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by Deb Shaw

Promotional for Roger's Gardens "Day of Art," Sunday, March 1 features a painting in progress that BAGSC member Clara Josephs was working on during the last year's "Day of Art" at Roger's.

Promotional for Roger’s Gardens “Day of Art,” Sunday, March 1 features a painting in progress that BAGSC member Clara Josephs was working on during the last year’s “Day of Art” at Roger’s.

Roger’s Garden is proud to present their 3rd Annual “Day of Art,” Sunday, March 1 from 10  AM – 4 PM. (In case of rain, this event will be cancelled until further notice.) For the event schedule, visit the Roger’s Gardens’ Art Gallery page.

This Springtime event attracts 50 invited plein air and botanical artists painting and drawing in the Gardens for the day. A painting by each of the participating artists will be on display and available to the public for purchase. This year Roger’s will be judging the 50 original artworks with awards and recognitions.

Open to the public at no charge, all visitors will have the opportunity to participate in scheduled workshops and demonstrations.

BAGSC members Diane Daly, Clara Josephs, Patricia Mark and Deborah Shaw will be participating in the event, and BAGSC will have an information table about botanical art, our group, and our upcoming events and plans. Deborah, Clara, and Diane will be teaching a free “Drawing in your garden” introductory botanical art workshop from 2 pm to 3 pm on that afternoon. The workshop is free and open to the public, no art experience required. Roger’s Gardens will supply basic drawing materials, or participants can bring additional supplies.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Rd., Corona Del Mar, CA 92625, 949.640.5800.

 

by Diane Daly, Dr. Jennifer Funk, and Deb Shaw

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

If you’re looking for additional “legume” inspiration during the holidays, we have two lists for you. The first was developed for us by Dr. Jennifer Funk, Associate Professor in the Schmid College of Science and Technology, Chapman University. This is a brief list of just a few representative legumes, showing the wide variety of plants in this fascinating family:

Agricultural legumes

  • Glycine max (soybean)
  • Medicago sativa (alfalfa)
  • Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean)
  • Pisum sativum (pea)

Legumes in desert and semi-arid ecosystems

  • Acmispon – dozens of species including Acmispon glaber (deerweed) which is an early colonizer following fire, and the very beautiful Acmispon wrangelianus, which can tolerate harsh serpentine soils
  • Astragalus – dozens of beautiful milkvetch species, including rare natives like Astragalus claranus, Astragalus clevelandii, and Astragalus funereus
  • Caesalpinia pulcherrima
  • Calliandra eriophylla
  • Dalea mollissima
  • Hosackia – many species with spectacular flowers including Hosackia stipularis
  • Lathyrus – many species including the lovely beach-goer Lathyrus littoralis
  • Lupinus – many species with yellow or purple flowers, and slender herbs to large shrubs
  • Pediomelum californicum
  • Pickeringia montana (chaparral pea)
  • Psorothamnus – several species with spectacular flowering stalks
  • Trifolium – a diverse genus of clovers including my favorite Trifolium depauperatum (cowbag clover)

Weedy and invasive legumes

  • Acacia dealbata
  • Genista monspessulana (French broom)
  • Medicago polymorpha (burclover)
  • Melilotus officinalis
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Trifolium hirtum
  • Vicia sativa

Leguminous trees

  • Acacia dealbata
  • Acacia koa, Hawaiian tree used for beautiful reddish wood
  • Bauhinia species (can be found at arboretums)
  • Cercis occidentalis (western redbud)
  • Erythrina – many species can be found at arborteums
  • Olneya tesota (ironwood)
  • Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite)
  • Sophora chrysophylla (mamane), a Hawaiian tree that provides food for the endangered Palila bird

The second list is of “Artist’s Choices,” legume subjects BAGSC members have painted, are painting, or are thinking about painting. Don’t panic if you see something you’ve painted (or are thinking of painting) on the following list. This is only a preliminary list, and it’s always fun to see the same subject painted by different people. If you haven’t sent your subject to Diane Daly, please do so. We will be using our subject lists to develop educational outreach materials with Jennifer’s students.

