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by Deb Shaw

Erythrina caffra, Coral Tree, original watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Erythrina caffra, Coral Tree, original watercolor by Joan Keesey, © 2015, all rights reserved.

The Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC), in conjunction with Dr. Jennifer Funk and students from the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Chapman University, will be opening an exhibition of botanical art entitled “An Illuminating Look at Legumes.”

Held in conjunction with the 10th Anniversary of the Chapman University Leatherby Libraries, the exhibition explores the large, economically important plant family Fabaceae or Leguminosae, commonly known as legumes, peas, or beans.

Exhibit dates:
Thursday, February 19 – Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Artists’ Reception and Demonstrations:
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
5:30 p.m.

Doy and Dee Henley Reading Room
Leatherby Libraries, 2nd Floor, Chapman University
One University Drive, Orange, California 92866

Legumes are the third largest flowering plant family on earth, after orchids (Orchidaceae) and daisies (Asteraceae). They are incredibly diverse, ranging from huge trees, twining, vigorous vines to small delicate annuals and even a few aquatic plants. They grow all over the world, except in Antarctica and the high Arctic.

Many legumes have a unique ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen through their root nodules, and, in doing so can replenish our soils and colonize barren areas.

Accompanied by interesting descriptions of the plants by Dr. Funk, her students and BAGSC members, the artists have depicted members of this family that are important agriculturally; thrive in desert and semi-arid environments; are weedy and invasive; and grow as trees.

Artists include: Cristina Baltayian, Melanie Campbell-Carter, Diane Daly, Estelle DeRidder, Cynthia F. Jackson, Clara Josephs, Joan Keesey, Suzanne Kuuskmae, Patricia A. Mark, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Terri Munroe, Alyse Ochniak, Robyn Reilman, Mitsuko Schultz, Janice Sharp, Deborah B. Shaw, and Jude Wiesenfeld.

This exhibition has been sponsored by BAGSC, Chapman University Leatherby Libraries, and Chapman University Schmid College of Science and Technology.

For exhibit hours please visit: www.chapman.edu/library/info/hours.html

Visitor parking near the Leatherby Libraries is available for $2.00 – $3.00 and may be purchased from the permit dispenser. For more detailed parking information, fees, maps and directions to Chapman University, please visit: www.chapman.edu/map

by Deb Shaw and Diane Daly

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

We’re updating our list of who is painting which Legumes for the Chapman University Exhibition in the Leatherby Libraries. [Just updated New Year’s Day — keep ’em coming and Happy New Year!]

The Legumes Exhibition follows closely on the heels of the Camellia Show at Descanso! (Each year, January seems to get busier and busier for BAGSC members!) Don’t forget that the entry forms for the Legume Exhibition are due the same day, Friday, January 16, 2015 that the Camellia Show will be staged and hung. Entry forms should be emailed or mailed, on or before that date to Diane Daly.

The list below are the Legume subjects BAGSC members have painted, are painting, or are thinking about painting. Don’t panic if you see something you’ve painted (or are thinking of painting) on the following list. This is only a preliminary list, and it’s always fun to see the same subject painted by different people. If you haven’t sent your subject to Diane Daly, please do so. We will be using our subject list to develop educational outreach materials with Dr. Jennifer Funk’s students.

  • Cristina Baltayian: Coral Tree, Papago Beans, Tamarind Pods
  • Melanie Campbell-Carter: Snail Vine (Viga caracalla)
  • Diane Daly: Mexican Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia pulcherrima), Calliandra Eriophylla
  • Cynthia Jackson: Knife Acacia (Acacia cultriformis)
  • Clara Josephs: Desert False Indigo with Dogface Butterfly, Carob Tree
  • Joan Keesey: Wisteria, Coral Tree, Lupine
  • Suzanne Kuuskmae: Lupine, Wisteria, Vicia sativa
  • Pat Mark: Hyacinth Bean
  • Arillyn Moran-Lawrence: Shelling Pea, Green Arrow, Pisum sativum (Heirloom), plus hopefully one more
  • Robyn Reilman, Acacia Stenophylla
  • Mitsuko Schultz: Sweet Pea (Lathyrus odoratus)
  • Janice Sharp: Western Redbud (Cercis occidentalis), Sweet Pea (Lathyrus odoratus), and Australian native
    Wistera Hardenbergia violacea
  • Deborah Shaw: Castanospermum australe (if it gets done!), Acacia seed pod (Wattle Bush)
  • Patty VanOsterhoudt: Desert Museum x Parkinsidium Parkinsonia x Cercidium (Palo Verde)
  • Leslie Walker: Delonix regia

