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by Anita Walsmit Sachs and Deb Shaw

Tulip Parade, watercolor by Anita Walsmit Sachs, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Tulip Parade, watercolor by Anita Walsmit Sachs, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Back by popular demand, Anita Walsmit Sachs will be offering a 5-day botanical drawing and painting workshop, “Hortus atelier” in cooperation with The Hortus botanicus, Leiden, in 2016.

The Hortus atelier program

The purpose of a botanical illustration is primarily a scientifically accurate drawing. The artistic input is reflected in the sensitivity in which the subject is displayed and in the composition.

PROGRAM: from April 11 to April 15, 2015, Course number 3 E C.2016.02 E
First day, the class starts at 10, with coffee and presentation, who is who and info, followed by a guided walk through the garden.
Lunch 12.00 – 12.30
Afternoon 12.30 – 15.45 Instruction about the subject to draw. Pencil drawing, including light and dark values.

Second day, instruction about material, paper, paint and colour mixing and composition.

Third day, transferring the drawing to the watercolour paper and painting.

Fourth and fifth days, continuing the process. Every day there will be a discussion about the progress of the drawing. The  education is individually focused to gain an optimal result.

Costs

The fee will be € 395,00 including morning coffee, brasserie lunch and afternoon drinks. Information about payment will follow after subscription as well as information about lodging possibilities. A small optional assignment will be given before the course starts. Sign ups for the class are through Anita directly via email.

About the Hortus

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is a green oasis in the center of Leiden.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is a green oasis in the center of Leiden.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands and one of the oldest in the world. It is located in the historical center of Leiden. Sitting behind the academy building of the Leiden University, the garden is a green oasis with a large collection of plants native to Southeast and East Asia, Southern Europe and South Africa. The Hortus is a haven within the city center, a historical monument and a meeting place full of character.

People go to the Hortus to relax, enjoy the seasons or to learn more about the diversity of the plant kingdom.

In 1590 the Hortus was founded by the University of Leiden. In 1594 Carolus Clusius (1526-1609) turned it into a medicinal herb garden. But Clusius introduced the tulip and many other plants like tobacco and potato to the Hortus. These flowers and plants became known throughout Western Europe.

Many famous international scientists such as Clusius, Boerhaave, Linnaeus and Einstein were connected to the Hortus botanicus in Leiden.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands, and one of the oldest in the world.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands, and one of the oldest in the world.

In the 19th century, the German physician Philipp Franz von Siebold (1796-1866) brought hundreds of plant species with him from Japan to the Netherlands and 15 of these original introductions can still be found in the Hortus today.

About the Artist

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio.

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio.

Anita initially trained in fashion design at the Royal Academy of fine Arts in The Hague. Fifteen years ago she became a scientific illustator at the National Herbarium of Leiden University, now Museum Naturalis. She has won two RHS Gold medals and a second prize medal at the RBG show in Sydney, Australia. Anita has participated in the Highgrove Florilegium of HRH Prince Charles, the Transylvanian Florilegium of HRH Prince Charles, and the Sydney Florilegium. She is passionate about painting and teaching.

by Anita Walsmit Sachs and Deb Shaw

Anita Walsmit Sachs will be offering a 5-day botanical drawing and painting workshop, “Hortus atelier” in cooperation with The Hortus botanicus, Leiden, in 2015.

About the Hortus

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is a green oasis in the center of Leiden.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is a green oasis in the center of Leiden.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands and one of the oldest in the world. It is located in the historical centre of Leiden. Sitting behind the academy building of the Leiden University, the garden is a green oasis with a large collection of plants native to Southeast and East Asia, Southern Europe and South Africa. The Hortus is a haven within the city centre, a historical monument and a meeting place full of character.

People go to the Hortus to relax, enjoy the seasons or to learn more about the diversity of the plant kingdom.

In 1590 the Hortus was founded by the University of Leiden. In 1594 Carolus Clusius (1526-1609) turned it into a medicinal herb garden. But Clusius introduced the tulip and many other plants like tobacco and potato to the Hortus. These flowers and plants became known throughout Western Europe.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands, and one of the oldest in the world.

The Hortus botanicus Leiden is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands, and one of the oldest in the world.

Many famous international scientists such as Clusius, Boerhaave, Linnaeus and Einstein were connected to the Hortus  botanicus in Leiden.

In the 19th century, the German physician Philipp Franz von Siebold (1796-1866) brought hundreds of plant species with him from Japan to the Netherlands and 15 of these original introductions can still be found in the Hortus today.

The Hortus atelier program

The purpose of a botanical illustration is primarily a scientifically accurate drawing. The artistic input is reflected in the sensitivity in which the subject is displayed and in the composition.

PROGRAM: from April 12 to April 16, 2015
First day, the class starts at 10, with coffee and presentation, who is who and info, followed by a guided walk through the garden.
Lunch 12.00 – 12.30
Afternoon 12.30 – 15.45 Instruction about the subject to draw. Pencil drawing, including light and dark values.

