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posted by Deb Shaw

For those who follow the online award-winning blog “Colossal,” you make have seen the post “A New Japanese Painting Supply Store Lines its Walls With 4,200 Different Pigments“. A spectacular store design by architect Kengo Kuma uses bamboo to create beautiful open, airy spaces that display a stunning array of art supplies and tools like museum pieces.

One wall contains thousands of vials of every imaginable color (more than 4200 pigments), lending the name, Pigment, to the art supply store and laboratory, just opened in Tokyo. Pigment provides the latest colors, along with hard-to-find, rare pigments and tools used in art preservation, as well as brushes, special glues and binders, papers, canvas, wood frames and more.

Supplies are available online.

Mummy Brown* and Other Historical Colors, Arranged by Date (More or Less) from Prehistory to Almost-Present, Veritable Hokum, by Korwin Briggs, http://www.veritablehokum.com/ [Click image for larger view.] Used with permission as stated in terms under "About", © 2015.

Mummy Brown* and Other Historical Colors, Arranged by Date (More or Less) from Prehistory to Almost-Present, Veritable Hokum, by Korwin Briggs, http://www.veritablehokum.com/ [Click image for larger view.] Used with permission as stated in terms under “About”, in the Veritable Hokum blog. © 2015.

by Deb Shaw

Korwin Briggs is an illustrator who publishes the online comic blog Veritable Hokum (click the name to go to the blog). As he writes in his “About” section, “Veritable Hokum is a comic about mostly history, maybe science, and possibly some other stuff too.”

This week’s delightful post is a comic illustration and description about the history of pigments, entitled “Mummy Brown* and Other Historical Colors, Arranged by Date (More or Less) from Prehistory to Almost-Present.” Click on the link above to read the entire article as well as enjoy the graphic description of some of our favorite pigments. The history doesn’t go all the way to the modern Quinacridones, but contains fun facts and history in a quick read format with a great sense of humor.

Enjoy!

By Beth Stone, posted by Deb Shaw

Caltech is offering a lecture entitled “Watching Paint Dry and Colors Fade: The Intersection of Art and Science,” by Katherine T. Faber, the Simon Ramo Professor of Materials Science at Caltech. A part of the Earnest C. Watson Lecture Series, the lecture will explore the links between science, engineering and art about pigments, color, fading masterpieces and more.

Wednesday, May 20, 2105
8 pm
Beckman Auditorium
Caltech
Presented by Caltech Committee on Institute Programs

Description and more online on the Caltech Public Events Calendar.

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