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by Deb Shaw

"Fragaria x ananassa 'Fragoo Pink'," Strawberry, watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2013, all rights reserved.

“Fragaria x ananassa ‘Fragoo Pink’,” Strawberry, watercolor by Mitsuko Schultz, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Submission deadlines for the The BAGSC exhibition “Cornucopia” at The San Diego Botanic Garden, Ecke Building are roaring up soon. Complete submission of up to three (3) artworks, forms, digital images and $35 entry fee are due by August 12, 2016.

“Cornucopia” will focus on all plants consumable. All life depends on plants, so let’s celebrate the diversity of plant life used in food, beverages and to enhance flavor. Draw or paint the weird fruit or vegetable found in the grocery store, the prize tomato from your backyard garden, an exotic spice or the essential ingredient of a beverage (such as hops!). If you can, include a recipe using your plant subject, or some information about how the plant is used. Submitted artworks can include any traditional media, including watercolor, colored pencil, graphite and pen and ink.

All current BAGSC members in good standing (dues paid) are eligible to enter up to three (3) two-dimensional artwork(s). High quality prints are acceptable, but no photos or digital enhancements please. We are encouraging all BAGSC members, of all experience levels to enter at least one piece.

This is not a juries show. Though not a juried show, if space becomes an issue, selections will be made to show a diversity of subjects and to include as many artists as possible.

The “Call for Entries” packet was sent via email blast to all BAGSC members. If you did not receive it, or have problems with the file, please contact Deb Shaw or Janice Sharp.

Looking forward to seeing your incredible edibles!

by Olga Eysymont and Beth Stone, posted by Deb Shaw

Passion Flower study, Olga Eysymontt, © 2008, all rights reserved.

Passion Flower study, Olga Eysymontt, © 2008, all rights reserved.

BAGSC Founder and Member Olga Eysymont will begin her next six-week graphite pencil workshop this coming Sunday, June 12, 2016 at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden. Entitled “Botanical Illustration: Plant Studies,” this workshop will explore the subject of plant families, with the goal of demonstrating both correct representation of the specimen, as well as a good compositional design. An emphasis on correct placement of light on form will be emphasized, in order to produce an authentic and realistic illustration.

The fundamental necessary skills to accomplish this begins with a 3-step process:

  1. contour drawing on tracing paper,
  2. compositional layout and value studies of the specimens on tracing paper, and, finally,
  3. a transfer of the tracing onto drawing paper for a final rendering.

Students will be expected to bring all of their own plant material after the first class.

“Botanical Illustration: Plant Studies,” in graphite, will meet for six Sundays, from 9:30 am – 3:30 pm, beginning Sunday, June 12, 2016. Sundays: 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/10, 7/24, and 8/7.

Registration

Register online through Otis College of Art and Design Continuing Education. All classes will be held at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden. The non-credit course (#25440) is $435 plus fees of $25 registration, $14 insurance and 2.75% on-line convenience, for a total of $487. Certificate and Credit options are also available for additional cost.

The linked page also has an option (see lower left) to register offline (PDF), if preferred. This PDF form includes email, FAX and phone registration information.

The Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden is located at: 301 North Baldwin Ave, Arcadia, CA 91007.

Workshop Outline

Session 1: Apples or Pears

Session 2: Nuts or Seeds and Pods

Session 3: Root Vegetables

Session 4: Leafy Greens or Herbs

Session 5: Mushrooms

Session 6: Succulents

Class Materials:

14″ x 17” Strathmore Drawing Pad Series 400, Medium or equivalent. (You may use another brand, but please, no sketch or recycled paper.

14” x 17” Medium Weight Tracing Paper (any brand)

Drafting Pencil with Holder and Sharpener

HB and 2B leads (at least 2 each)

Eraser Stick

Erasing Shield

Drafting Brush

Mars Drafting Dots (masking tape)

Portable Task Light (Ott-Lite)

(Vis a Vis wet erase fine point marker, Clip, 8″ x 10″ Plexi and 8″ x 10″ format supplied by teacher for $10.00)

by Deb Shaw

BAGSC News previously posted Gilly Shaeffer’s acceptance into “Celebrating Flora of the National Parks“, the new exhibition by the United States Botanic Garden (USBG) and the National Park Service (NPS) showcasing plants and ecological communities found throughout the more than 400 national parks.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

Dudleya greenei, watercolor by Ellie Tu, © 2016, all rights reserved. This plant grows in the Channel Islands National Park.