Need inspiration for your artwork? (There’s still time!) See some of Dr. Funk’s suggestions in our prior BAGSC News Blog article.

by Diane Daly, Dr. Jennifer Funk, and Deb Shaw

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

If you’re looking for additional “legume” inspiration during the holidays, we have two lists for you. The first was developed for us by Dr. Jennifer Funk, Associate Professor in the Schmid College of Science and Technology, Chapman University. This is a brief list of just a few representative legumes, showing the wide variety of plants in this fascinating family:

Agricultural legumes

  • Glycine max (soybean)
  • Medicago sativa (alfalfa)
  • Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean)
  • Pisum sativum (pea)

Legumes in desert and semi-arid ecosystems

  • Acmispon – dozens of species including Acmispon glaber (deerweed) which is an early colonizer following fire, and the very beautiful Acmispon wrangelianus, which can tolerate harsh serpentine soils
  • Astragalus – dozens of beautiful milkvetch species, including rare natives like Astragalus claranus, Astragalus clevelandii, and Astragalus funereus
  • Caesalpinia pulcherrima
  • Calliandra eriophylla
  • Dalea mollissima
  • Hosackia – many species with spectacular flowers including Hosackia stipularis
  • Lathyrus – many species including the lovely beach-goer Lathyrus littoralis
  • Lupinus – many species with yellow or purple flowers, and slender herbs to large shrubs
  • Pediomelum californicum
  • Pickeringia montana (chaparral pea)
  • Psorothamnus – several species with spectacular flowering stalks
  • Trifolium – a diverse genus of clovers including my favorite Trifolium depauperatum (cowbag clover)

Weedy and invasive legumes

  • Acacia dealbata
  • Genista monspessulana (French broom)
  • Medicago polymorpha (burclover)
  • Melilotus officinalis
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Trifolium hirtum
  • Vicia sativa

Leguminous trees

  • Acacia dealbata
  • Acacia koa, Hawaiian tree used for beautiful reddish wood
  • Bauhinia species (can be found at arboretums)
  • Cercis occidentalis (western redbud)
  • Erythrina – many species can be found at arborteums
  • Olneya tesota (ironwood)
  • Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite)
  • Sophora chrysophylla (mamane), a Hawaiian tree that provides food for the endangered Palila bird

The second list is of “Artist’s Choices,” legume subjects BAGSC members have painted, are painting, or are thinking about painting. Don’t panic if you see something you’ve painted (or are thinking of painting) on the following list. This is only a preliminary list, and it’s always fun to see the same subject painted by different people. If you haven’t sent your subject to Diane Daly, please do so. We will be using our subject lists to develop educational outreach materials with Jennifer’s students.

  • Melanie Campbell-Carter: Snail vine (Viga caracalla)
  • Diane Daly: Pink trumpet tree (Tabebuia impetiginosa), Mexican Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia pulcherrima)
  • Clara Josephs: Desert false indigo with dogface butterfly, Carob tree
  • Joan Keesey: Wisteria, Coral Tree, Lupine
  • Suzanne Kuuskmae: Lupine, wisteria
  • Pat Mark: Hyacinth bean
  • Mitsuko Schultz: Sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus)
  • Deborah Shaw: Castanospermum australe, Papago Bean/seeds, Acacia (wattle bush)
  • Patty VanOsterhoudt: Desert Museum x Parkinsidium Parkinsonia x Cercidium (Palo Verde)
  • Leslie Walker: Delonix regia

Happy painting!

By Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

The plans for the BAGSC/Chapman University Leatherby Library Legume Exhibition are coming together! Once again, January 2015 will be a busy month for BAGSC members, with exhibition deadlines and shows all arriving at the same time.

