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by Veronica Raymond, posted by Deb Shaw

Although not a BAGSC or ASBA workshop, the following may be interesting to all of us who are working on trees for the ASBA exhibition “Out of the Woods”.Dr. Matt Ritter, professor at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, will be teaching a workshop entitled, “Tough Trees Made Easy: Pines, Oaks, Eucalypts, and Figs.”

Here is the workshop description and information, by Dr. Ritter and Dr. Yost:

Learn to ID species in the most difficult groups of trees! Help support student research travel. At this workshop we will teach you the biology and important identifying characters of pines, oaks, eucalypts, and figs. This all-day workshop will include lecture and lots of hands-on lab time for you to test your knowledge and practice difficult tree identification. You will walk away with the skills and working knowledge needed to identify species in the largest and most confusing groups of trees in California. We’ll also send you away with all the reference materials you’ll need for future work with these ubiquitous trees.

Three workshop locations to choose from:

  • Palomar College, San Marcos on Tuesday June 28th, 2016
  • The Los Angeles County Arboretum, Arcadia on Thursday June 30th, 2016
  • San Jose State University, San Jose on Thursday July 7th, 2016

The workshop costs $120 and includes:

  • A workshop packet and illustrated materials for identification
  • Post workshop online identification and reference tools
  • Catered breakfast and lunch, coffee, tea, and refreshments
  • ISA Continuing Education Units (7 units)

100% of the workshop proceeds go to support student research travel to Australia. Learn new information while helping a Cal Poly student realize their dream!

Space is limited, register online or email Matt Ritter.

 

Workshop Instructors:

Dr. Matt Ritter: Winner of the WCISA R. W. Harris Award for Excellence in Education and author of California’s funniest book on trees.

Dr. Jenn Yost: Inspiring Professor of Botany at Cal Poly, where she teaches plant identification, ecology, and evolution.

by Alyse Ochniak, posted by Deb Shaw

Leaves of the Quercus ruber (English Oak) outside the Botanical Ed Center. Photo credit: © 2015 Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

Leaves of the Quercus ruber (English Oak) outside the Botanical Ed Center. Photo credit: © 2015 Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

On October 24, 2015, BAGSC members enjoyed an informative class taught by Dr. Jim Folsom, Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens.

The class focused on the growth and structure of trees. Students looked at branches from the Quercus ruber (English Oak), from outside the Botanical Ed Center, studying leaves and growth buds. Dissection and compound microscopes were used to bring tiny cell structures of oak leaves and bark into focus.

After studying the different cells and structures students enjoyed a walk with Jim looking at different growth habits, bark, leaves and acorns of different oak trees in the gardens.

Quercus suber, Cork oak tree, from looking at trees with Jim Folsom. Photo credit: © 2015, Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

Quercus suber, Cork oak tree, from looking at trees with Jim Folsom. Photo credit: © 2015, Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

The class ended with refreshments and discussion of the next workshop on January 17, 2016.

Hurry space is limited, if you want to sign up for the next workshop! The January 17, 2016 workshop is limited to 20 students, and will be held in the Engemann Applied Tech Lab, from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm. Cost is $10.00, payable at the workshop. Reservations are required, however; please RSVP to Alyse Ochniak. Reservations are first come, first served.

For more information about the New York Botanical Garden Triennial “Out of the Woods, Celebrating Trees in Public Places” visit the ASBA website.

Quercus suber, Cork oak tree, close up of bark. Photo credit: © 2015, Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

Quercus suber, Cork oak tree, close up of bark. Photo credit: © 2015, Alyse Ochniak, all rights reserved.

The Huntington is located at: 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, California, 91108.

