You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bowers Museum’ tag.

by Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

The Opuntia cactus in the courtyard at the entrance to Bowers Museum. Another beautiful Fall day in Southern California. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

The Opuntia cactus in the courtyard at the entrance to Bowers Museum. Another beautiful Fall day in Southern California. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

BAGSC members Diane Daly, Deb Shaw, and new BAGSC member Linda Carpenter spent a gorgeous Fall day at the Bowers Museum on November 22, demonstrating botanical art and talking with visitors to the Museum. BAGSC members are demonstrating in conjunction with the Bowers exhibition “The Red that Colored the World,” on display through February 21, 2016.

Cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) is a scale insect that lives on Opuntia cacti. The insect produces carminic acid, from which carmine dye is derived. The females and their nymphs secrete a waxy, white web to protect them from the sun and predators. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

Cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) is a scale insect that lives on Opuntia cacti. The insect produces carminic acid, from which carmine dye is derived. The females and their nymphs secrete a waxy, white web to protect them from the sun and predators. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

There is a huge Optuntia (Prickly Pear) growing in the courtyard at the entrance to the Bowers, serendipitously covered with Cochineal. We were lucky to have a large pad that had fallen to the ground, and, in addition to botanical art, we were able to show visitors the Cochineal scale insect, the color, and even some Mealybug Ladybird (ladybug) larvae who were feasting on the Cochineal. It was a whole world on one cactus pad. Visitors to the museum were fascinated (as were we!).

Live Cochineal (under the white on the Opuntia cactus paddle); dried Cochineal; and paint from the crushed insects. Photo by Diane Daly, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Live Cochineal (under the white on the Opuntia cactus paddle); dried Cochineal; and paint from the crushed insects. Photo by Diane Daly, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Diane Daly teaches at the Bowers Museum Treasures Program, which reaches out to senior centers, community centers, libraries, social service agencies and residential communities, engaging older adults who may be feeling isolated through art. The Thursday program focused on Cochineal as well, complete with demonstrations of crushing the bugs and using them to make paint. The seniors then painted an Aztec design using the paint. They could add lemon juice to some of the paint, which made it a lighter, warmer red.

Deborah Shaw will be teaching a a two-day color mixing class, “What’s Cool (and Warm) about Red” (with paint from the art supply store) on Saturday, December 12 and Sunday, December 13 at Bowers. Registration is through the Bowers website.

Additional BAGSC demonstration days in conjunction with the exhibition will be held in January and February. Come join us and learn about a color that changed the history of the world, that’s still in use today. (You’ll be amazed at how much Cochineal is still used in food, make-up and clothing dyes.) Email Deb to sign up!

by Deb Shaw

Image Credit: Detail, Sebastian Lopez de Arteaga, St. Michael and the Bull, c. 1650. Denver Art Museum Collection: Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer, 1994.27.

Image Credit: Detail, Sebastian Lopez de Arteaga, St. Michael and the Bull, c. 1650. Denver Art Museum Collection: Collection of Frederick and Jan Mayer, 1994.27.

BAGSC member Deborah Shaw will be teaching a two-part introductory workshop at Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California, Saturday, December 12 and Sunday, December 13, 2015, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm, “What’s Cool (and Warm) about Red: Color Mixing in Watercolor.”

Taught in conjunction with the exhibition “The Red that Colored the World,” this consecutive two-day workshop will use the flowers and fruits of the season as the basis for learning to mix a full spectrum of reds, both warm and cool. Delve into warm, fiery reds the first day, and cool, velvety reds the next. Explore transparency, undercolor painting and palette mixing. Suitable for beginners to advanced artists.

Location: John M. Lee Court in Bowers Museum
Price: Member $24 | General $30 | Students $20 with valid I.D.
Materials provided with a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor the day of class, and/or feel free to bring your own favorite materials.

Proceeds benefit Bowers Museum Education Programs. Tickets are non-refundable, may be purchased online or onsite. Questions? Contact Bowers by email or by calling 714.567.3677.