The theme of this Chapman exhibition will focus on botanical specimens of plants in the Legume Family (Leguminosae or Fabaceae). The third largest of all the vascular, flowering plants, legumes have approximately 630 genera and 18,000 species. Legumes are herbs, vines, shrubs and trees—all highly diverse and spread throughout most of the world.

Jennifer Funk‘s research students will be contributing to the educational outreach for this exhibition, writing descriptions of:

  • The family characteristics (what makes a legume a legume);
  • Their importance to agriculture and soils;
  • The legumes of the desert and survival adaptations in dry conditions;
  • The legumes that are nasty weeds in our yards;
  • The legumes that grow to be trees; and more.
Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Red Bird of Paradise, or Mexican Bird of Paradise, watercolor by Diane Daly, © 2013, all rights reserved.

We are hoping to show the widest variety possible of this fascinating and massive botanical plant family, and are coordinating our paintings with the research and educational outreach. Towards that goal, we would like to hear what plants BAGSC members are painting (or have painted) and are planning to submit. We will publish the list, along with any “gaps” and suggestions for plants that would fill those gaps if members are interested in adding those to their submissions. Please send information about your artwork (or artwork you are thinking about) to Diane Daly.

This exhibition will coincide with the Tenth Anniversary of the Leatherby Libraries. In conjunction with the Leatherby Libraries staff, we are planning invitations, brochure handouts, signage and a reception, as well as other possible educational and botanical art programs. We will need lots of volunteers; please let Diane know if you can help.

Important dates to remember:
Submission deadline: January 16, 2015
Acceptance notification: January 23, 2015
Artwork delivery: On or before February 17, 2015
Exhibition set-up: February 17, 2015
Tentative reception date: February 25, 2015, Leatherby Library, 2nd Floor, 5:30 pm
Exhibition end (and take down): March 26, 2015

Download the Entry Form by clicking this link: bagscChapmanLegume15. Have some ideas for a title? Send those to Diane too! (And yes, you may also send poems and lyrics along the lines of the children’s tune “Beans, beans, the musical fruit…”)

Happy painting!

by Clara Josephs, posted by Deb Shaw

Before: The BAGSC crew arrives and unpacks artwork.

Before: The BAGSC crew arrives and unpacks artwork. Thank you to all the BAGSC members (and supporters) who came to help!

The Chapman show, “Drought Tolerant Beauty”, is up and it is stunning! There are  59 pieces by 18 of our members. The art is arranged through the gallery areas by drought tolerant mechanisms.  Dr. Jennifer Funk’s students have written wonderful commentaries to accompany the groupings.

Our Artist Reception is Thursday evening, February 7 from 7 – 9 pm.

In addition to the tasty hors d’oeuvres and adult libations, Dr. Funk will talk briefly about her involvement with restoration ecology and drought tolerant plants.

Sorting artwork into drought-tolerant categories.

Sorting artwork into drought-tolerant categories.

Plan to attend with your family and friends. Even if you don’t have a piece in the show, you will enjoy seeing this collection of works by our members. You will see work that was inspired by Anita Walsmit Sachs’  workshop, works in a variety of media, and some very unique ways of composing challenging subjects.

Take time to notice the framing. Almost all the paintings were framed to ASBA show specifications, using a blonde L profile frame. Many of the frames are the Dick Blick renewable bamboo frame we recommended. Several frames are “look-alikes” that blend perfectly with the Dick Blick frame. Do you like the standardized framing look? Proponents say it helps focus attention on the art, and give the art a more professional, less “décor” appearance. Let us know what you think!

Pausing to admire the beautiful art.

Pausing to admire the beautiful art.

If you would like to demonstrate during the reception, please call or email Diane Daly. If you weren’t able to paint for the show, demonstrating during the reception is another great way to participate!

Don’t forget to WEAR YOUR BAGSC NAME TAG! If you don’t have one, please let Deb Shaw know and she will bring one for you.

Looking forward to seeing everyone on the evening of February 7.

 

 

Dr. Jennifer Funk, ecologist with Chapman University, helps categorize the art.

Dr. Jennifer Funk, ecologist with Chapman University, helps categorize the art.

Laurie Gates Cussalli, Chapman University, demonstrates the hanging wire system.

Laurie Gates Cussalli, Chapman University, demonstrates the hanging wire system.

The "Succulent Leaves" Category is up on the wall, waiting for signage and labels.

