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by Estelle DeRidder, posted by Deb Shaw

As part of the 9th California Island Symposium, the Island Art Exhibition now moves from the Ventura Beach Marriott to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.

The public is invited to the opening reception of the Island Art Exhibition at the Pritzlaff Conservation Center at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden on October 11 from 6 – 7:30 pm. Guests will be able to enjoy the art and views of the Channel Islands. Light appetizers and refreshments will be served. The event is free, but registration is required. The exhibition will be on display at the Garden from October 11 through November 6, 2016.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

First place went to an acrylic painting by Marcia Burtt that depicts Prisoners Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. Nicole Strasburg won second place with a gouache etching of Scorpion Valley on Santa Cruz Island. Third place winner Estelle DeRidder used colored pencil to illustrate a native Toyon. An honorable mention was awarded to Mitsuko Schultz for her watercolor of a California Sycamore.

Registration and information for the opening reception at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is available on their website.

About the Island Art Exhibition:
The Island Art Exhibition explores creative practices at the intersection of art and science as a component of the California Islands Symposium. The Islands Symposia have been held every five years since 1965, and present recent work in all disciplines of natural, environmental, and cultural science on the California Islands, which include all of the islets, rocks, and islands off the Pacific coast of California and Baja California, Mexico. This juried art exhibition encourages a greater understanding and appreciation of the unique California Islands. The display features original paintings, watercolors, and pen and ink drawings that reflect the beauty of the islands.

About the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden:
The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is a 78-acre nonprofit educational and scientific institution that conserves California’s native plants through gardens, research, education, and sustainable practices. The Garden was founded in 1926 and is one of the nation’s oldest botanical gardens focused exclusively on native plants.

by Estelle De Ridder, posted by Deb Shaw

The California Islands Symposia have been held more or less, every five years since 1965, to share up-to-date information about the management, scientific research, work in all disciplines of natural and cultural science and general well-being of the California islands.

The 9th California Island Symposium for 2016 is being held at the Marriott Hotel, Ventura, California. One of the less scientific and more entertaining presentations of this symposium will be the Art Exhibit that has been advertised for more than six months. The three jurors worked hard and with diligence to put together a coherent show that will present the Channel Islands to the public in an inviting and interesting manner. After the symposium, the exhibit will be moved to the Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens, where it will be on display for another three weeks.

The Channel Islands of California comprise eight islands located in the Pacific Ocean off the Southern California coast. Five of the islands and the surrounding waters are part of Channel Islands National Park and the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.

The Park is supported by many partners who share the protection of the history and prehistory, the cultural and biological diversity as well as protecting vital habitat for marine, terrestrial plant and animal species.

Public appreciation through education, interpretation and research is widely promoted.

Isolation over many thousands of years has developed unique animals, plants and archeological resources found ONLY on these islands and makes is possible for visitors to experience the western coast of the North America as it used to be.

Visitation has increased dramatically over the years, and with contracted concessionaires, the numbers show how the interest in the islands have grown:
1963   = 1,200
2014   =   342,000

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow. © 2016, Estelle De Ridder. Malva Rosa is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family. It is endemic to California, where it is native only to the Channel Islands. It can also be found growing as an escapee from cultivation in coastal mainland California. This illustration was done on drafting film and paper with watercolor and colored pencil.

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow. © 2016, Estelle De Ridder, all rights reserved. Watercolor and colored pencil on drafting film and paper.

Flora on the Channel Islands include a unique subspecies of pine, oak and island tree mallow.

Santa Rosa Island holds two groves of the endemic to the island, Torrey pine subspecies Pinus torreyana var. insularis. Torrey pines are the United States’ rarest pine species. The islands also house many rare and endangered species of plants, including the island barberry, the island rush rose, and the Santa Cruz Island lace pod. Giant kelp forests surround the islands and act as a source of nutrition and protection for other animals.

BAGSC members Estelle De Ridder, Mitsuko Schultz and Ellie Tu are participating in the exhibition.

Estelle has illustrated two species: Malva assurgentiflora and Heteromeles abtutifolia.

Malva assurgentiflora, the Island Mallow, Mission Mallow, Royal Mallow, Island Tree Mallow, Malva Rosa is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family. It grows into a strikingly architectural shrub/small tree with beautiful white bark.

It is endemic to California, where it is native only to the Channel Islands. It can also be found growing as an escapee from cultivation in coastal mainland California.

Estelle’s painting of Heteromeles abtutifolia was done on paper with watercolor and colored pencil. Heteromeles abtutifolia, Toyon berry, grows on the north-facing coastal bluffs of Santa Cruz Island. It grows on all the other islands, except Santa Barbara island, and was planted on San Nicolas.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Plantanus racemosa, California Sycamore, Watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Mitsuko Schultz had her Platanus racemosa, California Sycamore accepted to the exhibition.