About the instructor:
Jim Folsom, PhD., rides the demographic peak of baby boomers, having been born in southeastern Alabama in 1950. His lifelong love of plants is reflected in a BS in Botany from Auburn University, an MA in Biology from Vanderbilt University, and a PhD in research botany from The University of Texas at Austin. Though his research has centered on the orchid family, with much of the research time spent in Tropical America (including a year in Colombia on a Fulbright Pre-Doctoral Fellowship), Jim’s botanical interests are wide-ranging. As Curator of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington in San Marino, CA, he dedicates much of his effort to educational programs that increase public interest and understanding of the science, culture, and history of plants and gardens. He lives at The Huntington with his wife, Debra (also a botanist) and children Molly and Jimmy. Jim was recognized as a Friend of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America in 1996, a Member-at-Large of the Garden Club of America in 1998, and presented a Professional Citation by the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta in 1999. The Garden Club of America awarded him their Medal of Honor in 2007.

by Alyse Ochniak, posted by Deb Shaw

Jim Folsom lecturing during the "Weird, Wild & Wonderful Symposium." Photo by Clara Josephs, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Jim Folsom lecturing during the “Weird, Wild & Wonderful Symposium.” Photo by Clara Josephs, © 2015, all rights reserved.

More looking forward to the next New York Botanical Garden Triennial, “Out of the Woods”:

Jim Folsom, Marge and Sherm Telleen Director of the Botanical Gardens, will be teaching two workshops about the structure of trees at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, on:
October 24, 2015 (limit 30 students) in the Brody Teaching Lab, from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm, and
January 17, 2016 (limit 20 students) in the Engemann Applied Tech Lab, from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Cost is $10.00 each session, payable at the workshop. Reservations are required, however; please RSVP to Alyse Ochniak. Reservations are first come, first served.

Come to one or both! Each session will be a 3-hour demonstration/workshop. Students will use dissection and compound microscopes to examine tree architecture, growth patterns, and structural characteristics using fresh and prepared material (provided by the Gardens). Discussion will include characteristics and terminology used to describe trees, and most useful in identification. Instruction will give particular attention to natural growth patterns and specific details of tree morphology and anatomy that would impact veracity of depiction.

Workshops only require pencil/pen and sketchbooks for taking notes, although artists are welcome to bring whatever materials they would like to use. Attendees are welcome to stay and draw in the Gardens after the class.

For more information about the New York Botanical Garden Triennial “Out of the Woods, Celebrating Trees in Public Places” visit the ASBA website.

The Huntington is located at: 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, California, 91108.

About the instructor:
Jim Folsom, PhD., rides the demographic peak of baby boomers, having been born in southeastern Alabama in 1950. His lifelong love of plants is reflected in a BS in Botany from Auburn University, an MA in Biology from Vanderbilt University, and a PhD in research botany from The University of Texas at Austin. Though his research has centered on the orchid family, with much of the research time spent in Tropical America (including a year in Colombia on a Fulbright Pre-Doctoral Fellowship), Jim’s botanical interests are wide-ranging. As Curator of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington in San Marino, CA, he dedicates much of his effort to educational programs that increase public interest and understanding of the science, culture, and history of plants and gardens. He lives at The Huntington with his wife, Debra (also a botanist) and children Molly and Jimmy. Jim was recognized as a Friend of the Cactus and Succulent Society of America in 1996, a Member-at-Large of the Garden Club of America in 1998, and presented a Professional Citation by the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta in 1999. The Garden Club of America awarded him their Medal of Honor in 2007.

by Gayle Uyehara, posted by Deb Shaw

Carol Govan delivered a fast-paced, exciting lecture about botany. Photo by Gayle Uyehara.

Carol Govan delivered a fast-paced, exciting lecture about botany. Photo by Gayle Uyehara.

Carol Govan’s Thursday “Wow, Botany Is Exciting” workshop really was that, WOW!

Carol contacted the class participants a few weeks earlier and sent us a very informative email and handout with all the technical terms we would learn so we wouldn’t have to stop and look them up during class. She also told us to relax but hang on tight because the workshop was structured from her 8-week course at Wellesley College Botanic Gardens. In three hours we learned the parts of a plant and their function in a humorous, informative manner that only Carol can deliver.

After we learned the names of the plant parts, we quickly sketched the specimen before us and labeled them. “Quick” being the emphasis and it was amazing how many things we had captured in our short observation. What a treat this class was!

Learning the plant parts. Photo by Gayle Uyehara.