BAGSC member Ellie Tu also was accepted into “Celebrating Flora”. Ellie’s cousin visited the exhibition at the US Botanic Garden at the end of March, and sent these photos of his visit.

The exhibition, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NPS and the diversity of our national park’s flora, will run from February 18 – October 2, 2016 in the USBG Conservatory in Washington, D.C. Artworks in a wide variety of media by 78 artists from across the country are on display, along with living specimens from the USBG and graphics representing each of the National Parks represented. Programs will include botanical illustration and photography workshops, meet-the-artist sessions, and lectures by national parks rangers and other experts.

The U.S. Botanic Garden is the oldest public garden in the United States, and is open to the public, free of charge, every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Conservatory is located at 100 Maryland Ave. SW, on the southwest side of the U.S. Capitol. More information about the exhibit, programs, and visiting the USBG is available on the website.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Gallery wall showing Dudleya greenei by Ellie Tu; and California Poppy and Toyon Berries by Gilly Shaeffer. © 2016 by the artists, all rights reserved. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016.

Congratulations to Ellie and Gilly, and Happy 100th birthday to the US Botanic Garden!

Entry to "Flora of the National Parks". Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

Entry to “Flora of the National Parks”. Photo by Keith Fisher, © 2016, all rights reserved.

by Melanie Campbell-Carter and Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

The opening day of the 18th Annual Botanical Art Exhibition at Filoli was a most extraordinary day from start to finish! New BAGSC member and Filoli student Ellie Tu had graciously delivered all the BAGSC paintings to Woodside the week before. At dawn on Thursday, April 7, Gilly Shaeffer, Mitsuko Schultz, Cristina Baltayian and Melanie Campbell-Carter arose and departed for a fabulous day at Filoli Gardens. Our first stop was to view the 65 lovely botanical paintings from the US and the Netherlands. Gilly said, “The quality of the paintings this year was truly inspiring!”

It was a magical day in the gardens. With picture-perfect sunny skies and warm breezes, we could not resist enjoying the gorgeous grounds in full spring bloom. The Filoli volunteers made our visit very special by sharing all their knowledge about the history of the estate, even giving a quick personal tour of the home. The Mark Catesby and select pieces of the Filoli and Highgrove Florilegiums prints were exhibited in the ballroom, and well worth a visit.

When the crowd gathered at the reception for the presentation of awards, we were thrilled to hear that Melanie Campbell-Carter was presented the Roth Award, “for distinction with an emphasis on traditional botanical art presentation” for her Duabanga grandiflora. Lee McCaffree was presented with the Bourn award, “for distinction with an emphasis on horticulture” for Narcissus ‘Delibes’, the Alcatraz Daffodil. The third award, the Jurors’ award, “for distinction with an emphasis on botanical art presentation”, went to Milly Acharya for her Lathyrus odoratus, Sweet Pea.

Everything about the day was perfectly delightful, and we feel that we have blazed a trail for future BAGSC jet-setting adventures! We heartily encourage everyone to see the exhibit before it closes on June 12, and to enjoy the beautiful spring gardens at Filoli.

BAGSC members accepted into the 18th Annual Botanical Art Exhibition at Filoli include:

  • Cristina Baltayian
  • Melanie Campbell-Carter
  • Joan Keesey
  • Lee McCaffree
  • Mitsuko Schultz
  • Gilly Shaeffer
  • Ellie Tu

The 18th Annual Botanical Art Exhibition at Filoli goes through June 12th. Filoli is located at 86 Cañada Road, Woodside, CA 94062.

Kudos to all the award winners, and congratulations to all the accepted artists!

Click on an image of the exhibition opening and the Filoli gardens to enlarge:

 

by Diane Daly and Deb Shaw

The Opuntia cactus in the courtyard at the entrance to Bowers Museum. Another beautiful Fall day in Southern California. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

The Opuntia cactus in the courtyard at the entrance to Bowers Museum. Another beautiful Fall day in Southern California. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

BAGSC members Diane Daly, Deb Shaw, and new BAGSC member Linda Carpenter spent a gorgeous Fall day at the Bowers Museum on November 22, demonstrating botanical art and talking with visitors to the Museum. BAGSC members are demonstrating in conjunction with the Bowers exhibition “The Red that Colored the World,” on display through February 21, 2016.

Cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) is a scale insect that lives on Opuntia cacti. The insect produces carminic acid, from which carmine dye is derived. The females and their nymphs secrete a waxy, white web to protect them from the sun and predators. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

Cochineal (Dactylopius coccus) is a scale insect that lives on Opuntia cacti. The insect produces carminic acid, from which carmine dye is derived. The females and their nymphs secrete a waxy, white web to protect them from the sun and predators. Photo © Deborah Shaw, 2015.

There is a huge Optuntia (Prickly Pear) growing in the courtyard at the entrance to the Bowers, serendipitously covered with Cochineal. We were lucky to have a large pad that had fallen to the ground, and, in addition to botanical art, we were able to show visitors the Cochineal scale insect, the color, and even some Mealybug Ladybird (ladybug) larvae who were feasting on the Cochineal. It was a whole world on one cactus pad. Visitors to the museum were fascinated (as were we!).

Live Cochineal (under the white on the Opuntia cactus paddle); dried Cochineal; and paint from the crushed insects. Photo by Diane Daly, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Live Cochineal (under the white on the Opuntia cactus paddle); dried Cochineal; and paint from the crushed insects. Photo by Diane Daly, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Diane Daly teaches at the Bowers Museum Treasures Program, which reaches out to senior centers, community centers, libraries, social service agencies and residential communities, engaging older adults who may be feeling isolated through art. The Thursday program focused on Cochineal as well, complete with demonstrations of crushing the bugs and using them to make paint. The seniors then painted an Aztec design using the paint. They could add lemon juice to some of the paint, which made it a lighter, warmer red.

Deborah Shaw will be teaching a a two-day color mixing class, “What’s Cool (and Warm) about Red” (with paint from the art supply store) on Saturday, December 12 and Sunday, December 13 at Bowers. Registration is through the Bowers website.

Additional BAGSC demonstration days in conjunction with the exhibition will be held in January and February. Come join us and learn about a color that changed the history of the world, that’s still in use today. (You’ll be amazed at how much Cochineal is still used in food, make-up and clothing dyes.) Email Deb to sign up!

by Maureen Horn, Librarian, Massachusetts Horticulture Society, via email from Danielle Rudeen, The Huntington, posted by Deb Shaw

"Cereus," by Mrs. William Duffield, 1892. Massachusetts Horticultural Society Library, Box 9, Repros (shelf locator). Gift of Mrs. Fiske Warren, March, 1943. Permalink: http://ark.digitalcommonwealth.org/ark:/50959/0p097c160  This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC BY-NC-ND).

“Cereus lemoinei,” by Mrs. William Duffield, 1892. Massachusetts Horticultural Society Library, Box 9, Repros (shelf locator). Gift of Mrs. Fiske Warren, March, 1943. Permalink: http://ark.digitalcommonwealth.org/ark:/50959/0p097c160 This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC BY-NC-ND).

The Massachusetts Horticulture Society has announced that its botanical print collection has been digitized at the Boston Public Library and is ready to be viewed online.

The digitizing and posting of the collection is the culmination of three months of collaboration between the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, the Boston Public Library, and Digital Commonwealth. More than 1,000 rare images from the oldest horticultural library in the nation are now available for viewing and use by members, scholars, historians, artists and the general public.

Mass Hort’s Botanical Print Collection contains more than three centuries of botanical illustration, dating from 1620 to 1969, offering an invaluable resource. Artists and the public can explore images that until now have been seen only by experts.

Tom Blake, Digital Projects Manager, Boston Public Library, commented that “Digital Commonwealth enables Massachusetts cultural institutions to develop a virtual presence, enhancing education and research by creating a community of support, offering professional advice, and facilitating collaboration. The Digital Commonwealth portal facilitates worldwide access to the cultural heritage of Massachusetts. Our repository provides an affordable option to organizations that are unable to host one locally.”

The Horticultural Library at Massachusetts Horticultural Society was the first in the United States.  It was established soon after the Society was founded in 1829 to share horticulture knowledge and beauty through its prints, books, extensive collection of seed catalogs, and other rare materials.

Noticing an interest in botanical prints, the Society mounted its first major exhibit in 1968. It continued with another exhibition in 1969, when a group of lily prints was shown to the North American Lily Society at its annual meeting.

Today, digitization and online access to special collections is an important strategy for any cultural heritage organization. With the help of Digital Commonwealth, Mass Hort’s Library will meet the 21st Century digital needs of students, researchers, authors and the public.