The “Succulent Leaves” Category is up on the wall, waiting for signage and labels.

The exhibition continues on the other side.

The exhibition continues on the other side.

by Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

The Chapman University exhibition and opening reception are coming together! Diane Daly was interviewed by Julie Bawden-Davis for the Old Towne Orange Plaza Review. Read the column “Botanical Art” in Garden Clippings.

Front side of Announcement/Invitation postcard for the "Drought Tolerant Beauty" exhibition at Chapman University.

Front side of Announcement/Invitation postcard for the “Drought Tolerant Beauty” exhibition at Chapman University.

The announcement postcards/opening reception invitation have been printed for “Drought Tolerant Beauty: Artists and Students Respond to California’s Changing Environment”.

The 5″ x 7″ postcards are available for BAGSC members to send to their mailing lists. Please let Deb know the quantity you would like to receive by Friday, 18 January. A BAGSC team will package them all up on the weekend and put them in the mail for you by Monday.

by Diane Daly and Clara Josephs, posted by Deb Shaw

January’s coming up fast, and the Chapman University Leatherby Library Drought Tolerant Plant Exhibition will be upon us (along with all the other exhibition opportunities we have stacked up for the month — but more on those later!).

Students from Jennifer Funk‘s Ecology course currently are writing descriptions of the plants’ drought-tolerant traits now. We are planning to have at least one species that fits into each of the following seven categories:

  • Drought-deciduousness (plants that lose their leaves during the dry season, or during periods of dryness)
  • Small leaves (better adapted to dry soils and conditions)
  • Deep taproot (a tap root that penetrates deep into the ground can access water when it is scarce during a drought or dry conditions, as well as store water in the root)
  • Succulent leaves (thick, fleshy leaves and stems can store water)
  • Pubescent leaves (pubescent, or furry leaves can slow the air flowing over the leaf to reduce water evaporation, hold water, reflect sunlight, and provide shade for the surface of the leaf)
  • Evergreen, sclerophylous leaves (evergreen leaves, of course, stay on the plant year-round; sclerophylous leaves have a hard surface and are frequently spaced close together
  • Annual life habit (one way to avoid dry periods is to quickly grow, bloom and develop seeds during the wet season, skipping the dry season altogether!)

Important Deadlines:

  • Artist entry deadline:  January 11 (BAGSC needs the list for handouts, Chapman University needs the list for labels and insurance)
  • Set up show in Henley reading room: January 25
  • Reception: February 7 , 7-9 pm
  • Take down the show: February 25

All BAGSC members will receive an email with the official BAGSC “Call for Entries” packet. If you do not receive this email with the attachment by 30 November, please contact Deb.

Drought Tolerant Plant Choices for the Chapman Exhibition

The following are plants that BAGSC members are planning to submit. Botanical and common names, of course, will need to be reviewed and verified. Don’t worry if you have to change your mind, or if you’re already painting something that someone else is painting on the list below. This is a preliminary list and is not set in cement. Space allowing, species duplicates will be accepted (see the Call for Entries packet).

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence:   
Dudleya Farinosa; Salvia Chamaedroyides, Electric blue sage; Desert Marigold, Baileya multiradiata; Echeveria graptoveria or Kalanchoe thyrsiflora

Bonnie Ash:
Agave Utahensis var. nevadensis; Pacific Mist Manzanita, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Linda Ericksen:
Prickly pear cactus, Opuntia

Joan Keesey:
California Buckeye Flower, Aesculus californica; Flannel Bush, Fremontodendron; California Poppy Eschscholzia californica; Foothill Penstemon, Penstemon heterophyllus;  or Heart Leaf Penstemon, Keckiella cordiforlia; Toyon, Heteromeles arbutifolia; Bush Monkey Flower, Mimulus aurantiacus

Patricia VanOsterhoudt:
Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemai indica; Columbine Aquilegia; Yucca

Sue Kuuskmae:
Fortnight Lily Dietus vegeta; Rock Rose Kalanchoe; Toyonberry; Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri

Estelle DeRidder:
Coastal Prickly Pear, Opuntia littoralis; Baja Fairy Duster, Dalliandra eriophylla; California Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia; Chia, Salvia Columbriae