Second day, instruction about material, paper, paint and colour mixing and composition.

Third day, transferring the drawing to the watercolour paper and painting.

Fourth and fifth days, continuing the process. Every day there will be a discussion about the progress of the drawing. The  education is individually focused to gain an optimal result.

Gloriosa, watercolor by Anita Walsmit Sachs, 2014, all rights reserved.

Gloriosa, watercolor by Anita Walsmit Sachs, 2014, all rights reserved.

Costs

The fee will be € 375,00 including morning coffee, brasserie lunch and afternoon drinks. Information about payment will follow after subscription as well as information about lodging possibilities. A small optional assignment will be given before the course starts. Sign ups for the class are through Anita directly via email.

About the Artist

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio.

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio.

Anita initially trained in fashion design at the Royal Academy of fine Arts in The Hague. Fifteen years ago she became a scientific illustator at the National Herbarium of Leiden University, now Museum Naturalis. She has won two RHS Gold medals and a second prize medal at the RBG show in Sydney, Australia. Anita has participated in the Highgrove Florilegium of HRH Prince Charles. She is passionate about painting and teaching.

by John Keesey, posted by Deb Shaw

Sally's Studio

Sally’s beautiful studio space was all set up when we arrived, with handouts and gifts from Anita.

For three lovely days in mid-October twelve eager botanical artists enjoyed the warm personality and dazzling expertise of Anita Walsmit Sachs from the Netherlands. They met each morning in the pleasant downstairs classroom of Sally Jacobs’ Studio near LACMA to learn botanical line drawing from Anita, the head of the Art Department of the Nationaal Herbarium Nederland of the University of Leiden in the Netherlands.  She brought many examples of the beautifully composed line drawings she creates for scientific articles, complete with ink stippling to suggest shading and shape. She has also contributed exquisite watercolors of Acer and Syinga to the Florilegium of the Prince of Wales’ Estate at Highgrove, and has won two gold medals from the Royal Horticultural Society of England.

Mimulus 'Dave', by John Keesey, pen and ink, © 2012

Mimulus ‘Dave’, by John Keesey, pen and ink, © 2012

We brought our own plant to draw, first in pencil to show the “habit” or repeating part of the plant, then details of structure often viewed under a dissecting microscope and drawn over graph paper. These pencil drawings were cut out and taped into a suitable composition, which was perhaps the most challenging aspect of the project. This was then transferred via tracing paper and a light box to a paper with a vellum finish suitable for inking, which was done using Rotring or Staedler pens of several sizes to indicate the light source and overlapping. Finally graduated stippling with these pens to indicate shading and shape was discovered to be an excellent form of meditation!

Salvia 'Hot Salsa' by Joan Keesey, pen and ink, © 2012

Salvia ‘Hot Salsa’ by Joan Keesey, pen and ink, © 2012

Botanical artists who attended these sessions included Sally Jacobs, Leslie Walker, Deborah Shaw, Tania Norris, Norma Sarkin, Janice Sharp, Bonnie Born Ash, Joan Keesey, Tania Marien, Mitsuko Schultz, Alyse Ochniak and Estelle DeRidder.  Also present was Yours Truly, John Keesey.

Part of a Western Sycamore by Estelle DeRidder, pen and ink, © 2012

Part of a Western Sycamore by Estelle DeRidder, pen and ink, © 2012

Note to all who attended the class: Please email a photo of your drawing and/or sketches to Deb, so she can post them to the blog.

Anita discusses inking techniques with the class.

Anita discusses inking techniques with the class.

by Leslie Walker, posted by Deb Shaw

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio. © Anita Walsmit Sachs

Anita Walsmit Sachs in her studio. © Anita Walsmit Sachs

Anita is an experienced Scientific Illustrator and teacher who is coming from the Netherlands to teach this very special class on October 12, 13, and 14. For a complete biography and an opportunity to see her work, visit her website.

Each student will select and bring to class a plant they wish to draw and get to know intimately.

The first day you will get to know the plant by study, making dissections, using a microscope and drawing.

The second day will be spent making a composition and deciding the technique you wish to work in.  This can be in pencil, watercolor or pen and ink which will make it  a scientific piece.

The last day we will try to finish our drawing or painting.

The teaching will be individual. Some experience would be nice.

The cost of this three day class on October 12, 13 and 14,  will be $300. The cost for non-members is $350. Space will be held upon receipt of a $50.00 non-refundable deposit. Final payment is due to Leslie by September 28. A list of materials and a suggested reading list will be sent by email, upon payment of deposit. Checks should be made out to “BAGSC” and sent to Janice. Questions? Contact Leslie until August 31 or Janice after August 31.

The class will be held October 12, 13 & 14, from 9:30 to 3:30 each day at Sally Jacobs’ Studio.

You don’t want to miss this wonderful opportunity. Class size is limited, so register as soon as you can.

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