Massachusetts Horticultural Society’s botanical prints are available online at the Digital Commonwealth repository at https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/collections/commonwealth:k930hm897 . These images are available for the purposes of viewing and studying and not for commercial use.

Massachusetts Horticultural Society’s Library collection includes more than 20,000 volumes at their library in the Education Center of the Elm Bank horticulture center and gardens. Additionally, the Society maintains 5,000 rare books, manuscripts, prints, seed catalogs, glass slides, and early transactions of horticultural institutions at a separate archival storage facility.

Many of the books transferred to the Chicago Botanical Garden’s Lenhardt Library Rare Book Collection in the early 2000’s by Mass Hort are now available online through the Illinois Digital Archives at http://www.idaillinois.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/ncbglib01; search on “Massachusetts Horticultural Society.”

by Lori Vreeke, posted by Deb Shaw

Hanging the "Zoo in Bloom" BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Hanging the “Zoo in Bloom” BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

I just wanted to share a few pictures from the Santa Barabara Zoo. The artwork was hung yesterday, and everything looks wonderful!

Please join us on Saturday, October 3 for the opening reception for the exhibition from 10 am – 2 pm. See the posting on the Zoo’s website. The Zoo has offered free entry to our members and families; please wear your BAGSC name badge if you have one, and contact Lori Vreeke for information about free entry.

Hanging the "Zoo in Bloom" BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Hanging the “Zoo in Bloom” BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

The Zoo is anticipating 600 – 800 members in the morning on Saturday. BAGSC artists will be demonstrating throughout the day, and there will be BAGSC-led activities for kids and families. BAGSC volunteers and demonstrators are welcome!! There are still a few volunteer slots available, and the more volunteers available for BAGSC public activities the merrier. Please contact Lori Vreeke to let her if you would like to volunteer for an hour or so, and please bring any extra paper, colored pencils and pencils to share.

Hanging the "Zoo in Bloom" BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Hanging the “Zoo in Bloom” BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Bring a lunch, or enjoy the café right outside the exhibition hall for a beautiful day in a beautiful setting.

The show will hang in the Volentine Gallery in the Zoo’s Discovery Pavilion October 3—January 3. The Santa Barbara Zoo is located at: 500 Ninos Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.
(805) 962-5339 main; (805) 962-6310 info line

 
Looking forward to the exhibit, and hope to see you there!

Hanging the "Zoo in Bloom" BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Hanging the “Zoo in Bloom” BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Photo by Lori Vreeke, © 2015, all rights reserved.

by Gilly Shaeffer, posted by Deb Shaw

Asuka Hishiki demonstrating during the "Weird, Wild & Wonderful" Symposium at The Huntington, July 2015. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki demonstrating during the “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” Symposium at The Huntington, July 2015. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

During the recent “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” Symposium at The Huntington, I watched Asuka Hishiki as she demonstrated how she would paint a segment of an heirloom tomato skin. Here are my impressions of the way she went about developing this small sample of the tomato skin with paint.

  • Asuka says every time she approaches her subject it is new for her.
  • Asuka starts sketches on tracing paper.
  • She uses a wood pencil in a pencil holder which she sharpens with a box cutter.
  • She goes over her pencil lines with a lighter color paint or yellow ochre.  So she will have thin lines in watercolor for her drawing.
  • At this point she erases any pencil lines.
  • She covers the entire form with a Chinese white wash. (The Chinese white that she likes is the Holbein brand.)  She says one should stay very light when applying the first layer of this white paint. This Chinese white wash acts as a protection for the paper. Much of it gets taken off during the removal of the masking fluid (to be mentioned later).
  • Asuka will add more Chinese white paint on the places where she wants the paint to bleed to create  soft color transitions. She also mentions the importance of keeping  harmony in the colors used as the form develops.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • She mixes three colors together in a small amount to be used to develop the form using the dry brush technique. She uses Interlon brand brush #3/0 for her dry brush work.
  • In preparing to use masking fluid to prevent certain areas of the paper from getting painted, she would prime the brush to be used with liquid soap. The soap helps to keep the masking fluid brush in good shape for future use. This brush is used exclusively for masking fluid.
  • She will use the masking fluid to hold the places that she does not want to get painted—in this case the place where a leaf would be (which looks like a skinny wiggly line in the photos), where the highlights would be and where imperfections would be found on the tomato skin.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • Asuka stipples on the masking fluid with a very skinny brush on the section that she has begun to paint.
  • She uses tissue to blot any extra paint from her paper.
  • Then she adds a second layer of  masking fluid. So, this layer of masking fluid dots will have more tone than the first layer of dots that she applied that prevent any paint from getting through to the paper.
  • She always makes sure that the paint and the masking fluid that she has applied are absolutely dry before proceeding.
  • She says that you can lift paint more easily when you have first applied a Chinese white wash to the paper.
  • She applies a layer of Yellow Ochre wash.
  • She continues to develop the form through her dry brush technique. At this point the masking fluid remains on the painted area.
Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

Asuka Hishiki masking fluid technique. Photo by Gilly Shaeffer, © 2015.

  • Asuka uses Winsor Newton Series 7 brushes, #5 and #3 for the colored washes.
  • She adds a third layer of masking fluid dots.
  • With WN Series 7 #5 brush, she puts a colored wash on the section that she had previously dry brushed. This makes any lines from dry brushing disappear.
  • Now she lifts the masking fluid dots. When she does this she is also lifting the Chinese white paint that was applied to the paper at the very start.  The white of the paper now shows through in the places that had masking fluid on them.
  • She decides that she wants to apply another layer (this would be the fourth layer) of masking fluid dots. This will make the dots appear lighter and less visible than the layers applied earlier.
  • Next more dry brushing with a deeper color paint. Some stippling is used. Then some more wet strokes (colored washes) to further the development of the form.
  • When she removes the fourth layer of masking fluid, it is easy to see the section of the heirloom tomato skin developing on the paper with its highlights, its shiny smooth skin, its roundness, its imperfections and its rich colors of orange, red, and purple.

by Deb Shaw

Focus on Nature XIV (FON XIV) has announced they will open in November, 2016 at the Roger Tory Peterson Institute (RTPI) in Jamestown, New York. It is an exciting collaboration between two institutions dedicated to continuing the tradition of natural history illustration. RTPI is a beautiful facility with exceptional exhibition space.

The entry deadline for FON XIV will be March 16, 2016. They will be posting the on-line entry form on the website (and I will hopefully receive an email alert as well, so I can post it to the BAGSC blog). Please check the FON website often as they are in the process of updating.

BAGSC and ASBA members have been well represented through the years in the FON exhibitions. Visit the FON website to view artwork from past exhibitions and award winners.

Stay tuned!

by Lesley Randall, posted by Deb Shaw

Aristolochia gigantea, ink on paper, Lesley Randall, © 2013, all rights reserved

Aristolochia gigantea, ink on paper, Lesley Randall, © 2013, all rights reserved.

Lesley Randall will be teaching a two-day workshop on pen and ink for botanical illustration in northern California. Sponsored by the UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity, this workshop is for students of all levels.

Saturday, October 24 and Sunday, October 25, 2015
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
3075 Sciences Laboratory Building
UC Davis

The cost is $170.00 for Davis Botanical Society and ASBA members; $190.00 for non-members. Make checks payable to Lesley Randall and send to her address. Questions? Contact Lesley via email.

Botanical illustration is an art with a long tradition. Although accuracy is the top priority, pen and ink botanical illustrations are art pieces of elegant beauty. Lesley will cover the basics from sketching to transfer and inking techniques. Types of papers and pens will also be discussed. All levels of experience are welcome! Students are encouraged to bring completed sketches so they can focus on inking techniques.

Lesley has been an illustrator for 27 years. Her published work has appeared in The Flora of Yosemite National Park, The Jepson Manual, Invasive Plants of California’s Wildlands and numerous scientific journals. She has exhibited her work in Australia, the United Kingdom, New York City and California.

by Lori Vreeke, posted by Deb Shaw

Front of "Zoo in Bloom" invitation postcard, with artwork by Lori Vreeke.

Front of “Zoo in Bloom” invitation postcard, with artwork by Lori Vreeke.

The Santa Barbara Zoo is advertising the opening reception and exhibition for the “Zoo in Bloom” exhibition. The show opening is October 3, 2015, from 10:00am – 5:00pm on Saturday, October 3, 2015, in the Volentine Family Gallery. 

The Volentine Family Gallery is located inside the Discovery Pavilion. Zoo admission rates apply, and drinks and snacks will be available for purchase.

BAGSC members will be demonstrating and answering questions all day. Download the PDF invitation postcard by clicking on this link: ZooArtShowInvitation_2015.