The exhibition, “The Red that Colored the World,” traces the history of cochineal and the seductive visual nature of red. It explores the quest for the perfect, vibrant red, which culminated in the Aztec marketplace of 16th-century Mexico, where Spanish explorers first encountered the American cochineal bug. More than 100 objects, which have all been tested to ensure they contain cochineal, come from all over the globe, and include textiles, sculpture, paintings, manuscripts, decorative arts, clothing and more. The exhibition was organized by the Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, and made possible by the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities and circulating through GuestCurator Traveling Exhibitions. Articles about the exhibition can be found on the Bowers Museum site, including coverage by the PBS NewsHour.

Bowers Museum is located at: 2002 North Main Street, Santa Ana, California 92706, 714.567.3600.
http://www.bowers.org

Deborah Shaw has a degree in fine art from Pomona College, The Claremont Colleges, where she also studied botany and native California flora. Ms. Shaw is an active member of the American Society of Botanical Artists, the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California, and the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, and has taught art and botanical art at numerous venues, including The Getty, Virginia Robinson Gardens and Bowers Museum.

Deborah’s work has been displayed in juried and non-juried exhibitions, and is in private collections. Her work is in the permanent collection at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University and other institutions. She has received numerous awards for art, illustration, design, product design and advertising. Her preferred media include graphite, watercolor, colored pencil, scratchboard, Illustrator and Photoshop.

by Deb Shaw

BAGSC member Deb Shaw will be teaching a two-part class on drawing gourds at the Bowers Museum:
Wednesday, November 5 and 12
1 pm – 4 pm
in the John M. Lee Court

Fall gourds, covered with bumps, ridges, nooks and crannies, are wonderful subjects for exploring how to create the illusion of three-dimensions on a flat piece of paper. Learn how lighting, shadows, highlights and reflected light create three-dimensional form.  This two-part workshop will use graphite, graphite powder, charcoal, charcoal powder and instant coffee as drawing and painting media.

Session I: Graphite (pencil) and graphite powder, Wednesday, November 5
Session II: Charcoal, charcoal powder, and instant coffee, Wednesday, November 12

Fee: Individual class: Bowers Museum members: $15; General public: $25
Series: Bowers Museum members: $25; General public: $35

One-time materials fee payable to instructor: $15
Advance reservations required to enable the accurate purchase of supplies.
Minimum 8 students or class will cancel.

Tickets may be purchased online; onsite at the Visitor Services Desk, or by calling Bowers Museum Reservations at 714.567.3677.

Questions? Email programs@bowers.org
Tickets are non-refundable. All proceeds benefit Bowers Museum Educational Programming.

Deborah B. Shaw, Cucurbita maxima, Buttercup Squashes and Section, watercolor on paper. © 2013, all rights reserved.

Deborah B. Shaw, Cucurbita maxima, Buttercup Squashes and Section, watercolor on paper. © 2013, all rights reserved.

About the instructor:
Deborah Shaw has a degree in fine art from Pomona College, The Claremont Colleges, where she also studied botany and native California flora. Ms. Shaw is an active member of the American Society of Botanical Artists, the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California, and the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, and has taught art and botanical art at numerous venues, including The Getty, The Huntington, Virginia Robinson Gardens and Bowers Museum.

Deborah’s work has been displayed in juried and non-juried exhibitions, and is in private collections. Her work also is in the permanent collection at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University. She has received numerous awards for art, illustration, design, product design and advertising. Her preferred media include graphite, watercolor, colored pencil, scratchboard, Illustrator and Photoshop.

 

by Diane Daly, posted by Deb Shaw

Treasurers' student working on a beautiful watercolor. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Treasurers’ student working on a beautiful watercolor of a sunflower. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

The James Irvine Foundation generously provides grants to the Bowers Museum Treasures Program. Bowers, in turn, uses the grants to reach out to the senior community. One way to engage older adults who may be feeling isolated is through art. The Treasures program reaches out to senior centers, community centers, libraries, social service agencies and residential communities by offering lectures, films, classes and tours.