Clara Josephs:
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica; Topsy Turvy, Echeveria; Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea

Diane Daly:
Island Alum Root, Heuchera maxima; Seaside Daisy, Erigeron glaucus; Bird of Paradise, Caesalpinia pulcherrima

Carmen Lindsay:
Bladder Sage; Ocotillo; Buckwheat

Veronica Raymond:
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica; Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea; Nevins Barberry, Mahonia nevinii; Englemann Oak Quercus engelmannii

Cristina Baltayian:
Lemon, C. limon; Bougainvillea; Fig, Ficus carica L. (Brown turkey); Olives, Olea europaea; Cabernet grape vitis vinfera L.; Pomegranate, Punica granatum

Mitsuko Shultz:
Nevins Barberry, Berberis nevinii; California Sycamore, Platanus racemosa

Patricia Mark:
Manfreda masculosa; Aeonium

Deborah Shaw:
Dudleya pulverulenta, Chalk Dudleya; Dudleya viscida, Sticky Dudleya; Arctostaphylos glauca, Big Berry Manzanita

Add your name and plants to the list: contact Diane.

It’s shaping up to be a great show!!!

by Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

Finally, we have the dates for our Chapman show on drought tolerant plants. We will have the Leatherby Library Henley Reading Room and the Clarke wall just like we used in the Brush with Nature exhibit.

We will set up and hang the exhibit on January 25, 2013. We will have an evening reception on February 7, and we will take down the paintings on February 25.

The botanist, Jennifer Funk will have her students write descriptions of drought tolerant plant groups with explanations of how the plants retain moisture and survive the heat.

Reminder, all paintings should be framed in the Dick Blick bamboo frame, white mat, and plexiglass. Use the same label on the back as we do for other exhibits. All members can submit up to four paintings. Paintings can be delivered to Diane Daly’s house the week before Jan 25 or brought to Chapman on that date at 10 am to be hung.

More details will be coming. Questions? Contact Diane Daly or Clara Josephs.

A plant selections list follows below. This list is just a “ working list” to let everyone know what other artists are working on. We hope this will inspire other members to paint for this exhibit. Don’t worry if you’re interested in painting something that is already listed below. Duplicates are not automatically excluded. Feel free to add, delete or change, depending on how your paintings are going. Let Diane Daly know. We’ll continue to publish updated lists.

Arillyn Moran-Lawrence
Dudleya Farinosa
Salvia  Chamaedroyides, Electric blue sage
Desert Marigold, Baileya multiradiata
Echeveria graptoveria or Kalanchoe thyrsiflora

Bonnie Ash
Agave Utahensis var. nevadensis
Pacific Mist Manzanita Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Linda Ericksen
Prickly pear cactus, Opuntia

Joan Keesey
California Buckeye Flower, Aesculus californica
Flannel Bush Fremontodendron
California Poppy Eschscholzia californica
Foothill Penstemon Penstemon heterophyllus

Or
Heart Leaf Penstemon Keckiella cordiforlia
Toyon Heteromeles arbutifolia
Bush Monkey Flower Mimulus aurantiacus

Patricia VanOsterhoudt
Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemai indica
Columbine Aquilegia
Mountain Phlox
Yucca (another view)

Sue Kuuskmae
Fortnight Lily, Dietus vegeta
Rock Rose, Kalanchoe
Toyonberry
Matilija poppy, Romneya coulteri

Estelle DeRidder
Coastal Prickly Pear, Opuntia littoralis
Baja Fairy Duster, Dalliandra eriophylla
California Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia
Chia Salvia, Columbriae

Clara Josephs
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica

Diane Daly
Island Alum Root, Heuchera maxima
Seaside Daisy  Erigeron glaucus

Carmen Lindsay
Bladder Sage
Ocotillo
Buckwheat

Veronica Raymond
Coffeeberry, Rhamnus californica
Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea
Nevins Barberry, Mahonia nevinii
Englemann Oak Quercus engelmannii

Deborah Shaw
Fuschia Flowered Gooseberry, Ribes speciosum
Blue-eyed Grass, Sisyrinchium bellum
Chalk Dudleya, Dudleya pulverulenta
White sage, Salvia apiana

Mitsuko Schultz
Nevin’s Barberry, Berberis nevinii
California Sycamore, Platanus racemosa

By Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

If you’re thinking about taking Margaret Best’s 3-day workshop at the Huntington Gardens on July 26, 27, 28, now is the time to reserve your space, and send in your deposit and/or your full class fee.