  • Melanie Campbell-Carter: Snail vine (Viga caracalla)
  • Diane Daly: Pink trumpet tree (Tabebuia impetiginosa), Mexican Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia pulcherrima)
  • Clara Josephs: Desert false indigo with dogface butterfly, Carob tree
  • Joan Keesey: Wisteria, Coral Tree, Lupine
  • Suzanne Kuuskmae: Lupine, wisteria
  • Pat Mark: Hyacinth bean
  • Mitsuko Schultz: Sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus)
  • Deborah Shaw: Castanospermum australe, Papago Bean/seeds, Acacia (wattle bush)
  • Patty VanOsterhoudt: Desert Museum x Parkinsidium Parkinsonia x Cercidium (Palo Verde)
  • Leslie Walker: Delonix regia

Happy painting!

By Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

The plans for the BAGSC/Chapman University Leatherby Library Legume Exhibition are coming together! Once again, January 2015 will be a busy month for BAGSC members, with exhibition deadlines and shows all arriving at the same time.

The theme of this Chapman exhibition will focus on botanical specimens of plants in the Legume Family (Leguminosae or Fabaceae). The third largest of all the vascular, flowering plants, legumes have approximately 630 genera and 18,000 species. Legumes are herbs, vines, shrubs and trees—all highly diverse and spread throughout most of the world.

Jennifer Funk‘s research students will be contributing to the educational outreach for this exhibition, writing descriptions of:

  • The family characteristics (what makes a legume a legume);
  • Their importance to agriculture and soils;
  • The legumes of the desert and survival adaptations in dry conditions;
  • The legumes that are nasty weeds in our yards;
  • The legumes that grow to be trees; and more.
Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

We are hoping to show the widest variety possible of this fascinating and massive botanical plant family, and are coordinating our paintings with the research and educational outreach. Towards that goal, we would like to hear what plants BAGSC members are painting (or have painted) and are planning to submit. We will publish the list, along with any “gaps” and suggestions for plants that would fill those gaps if members are interested in adding those to their submissions. Please send information about your artwork (or artwork you are thinking about) to Diane Daly.

This exhibition will coincide with the Tenth Anniversary of the Leatherby Libraries. In conjunction with the Leatherby Libraries staff, we are planning invitations, brochure handouts, signage and a reception, as well as other possible educational and botanical art programs. We will need lots of volunteers; please let Diane know if you can help.

Important dates to remember:
Submission deadline: January 16, 2015
Acceptance notification: January 23, 2015
Artwork delivery: On or before February 17, 2015
Exhibition set-up: February 17, 2015
Tentative reception date: February 25, 2015, Leatherby Library, 2nd Floor, 5:30 pm
Exhibition end (and take down): March 26, 2015

Download the Entry Form by clicking this link: bagscChapmanLegume15. Have some ideas for a title? Send those to Diane too! (And yes, you may also send poems and lyrics along the lines of the children’s tune “Beans, beans, the musical fruit…”)

Happy painting!

by Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

Treasurers' student working on a beautiful watercolor. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Treasurers’ student working on a beautiful watercolor of a sunflower. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

The James Irvine Foundation generously provides grants to the Bowers Museum Treasures Program. Bowers, in turn, uses the grants to reach out to the senior community. One way to engage older adults who may be feeling isolated is through art. The Treasures program reaches out to senior centers, community centers, libraries, social service agencies and residential communities by offering lectures, films, classes and tours.