The Council on Aging of Orange County is one of those agencies that works with the Bowers Treasures program. Since 1973, their mission has been to promote independence, health and dignity of older adults through compassion, education and advocacy. I have had the most rewarding experience and opportunity to teach a botanical drawing and painting class to the seniors at the Council on Aging. They provide translators since some of the seniors speak minimal English. I went home after the first class and brushed up on my Spanish and learned a greeting in Korean. The language differences seem to disappear when we are all involved in the art process of observing and drawing a fruit or plant. For eight sessions, we had a variety of specimens, starting with an apple and pear, a single tulip, a zinnia, a variety of peppers and chilis, a rose and finishing with a sunflower. It was pure joy to see the delight on their faces as they walked in and saw what the subject would be for the day.

Students who were completely blind (but formerly sighted) were able to produce beautiful drawings. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Students who are completely blind (but formerly sighted) were able to produce beautiful drawings. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

At first, when I was briefed on what the class should entail, I was told that there would be a few adults who were totally blind or had some sight impairment. Now, after all these years of trying to get as much detail in a botanical painting, I was truly baffled on how a blind person would be able to draw and how would I be able to teach them anything about drawing a flower. But, I was the one to learn a few things about drawing. They were able to feel the fruit or flower with their hands, emboss the paper with firm pressure on the pencil, use circle templates for guidance, and feel where to fill in the shape with color, with the aid of an assistant. I was amazed at the results. It is not botanical art as we know it, but is art that helps bring people together and give them pleasure and satisfaction. I made simple portfolios for them to take their drawings and paintings home on the last day.

Treasures' student drawing a radish in graphite. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Treasures’ student drawing a radish in graphite. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

I had another opportunity through the Treasures program to teach a class on painting Asian flowers on parasols. Since there were 90 adults coming to this program, we used markers instead of paint. With 90 parasols opened and everyone drawing flowers on them, it was quite a challenge to move around to all the tables. Once again, I was delighted at the results; beautiful, original designs on all the parasols. The parasols were used for a display in the museum that weekend for a cultural event. They were able to take home the parasols, as well as all the other art projects that they created.

Diane Daly giving feedback to Treasures' student. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

Diane Daly giving feedback to Treasures’ student. Photo courtesy of Bowers Museum/Council on Aging Orange County © 2014.

by Deb Shaw

Deborah Shaw, pen sketch of branch of Nicotania glauca  Graham (Tree tobacco), an invasive species in California. © 2014, Deborah B. Shaw

Deborah Shaw, pen sketch of branch of Nicotania glauca
Graham (Tree tobacco), an invasive species in California. © 2014, Deborah B. Shaw

BAGSC member Deborah Shaw will be teaching “Journaling in your Garden” workshops during the month of June at the J. Paul Getty and Bowers Museum.

At The Getty Center:
On Sundays, June 1 and June 15, 2014, 3:30 – 5:30 pm, Deb will be teaching “Drawing from the Masters: Creating a Garden and Wildflower Journal.” These workshops are part of the Getty’s tradition of sketching from original works of art every first and third Sundays of the month. “Creating a Garden and Wildflower Journal” will focus on the value of journaling, what to look for, and how to draw leaves and flowers. The workshop is free, and all experience levels are welcome. Participants are encouraged to bring sketchpads. Sign-up begins at 2:30 pm the day of the workshop at the main information desk, no preregistration required.

The Getty Center is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90049. Admission is always free; parking is $15.00.

At Bowers Museum:
Deborah also will be teaching a two-part series on Tuesdays, June 10 and June 17, 2014, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm in the John M. Lee Court at Bowers Musuem. Drawing and Painting Wildflowers and Flowers from your Garden will cover what to look for when looking at flowers and leaves, perspective tips, and graphite and color techniques to quickly capture plants and wildflowers in your journal.

Costs for individual classes are $15.00 for Bowers members, and $25.00 for non-members. Both workshops are available for Bowers members for $25.00, and $35.00 for non-members. A $15.00 materials fee is payable at the time of the class. Advance reservations required to enable the accurate purchase of supplies: e-mail or call the Education Department at 714.567.3677.