Participants will bring their own specimens (your choice!) and Margaret will focus on meaningful compositional choices for your personal art, or for creating potential entries into the BAGSC Drought Tolerant Plant Exhibition at Chapman University Library next year (intent to submit to the Exhibition is not a requirement of this class). All mediums are welcome in this workshop. This open medium instruction will be a first for BAGSC. Margaret suggests you bring your usual supplies, that includes your own preferred paper and paints/colored pencils, but she is happy to provide her own color palette choices for both mediums upon request. She can be reached via her website with any questions in regards to supplies.

There are still a few spaces available, and you can read more about this class on the prior post for the BAGSC blog.

So, if you had been contemplating attending, now’s the time to both register and find your subject. The cost for this class will be $300. Hold your space with a $50. non-refundable deposit, check made out to BAGSC and sent to Leslie Walker. Final $250. payment due July 1, 2012. Fabriano 5 paper (only available in Europe) will be available for purchase from the BAGSC inventory at class, three half-sheets for $7.00.

Participants should be selecting plants (for drought-tolerant help call Deborah Shaw or Leslie Walker), and starting sketches, color matching, and composition ideas. The more preparation you do ahead of the class the more you will get out of the class.

by Clara Josephs, posted by Deb Shaw

As we firm up the dates for the Chapman show, now is the time for you to make final decisions about which plants you will portray.

Please email Diane with the names of your selections. As we receive names of plants, the list will be posted monthly on the blog. By checking the blog list, you can make informed decisions as you progress with your paintings for the show.

Several people have asked about duplicate subject matter. We don’t expect a problem with that issue. At the first Chapman show we reserved the right to exclude duplicate subjects if we had too many paintings for the available display space. We had no problem displaying 70 + paintings and probably could have displayed more. This would be our policy again, but this time we would refer to our “Intent” list and give preference to the earliest declarer.

As you know, the exhibit is not only about the plants, but about the artistry in presenting the plant. Certainly, several artists can successful portray the same plant in dramatically different compositions. So don’t let the fact that another artist has declared for a plant stop you from painting a subject you are passionate about. But, do be aware that there is a small chance that if space is tight, some duplicates could be excluded

We hope to announce the exhibit dates very soon. Email Diane as you make your choices. We expect to be able to hang four paintings per member.

By Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

Preparing for an exhibition submission can be an exciting project yet sometimes, also a little daunting. What subject should I pick? Where do I find it? How do I create that particular texture? What type of composition will show the specimen off to its best advantage both in terms of its unique characteristics as well as offer an  aesthetically appealing result? You will be able to get help with all of these elements by signing up for Margaret Best’s 3-day workshop at the Huntington Gardens on July 26, 27, 28.

Margaret will be steering participants towards meaningful compositional choices to kick-start a direction for creating potential entries into the BAGSC Drought Tolerant Plant Exhibition at Chapman University Library next year. Not only has Margaret developed a new format for her workshops, already proven in Bermuda, Canada and recently in Italy, she is also experienced in teaching graphite, watercolor and colored pencil and will be therefore welcoming all mediums in this workshop. This open medium instruction will be a first for BAGSC. Margaret suggests you bring your usual supplies, that include your own preferred paper and paints/colored pencils, but she is happy to provide her own color palette choices for both mediums upon request. She can be reached via her website with any questions in regards to supplies.

What you are required to bring with you is your own specimen. For those of you who love to depict colorful flowers, there are many options in this category too, but you should also be aware that the purpose of the exhibition is to bring a focus on the unique structures of drought tolerant and drought resistant plants as well. And the choice is not restricted to purely Californian natives. Once you have made your selection, it is suggested that you familiarize yourself with the plant by completing preliminary sketches and doing some research into the ways that the plant structures you will be depicting, assist in its toughness to survive in regions that are often subjected to periods of time without water. This pre-workshop preparation time is not a pre-requisite to attend (nor is there a pressure to exhibit if you do not wish to do so) but it will help you progress more efficiently with a compositional direction and give you more time for color application and technical assistance.

So the time to both register and start looking for a subject is right away. Don’t miss this opportunity to be a part of this wonderful exhibition but also to be able to prepare for it with Margaret Best.

The cost for this class will be $300. Hold your space with a $50. non-refundable deposit, check made out to BAGSC and sent to Leslie Walker. Final $250. payment due July 1, 2012. Fabriano 5 paper (only available in Europe) will be available for purchase from the BAGSC inventory at class, three half-sheets for $7.00.

Participants should be selecting plants (for help call Deborah Shaw or Leslie Walker) now, and starting sketches, color matching, & composition ideas. The more preparation you do ahead of the class the more you will get out of the class.

See you there!

by Clara Josephs and Deb Shaw

Many BAGSC members have been asking about where they can find information about drought-tolerant plants. You can find a lot of information about drought tolerant plants on the web. Here is a section from the Wikipedia entry I was directed to after googling “lemonade berry”:

Rhus integrifolia, the Lemonade Berry’s leaves are simple (unusual in a genus where most species are trifoliate), alternating, evergreen and leathery, ranging from two to four centimeters wide on reddish twigs; length of leaves is five to seven centimeters. Leaves are toothed with a waxy appearance above and a paler tone below. The flowers which appear from February to May are small, clustered closely together, and may be either bisexual or pistillate.[1]

These fragrant flowers exhibit radial symmetry with five green sepals, five white to rosy-pink petals, and five stamens. The small flowers are only six millimeters across. The ovary is superior and usually has a single ovule; although in pistillate flowers, the stamens are small and infertile. The mature fruit of Rhus integrifolia is sticky, reddish, covered with hairs, and about seven to ten millimeters in diameter. The elliptical fruit presents tight clusters at the very ends of twigs.

Young plants manifest smooth reddish bark, while more mature individuals have cracked, even scaly, grayish bark with the smooth red bark displayed underneath. Twigs are rather stout and flexible, and reddish bud ends are diminutive and pointed. There is often a multi-furcate branching structure from the base of the plant. A mature plant is large and thicket-like with a sprawling arrangement.

Notice how many painting cues for color and structure are in that entry! It also tells me when it flowers.  Very useful and free information! Next, if I hit “images” for lemonade berry – bingo – what a selection!

The following is a list of California Native plants and their drought-tolerant adaptive strategies, compiled for us by Jennifer Funk, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology. Please keep in mind that the exhibition is open to any drought-tolerant plants from around the world, not just California natives! This list was handed out at a BAGSC Quarterly meeting earlier this year. Future articles on the blog will list characteristics of drought-tolerant plants.

Let us know your questions, or any future articles you would like to see on the blog about drought-tolerant plants.

A few drought-tolerant species, all native to southern California:
Scientific name, Common name

Drought deciduous (plants that drop their leaves during dry season or periods of dryness)
Achillea millefolium, Common Yarrow
Calliandra eriophylla, Pink Fairy Duster
Encelia californica, California Bush Sunflower
Encelia farinosa, Brittlebush
Keckellia antirhhinum, Yellow Bush Penstemon
Ribes aureum, Golden currant

Small leaves (small leaves have a reduced surface area, and so lose less water)
Adenostoma fasciculatum, Chamise
Arctostaphylos species, Manzanita
Artemisia californica, California sagebush
Ceanothus species, Ceanothus
Cercocarpus minutiflorus, San Diego Mountain Mahogany
Epilobium canum, California Fuchsia
Ericameria cuneata, Wedgeleaf goldenbush
Eriogonum fasciculatum, California buckwheat
Hazardia squarrosa, Saw-toothed Goldenbush
Isocoma menziesii, Coastal Goldenbush
Isomeris arborea, Bladderpod
Lotus scoparius, Deer Weed
Lycium californicum, Coastal Boxthorn
Mimulus aurantiacus, Bush Monkeyflower
Prunus ilicifolia, Hollyleaf Cherry

Deep taproot (taproots find water sources deep below the soil surface, and are often thick and fleshy, so they can store available water)
Pinus species, Pine
Platanus racemosa, California Sycamore
Populus fremontii, Western Cottonwood
Quercus agrifolia, Coast live oak

