that Ms. Gottlieb always includes a flower that is no longer in existence.

Gary Brewer, "Flowers Gone WILD"

Gary Brewer, “Flowers Gone WILD”

Maura Bendett, "Flowers Gone WILD"

Maura Bendett, “Flowers Gone WILD”

There was one video that had bubble-gum and aqua colored slime dripping from slowly opening lilies—not sure what that was all about.

Sue Kuuskmae in the Gunroom.

Sue Kuuskmae in the Gunroom.

The botanical paintings by BAGSC members were very thoughtfully displayed and illuminated in the Hall and the Gunroom of the Boddy House. Without knowing that I was involved the docent was very enthusiastic about and complementary of our

More Action in the Gunroom -- Gilly Shaeffer & Janice Sharp.

More Action in the Gunroom — Gilly Shaeffer & Janice Sharp.

pictures. Several visitors took pictures of our pictures. I am impressed and proud that BAGSC has been able to provide quality paintings for the three concurrently running botanical exhibitions in Southern California: “Botanical Visions” at the San Diego Botanical Garden, “Drought Tolerant Beauty” at Chapman University, and “Contemporary Botanical Illustrations” at Descanso Gardens.

Sue Kuuskmae, Deborah Shaw & Joan Keesey in the Hallway.

Sue Kuuskmae, Deborah Shaw & Joan Keesey in the Hallway.

by Janice Sharp

JANUARY 15 – MARCH 31, 2013 at
Descanso Gardens in the Sturt Haaga Gallery

The WILD Flowers, Nature ReimaginedThe WILD Flowers presents work by 17 contemporary artists who live and work in California.  The show was conceived and curated to complement the exhibition When They Were Wild, which opens March 9, 2013, at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens.  

Running concurrently with the WILD Flowers are works of contemporary botanical illustration provided by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California.  This exhibit is presented in the Boddy House’s Heritage Gallery and features selected works by Suzanne Kuuskmae, Joan Keesey, Janice Sharp, Deborah Shaw, and Gilly Shaeffer.

Both exhibits are free with admission and open during regular business hours: the Sturt Haaga Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Mondays.

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