Also happening on October 3rd at the Zoo: Member Morning, from 8 am – 10 am; and ZOOs Line is it Anyway?

The Santa Barbara Zoo is located at:
500 Ninos Drive
Santa Barbara, CA 93103
(805) 962-5339 main
(805) 962-6310 info line
sbzoo.org

by Lori Vreeke/Diane Daly/Deb Shaw

The jurors for the BAGSC exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoological Gardens, “Zoo in Bloom” have been announced: Olga Eysymontt, Ann Swan, and Chris Briggs.

Their bios are as follows:

Olga Eysymontt:
Olga is one of the founding members of BAGSC, and has taught botanical illustration classes for the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden since 1997. She is a former instructor at Otis College of Art, and a graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology in Fine Arts. Olga is passionate about teaching and the thrill of bringing out each student’s vision. In addition to botanical illustration, she enjoys landscape and macro photography.

Ann Swan:
Based in Wiltshire, UK, Ann works primarily in graphite and coloured pencil. She is well known for her exquisitely fine detail, vibrant colours and strong contemporary style. Ann champions the underdogs of the plant kingdom—drawing attention to Brussels sprouts or beetroots and demonstrating through her art that they are just as beautiful as the iris or tulip. She is equally passionate about coloured pencils, believing they are easy to master, forgiving and accessible, enabling even a complete beginner to produce quality artwork.

Ann began exhibiting in 1990 and now shows her work worldwide. Exhibitions include The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in 1994 and the Hunt Institute’s 8th International Exhibition in Pittsburgh. Ann is a member of the RHS Picture Committee and exhibits with the Society of Botanical Artists on a regular basis. She has exhibited numerous times at the Chelsea and Hampton Court Flower Shows. Her work is represented in the prestigious Shirley Sherwood Collection and is in many private collections around the world.

Chris Briggs:
Following six years in the Navy and a seven year hiatus in Hawaii, Chris Briggs returned to the mainland to attend the University of Oregon in Political Science and Environmental Studies, and then the University of Florida for a degree in Photojournalism. He came to California in 1992 to attend Brooks Institute for a degree in Commercial Photography. Chris is currently the Director of Safety and Security at the Santa Barbara Zoo and personally hangs all the exhibitions at the Zoo. He continues to photograph nature and landscapes with an emphasis on Southern California.

Chris has spent the past 20+ years chasing, photographing, and identifying spring wildflowers. In his spare time he is an active gardener, or at least he was before the drought!

A warm welcome to our jurors.

More plants!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Thank you to Diane and a very patient Jack Daly for more plant images. We’ve included Lori’s images in the slide show as well. They are the same as those published in the previous Santa Barbara “Zoo in Bloom” article, but are single images and larger here, so they may be easier to see.

As the exhibition title suggests, artwork of plants at the Zoo in flower fits the theme perfectly. Additionally, any plant species that grows at the zoo is eligible for entry even if it is not currently blooming.

Submission Deadline is September 5, 2015. Questions? Contact Lori Vreeke.

by Janice Sharp and Bonnie Born Ash, posted by Deb Shaw

People's Choice first place award went to Estelle DeRidder’s, Fuller’s Teasel, Dipsacus fullonum, colored pencil on paper, © 2015 Estelle DeRidder, all rights reserved.

People’s Choice first place award went to Estelle DeRidder’s, Fuller’s Teasel, Dipsacus fullonum, colored pencil on paper, © 2015 Estelle DeRidder, all rights reserved.

During the opening reception for the adjunct exhibition by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC), friends, family and the public were able to vote for their personal favorites. The votes are in and the ribbons have been hung for the last three days of the show, Friday, 7 August – Sunday, 9 August.

People's Choice second place award went to Lori Vreeke's, Field Pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo var.  ovifera, colored pencil on paper, © 2015 Lori Vreeke, all rights reserved.

People’s Choice second place award went to Lori Vreeke’s, Field Pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo var. ovifera, colored pencil on paper, © 2015 Lori Vreeke, all rights reserved.

First prize went to Estelle DeRidder’s Fuller’s Teasel with 16 votes. Second prize went to Lori Vreeke’s Field Pumpkin with 12 votes and third prize to Asuka Hishika’s Black Daikon Radish with 11 votes.

There were a surprisingly large number of votes cast (191) and the votes were distributed throughout all the artworks in the show. It is clear that there are many different themes and media that appeal to different viewers, but everyone agrees that the chosen works are fabulous!