Ellie Tu has three pieces in the exhibition: Dudleya greenei, Coreopsis, and Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis is a strikingly strange plant. It grows on dunes, rocky cliffs and exposed slopes, and has a fleshy trunk and branches. It can reach heights of eight feet with a five inch trunk. It is deciduous and dormant in the dry season, taking on an other worldly appearance when visitors hike through a large stand of them. In spring, however, masses of bright yellow blooms put on quite a show.

Ceanothus arboreus, Feltleaf Ceanothus, or Island Ceanothus. Watercolor, © 2016, Ellie Tu, all rights reserved.

Ceanothus arboreus, Feltleaf Ceanothus, or Island Ceanothus. Watercolor, © 2016, Ellie Tu, all rights reserved.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg, (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis, Ellie Tu, colored pencil, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Leptosyne gigantea Kellogg, (formerly Coreopsis gigantea), Giant Coreopsis, Ellie Tu, colored pencil, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

by Leslie Walker and Carol Woodin, posted by Deb Shaw

California Islands SymposiaThe 9th Annual California Islands Symposium is holding a juried show in conjunction with the National Park Service Centennial Celebration.

Exhibition dates:
October 3-7, 2016, Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura, California

With special showing
October 9 – November 6, 2016, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara, California

Accepting Submissions: April 1, 2016 – July 1, 2016

Details for submission can be found at http://www.californiaislands.net/island-art-exhibition/

Artists are invited to enter original artwork in any two-dimensional medium that reflects the beauty and uniqueness of the California islands. All entries must depict the flora, fauna, or landscapes of the California islands. The show will be hung for the duration of the conference. A special showing at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden will follow. Cash prize awards.

The California Islands Symposium and National Park Service believe that including the arts in the international symposium is a critical component in cultivating a greater appreciation of the unique California islands.

Prizes
First Place $500
Second Place $300
Third Place $200

All winning entries and the Conference Choice entry will be published on the California Islands, Channel Islands National Park, and Santa Barbara Botanical Garden websites.

2016 Exhibition Calendar

  • April 1, 2016: Accepting entry forms and digital images
  • July 6: Deadline for receipt of images
  • August 3: Selection results mailed
  • September 26: Deadline for shipped artwork to be received
  • September 28: Deadline for hand-carried artwork
  • October 3: Exhibition opens to California Islands Symposium attendees and the public
  • October 7: Exhibition closes at 1:00 pm
  • October 9: Exhibition opens at Santa Barbara Botanical Garden
  • November 6: Exhibition closes at 3:00 pm. Pick-up until 5:00 pm
  • November 8: Artwork shipped back to artists

Eligibility
Open to all artists. Artists are invited to enter original artwork in any two-dimensional medium that reflects the beauty and uniqueness of the flora, fauna, and landscapes of the California Islands.

Digital Image Procedure
Entries may include up to three digital images. Artists will pay one entry fee for three images. All work must be .jpg file at least 300 dpi. It is crucial that all images be on the highest quality so our judges can fully appreciate and scrutinize your entry.

Entry Fees
$35 for each entry.

Jury Procedure
All artwork will be juried by digital image. Criteria for acceptance will include artistic presentation and technical use of medium, represented by a high-quality digital image. Artists whose work has been accepted will be notified by email by July 30, 2016. Winners will be selected by judges; final choices will be confirmed in person at the conference. The Conference Choice winner will be chosen by attendee votes at the conference.

Further Information
For further information, please check the California Islands Symposium website, http://www.californiaislands.net/symposium or contact Paula Power, (805)658-5784.

Judges:

Bruce Everett, Professor Emeritus, California State University Northridge, is a renowned landscape painter with over 50 years of experience teaching at the college level as Professor of Painting, Drawing and Design. His work is represented in museum and corporate collections, public commissions, and has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions. Everett’s work appears in many publications including L.A.Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980.

http://www.bruceeverett.net

Hank Pitcher, painter of California culture and the coastal landscape, is a Senior Lecturer SOE of the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has been part of the core faculty since 1971. A cross-disciplinarian active in conservation, Pitcher is a member of the Advisory Committee of the University of California Natural Reserve System, the Oak Group, and supporter of numerous local and national conservation organizations. He is represented by Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, Santa Barbara.

http://www.hankpitcher.com

Karen Kitchel is intrigued by concepts of native vs. invasive, and landscapes that contain stories of human exploration, occupation, and change. The resulting paintings combine meticulous craftsmanship with a conceptual point of view and aggressive, minimalist presentation.

Kitchel’s oil paintings have been featured in exhibitions throughout the U.S., and are in numerous private and public collections worldwide, including the Denver Art Museum, the Palm Springs Art Museum, and the U.S. State Department, among others.

Karen Kitchel was born in Battle Creek, Michigan and graduated from Kalamazoo College and Claremont Graduate University. She has exhibited professionally for over thirty years, and is represented by Robischon Gallery of Denver, CO, and Gerald Peters Gallery of Santa Fe, NM and New York, NY.

www.karenkitchel.com

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