The Council on Aging of Orange County is one of those agencies that works with the Bowers Treasures program. Since 1973, their mission has been to promote independence, health and dignity of older adults through compassion, education and advocacy. I have had the most rewarding experience and opportunity to teach a botanical drawing and painting class to the seniors at the Council on Aging. They provide translators since some of the seniors speak minimal English. I went home after the first class and brushed up on my Spanish and learned a greeting in Korean. The language differences seem to disappear when we are all involved in the art process of observing and drawing a fruit or plant. For eight sessions, we had a variety of specimens, starting with an apple and pear, a single tulip, a zinnia, a variety of peppers and chilis, a rose and finishing with a sunflower. It was pure joy to see the delight on their faces as they walked in and saw what the subject would be for the day.

Students who were completely blind (but formerly sighted) were able to produce beautiful drawings. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Students who are completely blind (but formerly sighted) were able to produce beautiful drawings. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

At first, when I was briefed on what the class should entail, I was told that there would be a few adults who were totally blind or had some sight impairment. Now, after all these years of trying to get as much detail in a botanical painting, I was truly baffled on how a blind person would be able to draw and how would I be able to teach them anything about drawing a flower. But, I was the one to learn a few things about drawing. They were able to feel the fruit or flower with their hands, emboss the paper with firm pressure on the pencil, use circle templates for guidance, and feel where to fill in the shape with color, with the aid of an assistant. I was amazed at the results. It is not botanical art as we know it, but is art that helps bring people together and give them pleasure and satisfaction. I made simple portfolios for them to take their drawings and paintings home on the last day.

Treasures' student drawing a radish in graphite. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Treasures’ student drawing a radish in graphite. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

I had another opportunity through the Treasures program to teach a class on painting Asian flowers on parasols. Since there were 90 adults coming to this program, we used markers instead of paint. With 90 parasols opened and everyone drawing flowers on them, it was quite a challenge to move around to all the tables. Once again, I was delighted at the results; beautiful, original designs on all the parasols. The parasols were used for a display in the museum that weekend for a cultural event. They were able to take home the parasols, as well as all the other art projects that they created.

Diane Daly giving feedback to Treasures' student. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Diane Daly giving feedback to Treasures’ student. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

by Deb Shaw

Joan and John Keesey took the Great Park Hot Air Balloon Ride the day they dropped off Joan's artwork. This is their report and picture from the Hot Air Balloon. Honorary BAGSC member John wrote, "The art galleries are just above the balloon shadow with the palms in between. I think your show is going to be in the one closest to the balloon shadow, but what do I know."

Joan and John Keesey took the Great Park Hot Air Balloon Ride the day they dropped off Joan’s artwork. This is their report and picture from the Hot Air Balloon. Honorary BAGSC member John wrote, “The art galleries are just above the balloon shadow with the palms in between. I think your show is going to be in the one closest to the balloon shadow, but what do I know?”

The Orange County Great Park is pleased to announce the opening reception for “Paper Farm: Works on Paper” to be held:

Sunday, May 4, 2014
12:00pm—3:00pm
Great Park Artists Studios

The exhibition will continue from May 4 until June 8, 2014.

ARTISTS STUDIOS HOURS
Saturdays & Sundays
10:00am—4:00pm

“Paper Farm: Works on Paper” is an exhibition illustrating Southern California farm life and detailing regional plants and animals using ink, paint, pencil, and watercolor. BAGSC members Diane Daly, Clara Josephs, Joan Keesey, Terri Munroe, Mitsuko Schultz, Janice Sharp, and Deborah Shaw have artwork in the exhibition.

A lot will be happening at The Great Park on that same day, May 4, including The Groves Antique Market and the Certified Farmers Market.

The Groves Antique Market has antiques, fine art and collectibles for sale, and is located on the runways behind the Great Park.

The Certified Farmers Market features fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables, handcrafted artisan products, live music and entertainment, car shows, and a selection of gourmet food trucks. You can also explore the Farm + Food Lab and talk to UCCE Master Gardeners about home gardening tips. The Farmers Market will be open early May 4, at 8 am, and is dog and pet-friendly, too.