People's Choice third place award went to Asuka Hishiki's, Black Daikon Radish (Kuromaru Daikon), Raphanus sativus, watercolor on paper, © 2015 Asuka Hishiki, all rights reserved.

People’s Choice third place award went to Asuka Hishiki’s, Black Daikon Radish (Kuromaru Daikon), Raphanus sativus, watercolor on paper, © 2015 Asuka Hishiki, all rights reserved.

by Lori Vreeke, posted by Deb Shaw

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

BAGSC will be holding a juried exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoological Gardens, entitled “Zoo in Bloom”.

All current BAGSC members in good standing are eligible to enter up to two (2) original works of art of botanical flowering specimens grown at the zoo (no prints).  Artwork must depict plants that grow at the Zoo, but does not have to be drawn there. There is no size limitation, and works may have been shown in previous BAGSC, ASBA, Filoli or other exhibitions.

The exhibition will continue through the end of the 2015 and will be open every day to visitors of the zoo. Due to space constraints, this will be a juried show with approximately 30 pieces of art hung. Jurors will be a zoo representative, a local Southern California juror and a juror from the UK. All original artwork must be for sale, prints not allowed.

Submission Deadline is September 5, 2015. Questions? Contact Lori Vreeke.

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

A plant list and the Call for Entries packet will be emailed to BAGSC members.

The opening reception for this wonderful opportunity will be in conjunction with the gala celebrating Santa Barbara Zoo Members Day, running from 9:00am – 5:00pm on Saturday, October 3, 2015. BAGSC artists will be  demonstrating throughout the day in the gardens and an information table will be set up to answer any questions about our exhibit and BAGSC. Sign-up requests to follow.

The Santa Barbara zoo is home to over 600 animals on 30 acres of lush gardens overlooking the Pacific Ocean.  The property was originally  home to a private residence and was gifted to the city as a park. In 1963, the zoo opened to the public featuring formal gardens and lawns, native plants and trees, cacti and succulents, ornamentals and exotic species throughout the park to recreate natural habitat.

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

Flower images photographed by Lori Vreeke at the Santa Barbara Zoo, © 2015, all rights reserved.

by Deb Shaw

Invitation to BAGSC adjunct exhibition.

Invitation to BAGSC adjunct exhibition.

In conjunction with “Weird, Wild, and Wonderful” The New York Botanical Garden Second Triennial Exhibition, the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) will present a supplemental exhibition from August 1–9, in the Brody Botanical Center’s Banta Hall at The Huntington, featuring free public demonstrations, lectures about botanical art, and specimens of botanical curiosities. The BAGSC adjunct exhibition features 72 artworks by 37 members.

An exhibition of Botanical Oddities…
illustrations by the
Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California
in The Frances Lasker Brody Botanical Center
At The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

August 1–9, 2015 (closed Tuesday)
10:30 am – 4:30 pm

We will have a reception for BAGSC members, our guests, and Huntington VIPs and staff at:
10:00 am this Saturday, August 1, 2015
before The Huntington opens to the public.

The “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” New York Triennial exhibition also will be open the entire time the BAGSC exhibition is up, August 1 – 9, except on Tuesday, when The Huntington is closed.
Weird, Wild & Wonderful exhibition dates:
June 13 – August 23
Exhibition open to the public weekends only and each day August 1–9
Additional exhibition information: asba-art.org/exhibitions/weird-wild-wonderful
Exhibition information and hours posted at huntington.org

Artists in the BAGSC exhibition include:
Bonnie Born Ash, Cristina Baltayian, Nancy Beckham, Melanie Campbell-Carter, Jan Clouse, Diane Daly, Estelle DeRidder, Nancy Grubb, Asuka Hishiki, Cynthia Jackson, Susan Jackson, Clara Josephs, Joan Keesey, Suzanne Kuuskmae, Teri Kuwahara, Patricia Mark, Lee McCaffree, Arillyn Moran-Lawrence, Kathy Morgan, Terri Munroe, Alyse Ochniak, Marilyn Parrino, Dolores Pope, Kathlyn  Powell, Lesley Randall, Veronica Raymond, Robyn Reilman, Norma Sarkin, Mitsuko Schultz, Gilly Shaeffer, Janice Sharp, Deborah Shaw, Beth Stone, Gayle Uyehara, Lori Vreeke, Leslie Walker, Jude Wiesenfeld.

Download the full invitation here: bagscExhibitionInviteF

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