by Deb Shaw

Some of our BAGSC members are lucky to stay for the post-conference workshops, but many of the rest of us have gotten home. We had a great response to our “Live from the Conference” postings; many sent emails letting us know how much they enjoyed the posts. I’m sorry I was struggling with a technology meltdown and couldn’t get all of them up sooner. I believe I now have the technology (mostly) behaving, and will get things posted as quickly as possible.

[Brush holder] The Rocky Mountain Chapter made (yes, HANDMADE) pine brush holders for each of the conference attendees. Photo is of my new brush holder, happily ensconced in its new home on my work table. Photo by Deb Shaw.

[Brush holder] The Rocky Mountain Chapter made (yes, HANDMADE) pine brush holders for each of the conference attendees. Photo is of my new brush holder, happily ensconced in its new home on my work table. Photo by Deb Shaw.

We know first-hand how much work is involved in hosting a conference; the Rocky Mountain Society of Botanical Artists did a wonderful job. It’s great to get back together with old friends and meet new ones; pick up a few tips and techniques; and get re-inspired.

Thank you to the Rocky Mountain Society of Botanical Artists and ASBA for all your hard work. And thank you to the roving BAGSC reporters who sent in stories and photos. If you have any more, keep ’em coming and I’ll get them posted. For readers; lots more to come.

See you next year at the Weird, Wild & Wonderful Symposium at the Huntington in the Summer, and at the ASBA Annual Meeting and Conference in Miami in October.

Happy painting!

[Brush holder back] Susan Fisher explained that the wood came from pine trees harvested after being killed by Mountain Pine Beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae), native to the forests of western North America. The blue color of the wood is the result of staining from the beetle infestation. Libby Kyer designed the logo on the back, which was also on the water bottles donated by Libby and her husband. Photo by Deb Shaw.

[Brush holder back] Susan Fisher explained that the wood came from pine trees harvested after being killed by Mountain Pine Beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae), native to the forests of western North America. The blue color of the wood is the result of staining from the beetle infestation. Libby Kyer designed the logo on the back, which was also on the water bottles donated by Libby and her husband. Photo by Deb Shaw.

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