Succulent leaves (succulent plants store water in their fleshy leaves, stems and roots)
Agave species, Agave
Cylindropuntia prolifera, Coastal Cholla
Dudleya species, Dudleya
Opuntia species, Prickly pear cactus
Yucca schidigera, Mohave Yucca
Yucca whipplei, Chaparral Candle

Pubescent leaves (pubescent leaves are covered with hairs, which may be tiny or long, and which help hold water and reflect the hot rays of the sun)
Asclepias californica, California Milkweed
Encelia farinosa, Brittlebush
Galvezia speciosa, Island Bush Snapdragon
Malacothamnus fasciculatus, Chaparral Mallow, Bush Mallow
Salvia apiana, White sage

Evergreen, sclerophylous leaves (evergreen leaves stay on the plant year-round; sclerophylous leaves have a hard surface and are frequently closely spaced together)
Arbutus menziesii, Madrone
Baccharis pilularis, Coyote brush
Eriodictyon crassifolium, Thick-laved yerba santa
Heteromeles arbutifolia, Toyon
Malosma laurina, Laurel sumac
Rhamnus species, Coffeeberry
Rhus integrifolia, Lemonadeberry
Rhus ovata, Sugar bush
Salvia leucophylla, Purple sage
Salvia mellifera, Black sage
Sambucus Mexicana, Mexican elderberry

Sources
http://www.cnpssd.org/plantlistlinked.html

 

by Clara Josephs, posted by Deb Shaw

After a healthy discussion at our quarterly meeting this past Saturday, we have come to a decision about framing for the show planned at Chapman University on drought tolerant plants.

Dick Blick Bamboo Gallery Frames

Dick Blick Bamboo Gallery Frames

The frame we will be using for our Chapman exhibit is the Dick Blick Light Bamboo Gallery frame.  Most paintings done on quarter sheets will fit into the 16 x 20 size frame.

If you purchase a pre-cut 16″ x 20″ mat, your matted painting should fit into #18858-7916 bamboo frame. That frame comes with acrylic “glass” and costs $27.50.

The light bamboo frame comes in a range of sizes, from 6″ x 6″ to 30″ x 40″. You may want to decide the final size of your painting when you are planning the composition.

Use the standard wire and D ring hanging system with no saw-tooth or projecting hardware, and a white or off-white mat.

We do not have an exact date set as yet for the show. However, we believe the gallery area will be available to us sometime in early spring, and that we will have room for three to four paintings per member. So, keep working on those paintings! We are hoping to hold several workshops on issues pertinent to portraying drought tolerant plants.

by Deb Shaw

The Arboretum at the University of California, Irvine is presenting its annual Winter Bulb Festival:

Saturday, March 3, 2012: 10 am to 4 pm
Sunday, March 4, 2012: 11 am to 3 pm

The South African bulb garden is in peak bloom, and the Arboretum Nursery will be having a plant sale featuring perennials, succulents and blooming bulbs.

For those BAGSC members interested in drought-tolerant subject matter for the upcoming Chapman University exhibition, this might be a perfect opportunity to acquire some interesting specimens. All those interested in going over after the quarterly BAGSC meeting at Deb’s house can go over as a group.

Admission is $2.00 and parking is free. For more information, call 949.824.5833.

by Bonnie Born Ash and Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

Join us on Saturday, March 3, 2012 for the quarterly BAGSC Meeting at Deb’s house.

Agenda

Coffee at 9:30 am, Meeting begins promptly at 10:00 am.

I.    President’s Report

  • 2012 Quarterly Meeting Dates – May 19, August 25, December 8
  • Members’ Survey Results

II.   Secretary’s Report

III.  Treasurer’s Report

IV.  Membership Report

V.   Old Business

VI. New Business

  • Classes for 2012
  • L. A. Arboretum “GROW! A Garden Festival”: May 3, 4, 5, 6
  • Field Trip to Lotusland: April 28
  • Chapman University Exhibition

Program:  “What makes a plant drought-tolerant?” Presentation, discussion of plant subjects suitable for the Chapman University Exhibition, where to find specimens and handouts.

Potluck Lunch

Be sure to bring your current work to share and RSVP with what you’re bringing to the potluck to Deb. See you there!

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