Learning the plant parts. Photo by Gayle Uyehara.

Carol’s botany workshop built on this newbie’s vocabulary in a manner that will allow me to pick up a book and know what to look for in the field. She pointed out several older reference books because of their descriptive words of the plant rather than their non-visual clues like DNA and chemical properties.

Toward the end of class, Carol demonstrated how she uses sketch paper, hard pencil and grid frame to capture a quick but accurate gesture composition of a plant; keeping in mind the negative spaces she creates. The grid was only a few marks on paper and frame but gave her a visual clue about placement on the paper.  From there she does a quick contour drawing which she will work with the rest of the time—while making any corrections to her gesture drawing. The color she adds as part of her sketch is made from a three-color palette made up of the primaries. She mixes up her watercolor swatch on a white plate to include the shadow and highlights.

Carol finished up this delightful workshop by telling us how she uses her sketches to create a composition and showed us examples of her finished pieces.

Let me mention again what a treat this class was!

I am sure that I will think of her many times as I  continue on my botanical art journey. Thank you Carol!

by Kathlyn Powell, posted by Deb Shaw

I wanted to let everyone know about a terrific 25 podcast series on BBC Radio 4 called “Plants: From Roots to Riches” that might be of interest. Each podcast is approximately 15 minutes, and is free. All of the podcasts can be downloaded at the same time.

“Plants: From Roots to Riches” is a brief history of botanical science and our changing relationship with plants over the last 250 years—from tools, to objects of beauty, to an essential resource we have to conserve. Presented by Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the series draws upon the archives, collections and scientific research at the Royal Botanical Gardens Kew. Additional information is available from the series main website, including clips, galleries and additional podcasts.

I found out about it from an article in my favorite magazine, New Scientist. Enjoy!

by Deb Shaw

ArtPlantae Display at Aurea Vista in Riverside, California, © 2012 Tania Marien

ArtPlantae Display at Aurea Vista in Riverside, California, © 2012 Tania Marien

This weekend ArtPlantae will participate in the First Annual Holiday Party at Aurea Vista, Riverside’s newest shopping destination.

The holidays aren’t the only thing to celebrate this weekend, however.

ArtPlantae is celebrating the launch of a new plant-based education display featuring resources for children, parents and teachers. Dedicated specifically to botany and botanical art education, this section features curriculum by the National Gardening Association, children’s books about plants (in English and Spanish), instructional books about drawing and botanical art, plant identification guides, and the Colorful Edibles coloring book published by the American Society of Botanical Artists.

When visiting ArtPlantae at Aurea Vista, don’t miss the display area upstairs featuring books about contemporary botanical art and botanical art history.

Discover more this Saturday during the holiday party. The festivities begin at 4:00 pm and continue until 9:00 pm. Meet local artists and designers and finish your holiday shopping too. Visit ArtPlantae’s new area about plant-based education and receive a free gift. It is located downstairs across from the children’s boutique.

Stop by on your way to the Festival of Lights and the Artists Collective located just down the street on the Main Street Pedestrian Mall.

Free gifts available while supplies last.

A Little About Aurea Vista

Aurea Vista is located in a building in downtown Riverside, California whose life began in 1927 as a hotel built by architect G. Stanley Wilson. Today the building serves as an exciting new marketplace for local artisans, designers, importers, food sellers and craftspeople.

Visit Aurea Vista and discover many treasures such as delicious olive oils by Beyond the Olive, terrarium designs by Brenda Cook of Botanical Perspective, and yards of inspiration (and classes too!) at Raincross Fiber Arts.

Aurea Vista is located at 3498 University Avenue in Riverside on the corner of Lemon and University. Hours are Monday-Saturday (11-8), Sunday (11-5). Store hours are extended for Riverside’s monthly ArtsWalk and other special events.

Parking: Free customer parking is available across the street in the parking lot with the ballet mural. Aurea Vista customers can park in spaces #1-8 that face University Avenue. Street parking is free after 5 PM Monday-Friday. Street parking also is free on Saturday and Sunday.

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