The Living Room Talks program will also take place in the Gallery at 1:00pm on that Sunday. The Living Room Talks at the Great Park Gallery provide a community gathering place for engaging conversations with local artists. Sunday’s artists include Bianca Barragan, a writer and one of five co-founders of the LA Zine Fest, and Yumi Sakugawa, a comic book artist.

Field trips for 1st grade students have been ongoing since March, and have included the art exhibition. The students have enjoyed the show and are inspired by the creativity.

Directions can be found on the website, and on each of the linked pages listed above. Parking and admission are free. And yes, there will be balloon rides, soaring 400 feet above the park. Availability to fly is on a first-come, first-serve basis and dependent on wind and weather conditions. Prices for balloon rides are: Adults (19 and older), $10.00; Children (18 and younger with paid adult), free; Children (12 – 18 years old, without paid adult), $5.00.

By Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

 

Postcard invitation for the opening for Butterflies of Iguazú Falls, Argentina, by Bill Cooper.

Postcard invitation for the opening for Butterflies of Iguazú Falls, Argentina, by Bill Cooper.

Chapman University Leatherby Libraries will have an exhibit of butterfly photography, The Butterflies of Iguazú Falls, Argentina, by Bill Cooper, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and UC Irvine. A book signing, lecture and reception will be held on Friday February 7, 2014, from 4:30-6 pm on the second floor of the library.

The event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on display February 7 – March 31, 2014.

Chapman University Leatherby Libraries is located on the Chapman University campus at: 1 University Dr, Orange, CA 92866. The phone number is 714.532.7756.

by Deb Shaw

Janice Sharp (left) and Pat Mark (right) demonstrating and staffing the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table.

Janice Sharp (left) and Pat Mark (right) demonstrating and staffing the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. photo by Peter Conlon

On Saturday, February 2, 2013, BAGSC participated in Roger’s Garden’s first “Day of Art” in Newport Beach. Fifty artists, using different media participated in a full day of drawing and painting demonstrations and workshops. The “Day of Art” was free to the public and for all ages.

Pat Mark talking with visitors to the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. The Information Table also displayed books, originals and prints of contemporary and historical botanical art and scientific illustration. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Pat Mark talking with visitors to the BAGSC Botanical Art Information Table. The Information Table also displayed books, originals and prints of contemporary and historical botanical art and scientific illustration. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Additionally, BAGSC had an interactive table where visitors could explore the botany (and some unusual) fruits and vegetables, and make stamp prints with them. BAGSC also had a botanical art information table, with a display of originals, prints and books of all kinds of botanical art, from scientific illustration to plant portraits, historical and current.

Tania Marien at the BAGSC Interactive Table, photo by Deb Shaw.

Tania Marien at the BAGSC Interactive Table, photo by Deb Shaw.

BAGSC artists participating included: Diane Daly, Clara Josephs, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Sue Kuuskmae, Alyse Ochniak, Tania Marien, Deborah Shaw, Pat Mark, and Janice Sharp.

Tania Marien and Deb Shaw gave a two-hour workshop in the afternoon in the outdoor amphitheater on drawing flowers and leaves in pencil, with drawing boards, drawing paper and pencils provided by Roger’s. A watercolor and pastel workshop was offered in the morning by plein aire artists David Damm and Gill Dillinger,  and a gourmet food truck, “Bite Me Foods” provided lunch for those who were hungry.

Tania Marien and visitors to the BAGSC Interactive Table. Kids of all ages used fruits and vegetables to create stamp art.

Tania Marien and visitors to the BAGSC Interactive Table. Kids of all ages used fruits and vegetables to create stamp art.

The event had been postponed from the previous Saturday due to rain. The weather held out this Saturday, and the event was packed with enthusiastic participants, even with the change in schedule. People and their dogs strolled the grounds, bought plants and took in the art.

Attendees were eager to watch the demonstrations, and BAGSC members spent the day talking about botanical art, different media and techniques to interested customers. Many inquired about botanical art classes and were complimentary about the day’s events. Roger’s reported overwhelmingly positive comments from their guests.

Thank you to all who participated, and to Roger’s for hosting the event. We hope there will be more in the future!

Deb Shaw (left) and Tania Marien (right) teaching a workshop about how to draw flowers and leaves in pencil. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw (left) and Tania Marien (right) teaching a workshop about how to draw flowers and leaves in pencil. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw expressively describing the morphology of a banana inflorescence to Theresa Marino from Roger's Gardens. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Deb Shaw expressively describing the morphology of a banana inflorescence to Theresa Marino from Roger’s Gardens. Photo by Peter Conlon.

Sue Kuuskmae chose to draw in the shade section of the nursery, near a fountain. Photo by Deb Shaw.

Sue Kuuskmae chose to draw in the shade section of the nursery, near a fountain. Photo by Deb Shaw.

Clara Josephs (left) and Diane Daly (right) discuss botanical art and painting with visitors.

Clara Josephs (left) and Diane Daly (right) discuss botanical art and painting with visitors.

Alyse Ochniak demonstrating in the garden, photo by Deb Shaw.

Alyse Ochniak demonstrating in the garden, photo by Deb Shaw.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence demonstrating in the garden (in the luxurious outdoor furniture section). Photo by Deb Shaw.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence demonstrating in the garden (in the luxurious outdoor furniture section). Photo by Deb Shaw.

By Joan Keesey

Thread-leaved Brodiaea, Second Place by Deborah Shaw

Thread-leaved Brodiaea, Second Place, by Deborah Shaw, watercolor on Kelmscott Vellum © 2012

It was very gratifying to see the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) so well represented at the Botanical Art Exhibit at the CNPS Conservation Conference 2012 in San Diego at the Town and Country Resort. There were thirteen pictures by seven BAGSC members: Diane Daly, Estelle DeRidder, Clara Josephs, Joan Keesey, Janice Sharp, Deborah Shaw, and Dorthea Yellot. Members of our group won some prizes as well: Deborah Shaw received a second place ribbon for her watercolor on vellum of Thread-leaved Brodiaea; Joan Keesey won a third place ribbon for her watercolor of Snake Lilies and Elegant Madia; Estelle DeRidder won an honorable mention for her colored pencil of Hummingbird Sage.

Snake Lily & Elegant Madia, Third Place, by Joan Keesey, watercolor © 2012

Snake Lily & Elegant Madia, Third Place, by Joan Keesey, watercolor © 2012

My husband and I visited the exhibit twice—once on Thursday evening and again on Saturday afternoon. On both visits there were 12-15 enthusiastic conference attendees who had taken the trouble to make the trip to the ninth floor of the Regency Towers to see the botanical art and photography.  Generally the conference attendees were biologists, botanists, geologists, environmentalists and land managers—a different crowd from the usual botanical art group. The focus at most botanical art exhibits is on the artistic aspects of a work—composition, values, and technique. While this group was very appreciative of the skill displayed in the compositions, they were equally if not more interested in and enthusiastic about the actual subject matter. You overheard people say things like: “Oh, that is my favorite plant”;  “Have you ever seen that beautiful sage.”; or “This is such and interesting plant. I saw it for the first time on that hike along the Merced.”

Hummingbird Sage, Honorable Mention, by Estelle DeRidder, colored pencil © 2012

Hummingbird Sage, Honorable Mention, by Estelle DeRidder, colored pencil © 2012

This is the second CNPS exhibit that I have participated in, and I thought that the pictures were better displayed and of a higher quality. I am particularly interested in California Native Plants, so I find a show like this a real treat. I also like botanical exhibits where there is a focus or theme. I find the juxtaposition of “Turnips & Tulips”, “Corn and Camellias”, “Radishes & Roses”, jarring and difficult to evaluate.   I hope BAGSC will consider sponsoring exhibits that are more focused—a plant family such as the mustard, pea, rose or lily family, plants of a particular region, trees, succulents, etc. The options are endless, but I think it makes a more interesting and informative exhibit.

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