These workshops complement lectures at the Bowers on Renaissance Gardens (June 7) and Wildflowers (June 21). Bryan C. Keene, assistant curator of manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum will be giving the lecture about Renaissance Gardens. BAGSC members who participated in last Summer’s demonstrations at The Getty in conjunction with their “Gardens of the Renaissance” show will remember Bryan’s wonderful exhibition. Bryan will discuss the design, function, and meanings behind the many types of gardens planted in Europe between 1400-1600. Delve into illuminated manuscripts to discover how art, science, religion, myth, diet, and world travel shaped the evolving Renaissance garden.

The “Wildflowers” lecture and book signing will be given by Robert L. Allen. His recent publications, “Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains” can be purchased at the Bowers Gallery Store.

Bowers Museum is located in Santa Ana, CA, at 2002 North Main Street, 92706. Directions are included in the link above to Bowers Museum.

Enjoy the tradition of sketching from original works of art every first and third Sundays of the month at the Getty Center. In June, discover the practice of garden and wildflower journaling with botanical artist Deborah Shaw. Learn the value of journaling, what to look for, and how to draw leaves and flowers. All experience levels welcome. Participants are encouraged to bring sketchpads. This is a free program. Sign-up begins at 2:30 pm at the Information Desk. – See more at: http://getty.edu/visit/cal/courses/#sthash.ZK5yoRze.dpuf
Enjoy the tradition of sketching from original works of art every first and third Sundays of the month at the Getty Center. In June, discover the practice of garden and wildflower journaling with botanical artist Deborah Shaw. Learn the value of journaling, what to look for, and how to draw leaves and flowers. All experience levels welcome. Participants are encouraged to bring sketchpads. This is a free program. Sign-up begins at 2:30 pm at the Information Desk. – See more at: http://getty.edu/visit/cal/courses/#sthash.ZK5yoRze.dpuf
Enjoy the tradition of sketching from original works of art every first and third Sundays of the month at the Getty Center. In June, discover the practice of garden and wildflower journaling with botanical artist Deborah Shaw. Learn the value of journaling, what to look for, and how to draw leaves and flowers. All experience levels welcome. Participants are encouraged to bring sketchpads. This is a free program. Sign-up begins at 2:30 pm at the Information Desk. – See more at: http://getty.edu/visit/cal/courses/#sthash.ZK5yoRze.dpuf

Many botanical artists come to their craft from the applied arts: textiles, jewelry, ceramics and more. BAGSC member Deb Shaw will be teaching two botanical art workshops at Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California, in conjunction with the exhibition “A Quest for Beauty: The Art of Van Cleef & Arpels.” The workshops will be held on February 4 and February 11, 2014 and will explore using graphite, colored pencil and watercolor techniques. Classes will draw from live specimens, using the original drawings of flowers and jewelry on display in the Nature Gallery of the Van Cleef & Arpels exhibition as inspiration.

Enhance your experience by attending the optional 1 PM Gallery Talk and tour of the exhibition, led by Bowers Museum staff (20 minutes) and is free with class registration. Original drawings and paintings for designs are on display in addition to the spectacular jewelry, including many paintings with botanical themes.

Session I | February 4: Graphite and Colored Pencil

Session II | February 11: Graphite and Watercolor

Fee: Individual class: Members: $15, Non-Members: $25
Series: Members $25, Non-Members: $35

One time “materials fee”, payable to instructor: $15

There are a few spots still available. For reservations: e-mail education@bowers.org or call the Education Department at 714.567.3677.

“A Quest for Beauty: The Art of Van Cleef & Arpels” is a heritage exhibition spanning more than 100 years of history. The exhibition displays jewelry, watches, and precious accessories, as well as archive drawings and documents of the Place Vendôme High Jewelry Maison. More than 200 pieces from the private collections of Van Cleef & Arpels are  on display. The exhibition is built around four themes that continue to inspire the Maison: Nature, Elegance, Exoticism and Femininity. The exhibition ends on February 15, 2014.

Bowers Museum is located near the intersection of the 5 and the 22 Freeways, at: 2002 North Main Street, Santa Ana, CA 92706.

%d bloggers like this: